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Carolee Winstein

Over the past decade, there have been nine moderate-sized to large-scale nonpharmacologic neurorehabilitation recovery clinical trials. The majority of these trials which tested the superiority of a particular evidence-based therapeutic intervention, returned results that did not support the

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Gabriela Souza de Vasconcelos, Anelize Cini and Cláudia Silveira Lima

proprioceptive training program on dynamic neuromuscular control in fencing athletes. The study hypothesis was that participants who receive the proprioceptive training program would show significant improvement in the SEBT range. Methods Study Design The present study is a clinical trial. This study was

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Cristiane B.B. Antonelli, Charlini S. Hartz, Sileno da Silva Santos and Marlene A. Moreno

project was approved by the Methodist University of Piracicaba (UNIMEP) ethics in research committee of the institution (CAAE 78248317.0.00005507), and it was published in the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (RBR-5sgsxb) Design This study was a blinded, randomized clinical trial. Seventeen athletes

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Sahba Taslimipour, Zahra Rojhani-Shirazi, Ladan Hemmati and Iman Rezaei

respiratory parameters in women with THK. The effects of VR on postural alignment and the possible relationship between these effects and changes in respiratory parameters have not been investigated in previous studies. Methods Study Design We registered this randomized clinical trial at the Iranian Registry

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Natália Barros Beltrão, Camila Ximenes Santos, Valéria Mayaly Alves de Oliveira, André Luiz Torres Pirauá, David Behm, Ana Carolina Rodarti Pitangui and Rodrigo Cappato de Araújo

calculation for a clinical trial on parallel groups with superior continuous outcomes, and having ROM as the main variable. All participants were aged between 18 and 30 years, able to practice physical activities (identified through the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire), and were untrained at

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Aydan Aytar, Gul Baltaci, Tim Uhl, Handan Tuzun, Pinar Oztop and Metin Karatas

Objective:

To determine the effects of scapular mobilization on function, pain, range of motion, and satisfaction in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS).

Design:

Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Setting:

University hospital clinics in Turkey.

Participants:

66 participants (mean ± SD age 52.06 ± 3.71 y) with SAIS.

Interventions:

Participants were randomized into 3 groups: scapular mobilization, sham scapular mobilization, and supervised exercise. Before the interventions transcutaneous electrical stimulation and hot pack were applied to all groups. Total intervention duration for all groups was 3 wk with a total of 9 treatment sessions.

Main Outcome Measures:

Shoulder function and pain intensity were primary outcome measures; range of motion and participant satisfaction were secondary outcome measures. Shoulder function was assessed with the short form of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (DASH). A visual analog scale was used to evaluate pain severity. Active range of motion was measured with a universal goniometer. A 7-point Likert scale was used to evaluate satisfaction. Outcome measurements were performed at baseline, before visits 5 and 10, 4 wk after visit 9, and 8 wk after visit 9.

Results:

There was no group difference for DASH score (P = .75), pain at rest (P = .41), pain with activity (P = .45), pain at night (P = .74), and shoulder flexion (P = .65), external rotation (P = .63), and internal rotation (P = .19). There was a significant increase in shoulder motion and function and a significant decrease in pain across time when all groups were combined (P < .001). The level of satisfaction was not significantly different for any of the questions about participant satisfaction between all groups (P > .05).

Conclusion:

There was not a significant advantage of scapular mobilization for shoulder function, pain, range of motion, and satisfaction compared with sham or supervised-exercise groups in patients with SAIS.

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Jack M. Guralnik, Suzanne Leveille, Stefano Volpato, Marcia S. Marx and Jiska Cohen-Mansfield

Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that, using objective performance measures of physical functioning, disability risk can be predicted in nondisabled older adults. This makes it possible to recruit a nondisabled but at-risk population for clinical trials of disability prevention. Successful disability prevention in this population, for example through an exercise program, would have a major public health impact. To enhance the development of exercise interventions in this group it would be valuable to have additional information not available from existing epidemiologic studies. This report examines the evidence that functional limitations preceding disability can be identified in a community-dwelling population and that it is feasible to recruit these people into studies. It introduces a series of articles examining the characteristics of this population: motivators and barriers to exercise, exercise habits and preferences, the impact of positive and negative affect, and the impact of pain and functional limitations on attitudes toward exercise.

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Jacqueline Vieira de Castro, Karina Costa Machado, Kelly Scaramussa and João Luiz Ellera Gomes

Context:

After years of focusing on the management of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, the most common soccer-related injuries, the orthopedic community has concluded that soccer players have a wide range of variation in joint biomechanics and has thus started to focus research efforts on the morphological factors that might contribute to ACL trauma. One such factor is decreased hip-rotation range of motion (ROM), which may be due to compensatory musculoskeletal changes occurring in response to longstanding soccer practice since childhood.

Objective:

This study sought to assess decreased hip rotation and the influence of stretching exercises on the behavior of the hip joint in players of the youth soccer categories of a Brazilian soccer team.

Design:

Randomized clinical trial.

Setting:

University hospital.

Patients:

262 male soccer players.

Interventions:

Subjects were randomly allocated into 2 groups—control or a stretching program.

Main Outcome Measures:

Subjects were reassessed after 12 wk.

Results:

The findings suggest that hip-rotation ROM decreases over the years in soccer players. In the study sample, adherence to a stretching program improved only external hip-rotation ROM in the nondominant limb.

Conclusion:

Playing soccer can restrict rotation ROM of the hip, and adherence to stretching exercises may decrease the harmful effects on the hip joints.

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Jesse C. Christensen, Laura R. Goldfine and Hugh S. West

Study Design:

Prospective randomized clinical trial.

Methods and Measures:

Thirty-six patients who had a primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) with a semitendinosus-gracilis (STG) autograft from a single orthopedic surgeon were prospectively randomized into 2 groups. Nineteen patients were randomized to the aggressive group (53% male, mean age 30.1 + 10.5 y) and 17 to the nonaggressive group (88% male, mean age 33.1 + 10.9 y). Impairment measures of anteroposterior (A-P) knee laxity, range of motion (ROM), and peak isometric force (PIF) values were obtained 12 wk postoperatively. Subjective response to the International Knee Documentation Committee knee form (IKDC) was collected 1, 12, and 24 wk postoperatively. One-way ANOVA was used to analyze differences between groups at 12 wk for A-P knee laxity, ROM, and PIF. Differences between the groups for the IKDC scores were determined using 1-way ANOVA with repeated measures 1, 12, and 24 wk postoperatively. Bonferroni adjustment was used for multiple comparisons.

Results:

There were no differences between the groups for the baseline characteristics (P > .05). There was no difference found between the groups in respect to A-P knee laxity, ROM, or PIF at 12 wk (P > .05). Further analysis also showed no significant differences in the IKDC scores between groups at 12 or 24 wk (P > .05).

Conclusions:

No differences were found between early aggressive and nonaggressive rehabilitation after an isolated ACL-R using STG autografts for the primary outcomes of A-P knee laxity and subjective IKDC score. In addition, no differences were observed for secondary outcomes between groups for differences in ROM and PIF values.

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Miguel A. Sanchez-Lastra, Antonio J. Molina, Vicente Martin, Tania Fernández-Villa, Jose M. Cancela and Carlos Ayan

resistance training on neuromuscular parameters in elderly with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized clinical trial . Experimental Gerontology, 113, 141 – 149 . PubMed ID: 30296453 doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2018.10.001 Brown , M. , Sinacore , D.R. , Ehsani , A.A. , Binder , E.F. , Holloszy , J