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A Different Treatment of Sports in the Media: The Use of Parody in the French Program Les Guignols de l’Info

Sylvain Cubizolles

This article studies the progress of sports media coverage through a new form of headline treatment: parody. It presents the analysis of a corpus including the “best of” from the satiric program Les Guignols de l’Info. This program has been broadcast each evening on the French television channel Canal+ since 1989. The study is based on 265 sketches from 1990 to 2006 and asks the central questions of caricatures in the sports world: what they represent and what they assess. A list of appearances of the various puppets on the show is presented. The central figure of the sports world at Les Guignols de l’Info is the champion who is finally judged—through his or her different attributed caricature traits—on the core value of his or her authenticity. Although it criticizes the world of sports, Les Guignols redeems these sport champions.

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Ownership in European Soccer, Financial Fair Play, and Performance in UEFA’s 2006–2018 Champions League Tournaments

Gidon Jakar and Stephanie Gerretsen

are members of a European governing body, the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). As members of the organization, clubs from each league can qualify to participate in two primary competitions, the Champions League and the Europa League. In this research study, we are particularly

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Elite Athletes: Are the Genes the Champions?

Alejandro Lucía, María Morán, He Zihong, and Jonatan R. Ruiz

Recent research has analyzed the genetic factors that influence world-class athletic status. Much of what we know comes from association studies, with the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms having been extensively studied. The association between the ACTN3 R577X variation and elite athlete status in power sports is strongly documented, yet whether the current body of knowledge on other variants can be extrapolated to athletic champion status remains to be determined. Athletic champion status is a complex polygenic trait in which numerous candidate genes, complex gene–gene interactions, and environment–gene interactions are involved. Besides the need for more studies and new approaches taking into account the complexity of the problem, we believe that factors beyond genetic endowment are likely to have a stronger influence in the attainment of athletic champion status.

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Training Distribution During a Paralympic Cycle for a Multiple Swimming Champion With Paraplegia: A Case Report

Julia Kathrin Baumgart, Espen Tønnessen, Morten Eklund, and Øyvind Sandbakk

, and joints. 3 Among world-class Para swimmers, the weekly training distance is reported to be approximately half (15–35 km·wk −1 ) 4 , 5 compared with able-bodied swimmers (40–70 km·wk −1 ). 2 , 6 In line with this, a case study on a multiple Paralympic swimming champion with cerebral palsy

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The Physiological Characteristics of an 83-Year-Old Champion Female Master Runner

Thomas Cattagni, Vincent Gremeaux, and Romuald Lepers

with that observed in sedentary young healthy males) have been reported in 65-to-80-year-old champion male athletes, 2 , 3 while only ∼20 to 25 mL·kg −1 ·min −1 is generally observed in age-matched untrained people. 4 Two studies even reported a VO 2 max of 50 mL·kg −1 ·min −1 for an 80-year

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Sources of Stress in National Champion Figure Skaters

Daniel Gould, Susan Jackson, and Laura Finch

This investigation examined stress and sources of stress experienced by U.S. national champion figure skaters. Seventeen national champions, who held their titles between 1985 and 1990, were interviewed about the stress they experienced as national champions and were asked to identify specific sources of stress. Qualitative methodology was used to inductively analyze the interview transcripts and revealed that 71% of the skaters experienced more stress after winning their title than before doing so. Stress source dimensions were also identified and included: relationship issues, expectations and pressure to perform, psychological demands on skater resources, physical demands on skater resources, environmental demands on skater resources, life direction concerns, and a number of individual specific uncategorizable sources. In general, these findings parallel the previous elite figure skaters stress source research of Scanlan, Stein, and Ravizza (1991), although there were several points of divergence relative to the type of stressors experienced by this sample of national champion athletes.

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Becoming a World Champion Powerlifter at 71 Years of Age: It Is Never Too Late to Start Exercising

Cas J. Fuchs, Jorn Trommelen, Michelle E.G. Weijzen, Joey S.J. Smeets, Janneau van Kranenburg, Lex B. Verdijk, and Luc J.C. van Loon

athletes warranted ( McKendry et al., 2018 ). Here we present a case study of the present 71-year-old female world champion powerlifting (Figure  1 ) who started resistance exercise training at 63 years of age and in whom we assessed body composition, muscle strength, cardiorespiratory fitness, and

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A 5-Year Analysis of Weight Cycling Practices in a Male World Champion Professional Boxer: Potential Implications for Obesity and Cardiometabolic Disease

James C. Morehen, Carl Langan-Evans, Elliot C.R. Hall, Graeme L. Close, and James P. Morton

body composition of a male professional boxer. To this end, we monitored a British, Commonwealth, and World Champion boxer over a 5-year period comprising 11 professional contests. This athlete competed at the highest level of the sport where the data collection period culminated in a World Title

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The Annual Training Periodization of 8 World Champions in Orienteering

Espen Tønnessen, Ida S. Svendsen, Bent R. Rønnestad, Jonny Hisdal, Thomas A. Haugen, and Stephen Seiler

One year of training data from 8 elite orienteers were divided into a transition phase (TP), general preparatory phase (GPP), specific preparatory phase (SPP), and competition phase (CP). Average weekly training volume and frequency, hours at different intensities (zones 1–3), cross-training, running, orienteering, interval training, continuous training, and competition were calculated. Training volume was higher in GPP than TP, SPP, and CP (14.9 vs 9.7, 11.5, and 10.6 h/wk, P < .05). Training frequency was higher in GPP than TP (10 vs 7.5 sessions/wk, P < .05). Zone 1 training was higher in GPP than TP, SPP, and CP (11.3 vs 7.1, 8.3, and 7.7 h/wk, P < .05). Zone 3 training was higher in SPP and CP than in TP and GPP (0.9 and 1.1 vs 1.6 and 1.5 h/wk, P < .05). Cross-training was higher in GPP than SPP and CP (4.3 vs 0.8 h/wk, P < .05). Interval training was higher in GPP than TP, SPP, and CP (0.7 vs 0.3 h/wk, P < .05). High-intensity continuous training was higher in GPP than CP (0.9 vs 0.4 h/wk, P < .05), while competition was higher in SPP and CP than in TP and GPP (1.3 and 1.5 vs 0.6 and 0.3 h/wk, P < .01). In conclusion, these champion endurance athletes achieved a progressive reduction in total training volume from GPP to CP via a shortening of each individual session while the number of training sessions remained unchanged. This decrease in training volume was primarily due to a reduction in the number of hours of low-intensity, non-sport-specific cross-training.

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Life at the Top: The Experiences of U.s. National Champion Figure Skaters

Daniel Gould, Susan A. Jackson, and Laura M. Finch

This study was designed to better understand the positive and negative aspects of being a national champion athlete, to uncover difficulties encountered in defending a championship title, and to solicit recommendations for achieving and maintaining national champion status. Seventeen U.S. national champion figure skaters who held titles between 1985 and 1990 participated in in-depth interviews. A number of positive and negative experiences were identified. Difficulties encountered in defending a championship were associated with increased expectations and responsibilities, a shift in motivational orientation from chasing to being chased where arousal was increased and interpreted negatively, and athletic injuries and the stress related to those injuries. Recommendations focused on such things as not being afraid to grow and take risks, filtering feedback and advice, not falling into the trap of feeling one has to be perfect, and seeking and utilizing social support.