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Peter A. Hastie, Oleg A. Sinelnikov, Sheri J. Brock, Tom L. Sharpe, Kim Eiler and Claire Mowling

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Zachary Wahl-Alexander and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

The classroom ecology paradigm ( Doyle, 1977 , 1979 ) is a theoretical lens that has been used to examine why some physical education teachers are more effective than others in terms of facilitating student work and the nature of work that is completed in physical education classes ( Hastie

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Salee Supaporn, Patt Dodds and Linda Griffin

This study was designed to investigate how the classroom ecology (interactions among task systems) and program of action influence participants’ understandings of misbehavior in a middle school physical education setting. One teacher and 14 students participated in a 10-day basketball unit with 47- minute classes. Data included fieldnotes, stimulated recall using videotapes, and semi-structured teacher and student pre- and post-unit interviews. Data were first analyzed inductively by constant comparison (Strauss & Corbin, 1998) and then by using Doyle’s (1986) classroom ecology model to understand the inductively generated categories. Data trustworthiness involved prolonged engagement, member checks, and triangulation. Results indicated that the teacher’s weak managerial task system, coupled with vague and incomplete instructional tasks, interacted with a student social system grounded in various forms of talk as social tasks to support a social program of action. Both teacher and student actions jointly created a primary social vector characterizing the overall program of action.

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Jooyeon Jin and Joonkoo Yun

The purpose of this study was to examine three frameworks, (a) process-product, (b) student mediation, and (c) classroom ecology, to understand physical activity (PA) behavior of adolescents with and without disabilities in middle school inclusive physical education (PE). A total of 13 physical educators teaching inclusive PE and their 503 students, including 22 students with different disabilities, participated in this study. A series of multilevel regression analyses indicated that physical educators’ teaching behavior and students’ implementation intentions play important roles in promoting the students’ PA in middle school inclusive PE settings when gender, disability, lesson content, instructional model, and class location are considered simultaneously. The findings suggest that the ecological framework should be considered to effectively promote PA of adolescents with and without disabilities in middle school PE classes.

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Kelsey McEntyre, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith and Deborah S. Baxter

and analysis during this study was the classroom ecology paradigm ( Doyle, 1977 , 1979 , 2005 ). Classroom ecology is a theoretical lens that has been used to examine teacher effectiveness. It is concerned with the tasks that students are asked to complete, the formal (e.g., examinations, tests, and

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Kelsey McEntyre, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith and K. Andrew R. Richards

The classroom ecology paradigm ( Doyle, 1977 , 1979 , 2005 ) has provided a theoretical lens that can be used to help both inservice and preservice teachers (PTs) improve their effectiveness. The key objective of the paradigm is to discover how order and cooperation are established between

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Alisa R. James, Linda L. Griffin and Patt Dodds

The purpose of the study was to examine the ecologies of two teachers and the extent that each teacher’s agenda aligned with instructional activities and assessments for each unit of instruction. Data were collected in four ways: (1) videotaped record of each lesson, (2) live observation field notes and expanded field notes from the videotape, (3) formal and informal interviews, and (4) document data. Field note data were analyzed inductively and excerpted into meaningful units that demonstrated aspects of the classroom ecology and instructional alignment. Interview data were analyzed qualitatively through constant comparison. Results indicated that the teachers had differing agendas for the units of instruction. The differences in their agendas resulted in different classroom ecologies and a weakened program of action. The teachers shifted their espoused agendas (focus on student learning) to an enacted agenda that focused on safety and completing tasks. As a result of this shift, the focus of each teacher’s agenda was not assessed in the manner that they had espoused. Consequently, there was no instructional alignment between the teachers’ espoused agenda, lesson tasks, and assessments.

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Risto Marttinen, Dillon Landi, Dario Novak and Stephen Silverman

 Intact, Random, N/A, Not reported Specific Focus (check at that apply)  Motor Skill, Teacher Attitude, Student Attitude, Student Perceptions, Teacher Perceptions, Knowledge, PA, Fitness, Teacher Process, Student Process, Student Misbehavior, Motivation, Bullying, Teacher Burnout, Classroom Ecology, Other

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Zachary Wahl-Alexander, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

The classroom ecology paradigm ( Doyle, 1979 , 1986 ) has provided a useful framework for studying, understanding, and improving teaching. The main goal of scholars working within this paradigm has been to examine and describe how cooperation between teachers and students is established which

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Rosalie Coolkens, Phillip Ward, Jan Seghers and Peter Iserbyt

.0649 36. Doyle W . Content representation in teachers’ definitions of academic work . J Curric Stud . 1986 ; 18 ( 4 ): 365 – 379 . doi:10.1080/0022027860180402 10.1080/0022027860180402 37. Hastie PA , Siedentop D . The classroom ecology paradigm . In: Kirk D , Macdonald D , O’ Sullivan