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Jennifer Ann McGetrick, Krystyna Kongats, Kim D. Raine, Corinne Voyer, and Candace I.J. Nykiforuk

, it is essential for chronic disease prevention advocates to understand policy influencers’ preferences for the acceptability of various means in promoting population-level physical activity. Similarly, it is essential that advocates further understand preferences for the acceptability of

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Catherine E. Draper, Tracy L. Kolbe-Alexander, and Estelle V. Lambert

Background:

The Community Health Intervention Programmes (CHIPs) is a physical activity-based health promotion program operating in disadvantaged communities in the Western Cape, South Africa with primary school learners, adults and senior adults. Program growth, anecdotal evidence and experience of those involved suggest the program has been positively received by communities. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative, retrospective process evaluation concerning both factors associated with successful implementation of the programs, and implementation challenges.

Methods:

‘Success’ was defined in consultation with CHIPs staff and stakeholders. Data were gathered through naturalistic observation, structured interviews and focus groups (n = 104), and open-ended questionnaires (n = 81). The sample included CHIPs staff and stakeholders, program members and leaders.

Results:

Factors contributing to the program’s success include: focus on combining social development and exercise science, community development model, scientifically sound program content, appropriate activities, intrapersonal and interpersonal factors, program leadership, encouraging staff, and various contextual factors.

Conclusions:

The findings confirm that CHIPs presents a model of sustainable implementation of physical activity in disadvantaged communities, and that it positively impacts the quality of life, perceptions of the role of physical activity in health, and personal responsibility for health of those involved in its programs.

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Cora Lynn Craig

Background:

Low levels of physical activity (PA) and fitness have long been a government concern in Canada; however, more than half of adults are inactive. This article examines factors influencing policy development and implementation using Canadian PA policy as a case study.

Methods:

Current and historical PA policy documents were amassed from a literature review, audit of government and non government websites and from requests to government officials in each jurisdiction directly responsible for PA. These were analyzed to determine policy content, results, barriers, and success factors.

Results:

The national focus for PA policy in Canada has devolved to a multilevel system that meets most established criteria for successful strategies. Earlier PA targets have been met; however, the prevalence of PA decreased from 2005 to 2007. Annual per capita savings in health care associated with achieving the earlier target is estimated at $6.15 per capita, yet a fraction of that is directed to promoting PA.

Conclusion:

Evidenced-based strategies that address multiple policy agendas using sector-specific approaches are needed. Sustained high-level commitment is required; advocacy grounded in metrics and science is needed to increase the profile of the issue and increase the commitments to PA policies in Canada and internationally.

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Bradley J. Cardinal, Eugene A. Park, MooSong Kim, and Marita K. Cardinal

Background:

This study provides an update on the amount and type of physical activity education occurring in medical education in the United States in 2013. It is the first study to do so since 2002.

Methods:

Applying content analysis methodology, we reviewed all accessible accredited doctor of medicine and doctor of osteopathic medicine institutions’ websites for physical activity education related coursework (N = 118 fully accessible; 69.41%).

Results:

The majority of institutions did not offer any physical activity education–related courses. When offered, they were rarely required. Courses addressing sports medicine and exercise physiology were offered more than courses in other content domains. Most courses were taught using a clinical approach. No differences were observed between MD and DO institutions, or between private and public institutions.

Conclusions:

More than one-half of the physicians trained in the United States in 2013 received no formal education in physical activity and may, therefore, be ill-prepared to assist their patients in a manner consistent with Healthy People 2020, the National Physical Activity Plan, or the Exercise is Medicine initiative. The Bipartisan Policy Center, American College of Sports Medicine, and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation called for a reversal of this situation on June 23, 2014.

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and Prevention’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Guest Editors: Pedro C. Hallal, Ross C. Brownson, and Michael Pratt Commentary 10.1123/jpah.7.s2.s129 Research 10.1123/jpah.7.s2.s131 10.1123/jpah.7.s2.s135 Original Research 10.1123/jpah.7.s2.s137 Research 10

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Emily N. Ussery, John D. Omura, Kelly McCain, and Kathleen B. Watson

Ussery, Omura, and Watson are with the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity; National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Atlanta, GA, USA. McCain is with the Geospatial Research, Analysis, and Services Program; Agency

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Wei Gao and Keqiang Cao

urban citizens; the increase is having major ramifications on physical activity promotion and chronic disease prevention. There were approximately 12 sports venues for every 10,000 persons, or 1.46 m 2 of activity space for every person. 4 Therefore, increasing new sports facilities, opening more

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Damián Iglesias, Javier Fernandez-Rio, and Pablo Rodríguez-González

MVPA for at least 50% of their lesson time ( Association for Physical Education [AFPE], 2017 ; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Prevention, and Division of Adolescent and School Health

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Kelly Cornett, Katherine Bray-Simons, Heather M. Devlin, Sunil Iyengar, Patricia Moore Shaffer, and Janet E. Fulton

Increasing physical activity in communities is a key public health strategy for chronic disease prevention and health promotion. Very few Americans get the minimum amount of physical activity necessary for substantial health benefits. 1 Activity-friendly communities make physical activity easier

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Deborah Salvo, Andrea Ramírez Varela, and Alejandra Jáuregui

empowerment and growth that has resulted from it among the cohort of Latin American investigators involved, has aided in increasing the recognition of physical inactivity as a critical risk factor for chronic disease prevention in the region. Altogether, this has led to the recent emergence of Latin American