Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for :

  • "child care center" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Temitope Erinosho, Derek Hales, Amber Vaughn, Stephanie Mazzucca and Dianne S. Ward

Background:

This study assessed physical activity and screen time policies in child-care centers and their associations with physical activity and screen time practices and preschool children’s (3–5 years old) physical activity.

Methods:

Data were from 50 child-care centers in North Carolina. Center directors reported on the presence/absence of written policies. Trained research assistants observed physical activity and screen time practices in at least 1 preschool classroom across 3 to 4 days. Children (N = 544) wore accelerometers to provide an objective measure of physical activity.

Results:

Physical activity and screen time policies varied across centers. Observational data showed 82.7 min/d of active play opportunities were provided to children. Screen time provided did not exceed 30 min/d/child at 98% of centers. Accelerometer data showed children spent 38 min/d in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and 206 min/d in sedentary activity. Policies about staff supervision of media use were negatively associated with screen time (P < .05). Contrary to expectation, policies about physical activity were associated with less time in physical activity.

Conclusions:

Clear strategies are needed for translating physical activity policies to practice. Further research is needed to evaluate the quality of physical activity policies, their impact on practice, and ease of operationalization.

Restricted access

Sarah C. Ball, Matthew W. Gillman, Meghan Mayhew, Rebecca J. Namenek Brouwer and Sara E. Benjamin Neelon

Background:

Young children’s physical activity (PA) is influenced by their child care environment. This study assessed PA practices in centers from Massachusetts (MA) and Rhode Island (RI), compared them to best practice recommendations, and assessed differences between states and center profit status. We also assessed weather-related practices.

Methods:

Sixty percent of MA and 54% of RI directors returned a survey, for a total of 254. Recommendations were 1) daily outdoor play, 2) providing outdoor play area, 3) limiting fixed play structures, 4) variety of portable play equipment, and 5) providing indoor play area. We fit multivariable linear regression models to examine adjusted associations between state, profit status, PA, and weather-related practices.

Results:

MA did not differ from RI in meeting PA recommendations (β = 0.03; 0.15, 0.21; P = .72), but MA centers scored higher on weather-related practices (β = 0.47; 0.16, 0.79; P = .004). For-profit centers had lower PA scores compared with nonprofits (β = −0.20; 95% CI: −0.38, −0.02; P = .03), but they did not differ for weather (β = 0.12; −0.19, 0.44; P = .44).

Conclusions:

More MA centers allowed children outside in light rain or snow. For-profit centers had more equipment—both fixed and portable. Results from this study may help inform interventions to increase PA in children.

Full access

Angie L.I. Cradock, Emily M. O'Donnell, Sara E. Benjamin, Elizabeth Walker and Meghan Slining

Background:

As interventions increasingly emphasize early child care settings, it is necessary to understand the state regulatory context that provides guidelines for outdoor physical activity and safety and sets standards for child care environments.

Methods:

Researchers reviewed regulations for child care facilities for 50 states, the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands. We compared state regulations with national standards for 17 physical activity- and safety-related items for outdoor playground settings outlined in Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs (CFOC). State regulations were coded as fully, partially or not addressing the CFOC standard and state-level summary scores were calculated.

Results:

On average, state regulations fully addressed one-third of 17 CFOC standards in regulations for centers (34%) and family child care homes (27%). Data suggest insufficient attention to outdoor play area proximity and size, equipment height, surfacing, and inspections.

Conclusions:

Considerable variation exists among state regulations related to physical activity promotion and injury prevention within outdoor play areas. Many states' regulations do not comply with published national health and safety standards. Enhancing regulations is one component of a policy approach to promoting safe, physically active child care settings.

Restricted access

Sofiya Alhassan, Christine W. St. Laurent and Sarah Burkart

The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of physical activity (PA) interventions in African American and Latino/Hispanic preschool children. A systematic search was conducted for English-language printed research articles published between January 1980 and December 2017. The inclusion criteria for studies in this review were that they were experimental PA studies conducted in the preschool setting in the United States that targeted African American/Black or Latino/Hispanic children between the ages of 2.9 and 5 years. A total of 1,533 articles were located, of which 10 met the inclusion criteria. Overall, studies reported positive changes in preschool-day PA levels, yet only 2 reported significant improvements in total daily PA. Limited scientific literature suggests that preschool-based interventions are effective in improving aspects of PA during the preschool day for children of color. However, minimal evidence exists on the effectiveness of these interventions in changing total daily PA.

Restricted access

Valerie Carson

Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parental support and children’s physical activity outside of child care, and whether children’s age or sex moderated the associations.

Methods:

Results are based on 93 children aged 19 to 60 months at baseline from 8 child care centers across Alberta, Canada. Parental support (ie, transportation, coactivity, watching, encouragement, and informing) and children’s physical activity outside of child care were measured with a parental questionnaire at baseline (October/November 2013) and follow-up (May/June 2014).

Results:

Every additional unit increase in parental support was significantly associated with 48.5 minutes/week [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 29.3–67.6] and 52.2 (95% CI: 32.0–72.3) minutes/week higher parental reported children’s physical activity outside of child care at baseline and follow-up, respectively. A 1-unit increase in parental support from baseline to follow-up was significantly associated with a 24.8 (95% CI: 2.8–46.8) minutes/week increase in parental reported children’s physical activity outside of child care. Children’s age was a moderator at baseline only.

Conclusions:

Parental support was positively associated with children’s physical activity across all analyses. Parental support may be an important correlate to target in future interventions aiming to promote physical activity in the early years.

Restricted access

Danae Dinkel, Dipti Dev, Yage Guo, Emily Hulse, Zainab Rida, Ami Sedani and Brian Coyle

activity and nutrition policies and practices in child care centers and homes using a 5-step approach. 4 , 9 , 10 Go NAP SACC offers training and resources to early care and education providers to achieve best practices in 5 core areas: (1) child nutrition, (2) breastfeeding and infant feeding, (3) infant

Restricted access

Stephanie Mazzucca, Derek Hales, Kelly R. Evenson, Alice Ammerman, Deborah F. Tate, Diane C. Berry and Dianne S. Ward

(centers) in the classroom], and outdoor play time. To develop sustainable physical activity interventions for child-care centers, it is important to understand how ECE teachers allocate time for these classroom activities and children’s physical activity levels during these activities. For example

Restricted access

Ali Brian, Adam Pennell, Ryan Sacko and Michaela Schenkelburg

this sample stated there was a policy solely for unstructured PA. Unstructured PA, as a school policy in South Carolina, may not actually be written in or implemented as a school-wide policy, as only 56% of child care centers in North Carolina had a written PA policy ( McWilliams et al., 2009 ). Thus

Restricted access

Stephanie Mazzucca, Cody Neshteruk, Regan Burney, Amber E. Vaughn, Derek Hales, Truls Østbye and Dianne Ward

). Most available research has come from studies in child care centers, the most common form of ECE program. Centers are typically larger organizations where providers care for children of a similar, narrow developmental range in separate classrooms. Studies with family child care homes (FCCHs) are very

Restricted access

Chelsea L. Kracht, Elizabeth K. Webster and Amanda E. Staiano

: 28666428 doi:10.1186/s12889-017-4521-3 10.1186/s12889-017-4521-3 28666428 23. Sisson SB , Stoner J , Li J , et al . Tribally affiliated child-care center environment and obesogenic behaviors in young children . J Acad Nutr Diet . 2017 ; 117 ( 3 ): 433 – 440 . PubMed ID: 27927584 doi:10.1016/j