Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 336 items for :

  • "child development" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Associations Between Kindergarten Participation in Organized Physical Activity and Subsequent Healthy Body Weight and Leg Strength by the End of Second Grade

Laurie-Anne Kosak, Kianoush Harandian, Marie-Josée Harbec, and Linda S. Pagani

the form of structured activity (eg, dance, gymnastics, martial arts), or unstructured activities requiring movement and resistance (eg, free active play, street sport, gardening). Despite the considerable body of research showing the importance of physical activity on child development, only 42% of

Full access

Effects of Regular Exercise During Pregnancy on Early Childhood Neurodevelopment: The Physical Activity for Mothers Enrolled in Longitudinal Analysis Randomized Controlled Trial

Otávio Amaral de Andrade Leão, Marlos Rodrigues Domingues, Andréa Dâmaso Bertoldi, Luiza Isnardi Cardoso Ricardo, Werner de Andrade Müller, Luciana Tornquist, Rafaela Costa Martins, Joseph Murray, Mariângela Freitas Silveira, Inácio Crochemore-Silva, Pedro Curi Hallal, and Gregore Iven Mielke

Inventory: Examiner’s Manual . Allen, TX : DLMeaching Resources ; 1988 . 29. Barros AJ , Matijasevich A , Santos IS , Halpern R . Child development in a birth cohort: effect of child stimulation is stronger in less educated mothers . Int J Epidemiol . 2010 ; 39 ( 1 ): 285 – 294 . PubMed ID

Restricted access

Is Just Moving Enough for Girls? The Moderation Role of Gross Motor Development Level in the Association Between Physical Activity and Cognition

Jacqueline Páez-Herrera, Juan Hurtado-Almonacid, Julio B. Mello, Catalina Sobarzo, Paula Plaza-Arancibia, Juliana Kain-Berkovic, Barbara Leyton, Johana Soto-Sánchez, Verónica Leiva–Guerrero, and Albert Batalla–Flores

activity across the lifespan . Sports Medicine, 48 ( 7 ), 1533 – 1540 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-0892-6 Kim , H. , Duran , C.A.K. , Cameron , C.E. , & Grissmer , D. ( 2018 ). Developmental relations among motor and cognitive processes and mathematics skills . Child Development

Restricted access

The Association Between Preschooler Physical Activity Duration and Intensity and Social Emotional Development: Findings From the PLAYCE Study

Hayley E. Christian, Leanne Lester, Mohamed K. Al Marzooqi, Stewart G. Trost, and Alana Papageorgiou

different domains of child development. Our findings add to this evidence base by highlighting that preschoolers’ time spent, not just meeting PA guidelines, in different intensities of PA is important for children’s social emotional development. Overall, moderate-intensity PA may provide the most benefit

Open access

Motor Competence Among Children in the United Kingdom and Ireland: An Expert Statement on Behalf of the International Motor Development Research Consortium

Michael J. Duncan, Lawrence Foweather, Farid Bardid, Anna L. Barnett, James Rudd, Wesley O’Brien, Jonathan D. Foulkes, Clare Roscoe, Johann Issartel, Gareth Stratton, and Cain C.T. Clark

The United Kingdom and Ireland have a well-established research base in motor competence (MC) research, ranging from reporting and monitoring levels of MC, developing assessment tools for MC, providing innovative curriculum and intervention design to support learning and development, as well as providing advocacy for particular groups, such as those with motor impairments. This expert statement, on behalf of the International Motor Development Research Consortium, draws together what is currently known about levels of MC in the United Kingdom and Ireland as well as current approaches to intervention in both countries. Subsequently presented are recommendations for researchers and practitioners to advance the field of MC for the benefit of children and youth in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and worldwide.

Restricted access

Associations Between Physical Fitness and Children’s Psychological Well-Being

Timothy LaVigne, Betsy Hoza, Alan L. Smith, Erin K. Shoulberg, and William Bukowski

We examined the relation between physical fitness and psychological well-being in children ages 10–14 years (N = 222), and the potential moderation of this relation by sex. Participants completed a physical fitness assessment comprised of seven tasks and a diverse set of self-report well-being measures assessing depressive symptoms, loneliness, and competence. Peers reported on social status and teachers rated adaptive functioning, internalizing symptoms, and externalizing symptoms. Multiple regression analyses indicated a significant association between physical fitness and psychological well-being for both boys and girls. Higher levels of physical fitness were associated with lower levels of peer dyadic loneliness and fewer depressive symptoms; greater cognitive, social, and athletic competence; greater feelings of self-worth; and better teacher reports of adaptive functioning. An interaction between internalizing and sex indicated a significant and negative association between physical fitness and internalizing symptoms for males only. No other moderation effects by sex were observed. Results suggest that physical fitness is associated with a range of well-being indicators for both boys and girls in this age group.

Restricted access

A Systematic Review of the End-State Comfort Effect in Normally Developing Children and in Children With Developmental Disorders

Kathrin Wunsch, Anne Henning, Gisa Aschersleben, and Matthias Weigelt

The end-state comfort (ESC) effect signifies the tendency to avoid uncomfortable postures at the end of goal-directed movements and can be reliably observed during object manipulation in adults, but only little is known about its development in children. The aim of the present paper is to provide a review of research on the ESC effect in normally developing children and in children with various developmental disorders, and to identify the factors constraining anticipatory planning skills. Three databases (Medline, Scopus, and PubMed) and relevant journals were scrutinized and a step-wise analysis procedure was employed to identify the relevant studies. Thirteen studies assessed the ESC effect in children, ranging from 1.5–14 years of age. Nine out of these thirteen studies reported the ESC effect to be present in normally developing children, but the results are inconsistent with regard to children’s age and the kind of ESC task used. Some evidence even suggests that these planning skills are intact in children with developmental disorders. Inconsistencies between findings are discussed in the light of moderating factors like the number of action steps, precision requirements, familiarity with the task, the task procedure, motivation, sample size, and age, as well as the cognitive and motor development of the participants. Further research is needed to investigate the onset and the developmental course of ESC planning, as well as the interdependencies with other cognitive abilities and sensory-motor skills.

Open access

Interrater Reliability of the Test of Gross Motor Development—Third Edition Following Raters’ Agreement on Measurement Criteria

Aida Carballo-Fazanes, Ezequiel Rey, Nadia C. Valentini, Cristina Varela-Casal, and Cristian Abelairas-Gómez

We aimed to calculate interrater reliability of the Test of Gross Motor Development—Third Edition (TGMD-3) after raters reached a consensus regarding measurement criteria. Three raters measured the fundamental movement skills of 25 children on the TGMD-3 at two different times: (a) once when simply following the measurement criteria in the TGMD-3 manual and (b) after a 9-month washout period, following the raters’ consensus building for the measurement criteria for each skill. After calculating and comparing the interrater reliability of these three raters across these two rating times, we found improved interrater reliability after the raters’ consensus-building discussions on ratings of both locomotor skills (moderate-to-good reliability on two of six skills initially and at least moderate-to-excellent on four of six skills following criteria consensus building) and ball skills (moderate-to-good reliability on one of seven skills initially and at least moderate-to-excellent reliability on four of seven skills following criteria consensus building). For subtest scores and overall test scores, raters achieved at least moderate-to-good reliability on their second, postconsensus-building ratings. Based on this improved reliability following consensus building, we recommend that researchers include rater consensus building before assessing children’s fundamental movement skills or guiding curriculum interventions in physical education from TGMD-3 data.

Restricted access

Bimanual Coordination Development Is Enhanced in Young Females and Experienced Athletes

David Albines, Joshua A. Granek, Diana J. Gorbet, and Lauren E. Sergio

We characterize bimanual coordination development for the first time in a large sample of children (n = 303) in relation to age, sex, and athletic experience. A further aim is to document the effect of these factors on development to indirectly gain insight into the neural processes that underlie this advanced level of eye–hand coordination. This was a cross-sectional design involving three age groups (range: 9–15 years) that were further separated by sex and level of athletic experience. Participants completed two bimanual tasks and a unimanual control task. While there was no significant change in unimanual movement speed, we observed that females performed the bimanual tasks faster, compared with males. Further, we found that select-level athletes had superior bimanual abilities. Lastly, we found an interaction of sex and skill across age. All groups achieved significant improvement in bimanual coordination with the exception of nonselect males. These data provide a description of normal bimanual coordination development in children during the developmentally crucial ages of 9–15 years, taking account of sex- and experience-related differences.

Restricted access

A Systematic Review of the Relationships Between Physical Activity and Sleep in Early Childhood

Christine W. St. Laurent, Katrina Rodheim, and Rebecca M.C. Spencer

recommendations and intervention strategies for healthier child development. Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank Ellen Lutz from the University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries for her assistance in the development and review of the study’s methodology. This work was funded in part by the National