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A Method for Classifying Co-contraction of Lumbar Muscle Activity

Richard E. Hughes, James C. Bean, and Don B. Chaffin

Concurrent activation of muscles on opposite sides of joints is a common phenomenon. In simple planar mechanical systems, it is easy to identify such an electromyographic pattern as co-contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles. In complex 3-D systems such as the lumbar spine, it is more difficult to precisely identify whether EMG recordings represent co-contraction. Qualitative definitions of antagonist muscles emphasize that their actions wholly oppose the action of the prime movers. The qualitative definition of antagonist muscles was used to formulate a mathematical requirement for there to be co-contraction of agonists and antagonists. It was shown that the definition of co-contraction implies muscle activity beyond what is required to maintain equilibrium. The method was illustrated by classifying EMG recordings made of the lumbar region musculature during tasks involving combined torso extension and axial twisting loads. The method, which identified muscle activity in excess of that required to maintain static equilibrium, could be used to identify conditions in which muscle activation is required for something other than merely maintaining moment equilibrium.

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Postural Sway and Muscle Activity Dynamics of Upright Standing on Sloped Surfaces

Jacey Baldridge and Adam C. King

standing depends, in part, on the capacity of the ankle joint muscles to produce adequate torques against expected or unexpected perturbation. One postural response is the simultaneous contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles crossing the joint, commonly referred to as muscle co-contraction, and

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The Effect of Functional Knee Braces on Muscular Contributions to Joint Rotational Stiffness in Anterior Cruciate Ligament–Deficient and –Reconstructed Patients

Aaron Derouin and Jim R. Potvin

beneficial way, very few techniques are available in the literature to quantify how those modifications in lower-limb muscle activity influence rotational or translational stability of the knee. For example, the co-contraction index 6 – 11 does not consider the 3 important parameters in relation to a muscle

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Hamstring Activation During Lower Body Resistance Training Exercises

William P. Ebben

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in hamstring activation during lower body resistance training exercises. This study also sought to assess differences in hamstring-to-quadriceps muscle activation ratios and gender differences therein.

Methods:

A randomized repeated measures design was used to compare six resistance training exercises that are commonly believed to train the hamstrings, including the squat, seated leg curl, stiff leg dead lift, single leg stiff leg dead lift, good morning, and Russian curl. Subjects included 34 college athletes. Outcome measures included the biceps femoris (H) and rectus femoris (Q) electromyography (EMG) and the H-to-Q EMG ratio, for each exercise.

Results:

Main effects were found for the H (P < 0.001) and Q (P < 0.001). Post hoc analysis identified the specific differences between exercises. In addition, main effects were found for the H-to-Q ratio when analyzed for all subjects (P < 0.001). Further analysis revealed that women achieved between 53.9 to 89.5% of the H-to-Q activation ratios of men, for the exercises assessed. In a separate analysis of strength matched women and men, women achieved between 35.9 to 76.0% of the H-to-Q ratios of men, for these exercises.

Conclusions:

Hamstring resistance training exercises offer differing degrees of H and Q activation and ratios. Women compared with men, are less able to activate the hamstrings and/or more able to activate the quadriceps. Women may require disproportionately greater training for the hamstrings compared with the quadriceps.

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Preferential Quadriceps Activation in Female Athletes With Incremental Increases in Landing Intensity

Kevin R. Ford, Gregory D. Myer, Laura C. Schmitt, Timothy L. Uhl, and Timothy E. Hewett

The purpose of this study was to identify alterations in preparatory muscle activation patterns across different drop heights in female athletes. Sixteen female high school volleyball players performed the drop vertical jump from three different drop heights. Surface electromyography of the quadriceps and hamstrings were collected during the movement trials. As the drop height increased, muscle activation of the quadriceps during preparatory phase also increased (p < .05). However, the hamstrings activation showed no similar increases relative to drop height. Female athletes appear to preferentially rely on increased quadriceps activation, without an increase in hamstrings activation, with increased plyometric intensity. The resultant decreased activation ratio of the hamstrings relative to quadriceps before landing may represent altered dynamic knee stability and may contribute to the increased risk of ACL injury in female athletes.

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Effect of Submaximal Repetitive Exercise on Knee Coactivation in Young and Middle-Aged Women

Joanne N. Hodder, Tova E. Plashkes, Regan A. Franklin, Heather K. Hickey, and Monica R. Maly

Coactivation of the knee extensors and flexors increases knee joint contact forces, which may lead to degradation of the articular surfaces. This study investigated the effect of neuromuscular fatigue induced by submaximal, repetitive, dynamic contractions on coactivation of knee musculature in young and middle-aged women. Data from 10 young women (24.6 ± 1.8 years) and 8 middle-aged women (55.4 ± 4.2 years) were analyzed. Measures included peak knee extension and flexion torques and the average amplitude of surface electromyography of rectus femoris and biceps femoris. Coactivation ratios were calculated from these activations. To induce fatigue, participants completed up to ten sets of 50 concentric knee extension and flexion contractions at 60°/s. A two-factor analysis of variance was used to determine the effect of age and fatigue. The young group showed higher peak torque compared with the middle-aged group (P < .001). During flexion, biceps femoris activity increased after fatigue when both groups were considered together (P = .018). During extension, biceps femoris activity was higher in the middle-aged than young group (P = .043). Middle-aged women exhibited a trend for greater coactivation during knee extension compared with young women (P = .066). This coactivation likely contributed to extension torque decrements in middle-aged women.

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Prolonged Standing-Induced Low Back Pain Is Linked to Extended Lumbar Spine Postures: A Study Linking Lumped Lumbar Spine Passive Stiffness to Standing Posture

Kayla M. Fewster, Kaitlin M. Gallagher, and Jack P. Callaghan

demonstrate increased bilateral gluteus medius muscle co-activation throughout prolonged standing. 5 In comparison to non-PDs, PDs display increased gluteus medius co-contraction indexes 23 as well as increased and positive cross-correlations between the right and left gluteus muscles. 3 This co

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Muscle Activation in the Shoulder Girdle and Lumbopelvic-Hip Complex During Common Therapeutic Exercises

Luk Devorski, David M. Bazett-Jones, L. Colby Mangum, and Neal R. Glaviano

exercises to target isolated muscles or target co-contraction of the LPHC. The multiple LPHC exercises available allow practitioners the ability to challenge the LPHC musculature while recognizing which LPHC exercises result in pain and discomfort. These characteristics of exercise selection will enable the

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Trunk Postural Muscle Timing Is Not Compromised In Low Back Pain Patients Clinically Diagnosed With Movement Coordination Impairments

Rupal Mehta, Marco Cannella, Sharon M. Henry, Susan Smith, Simon Giszter, and Sheri P. Silfies

Trunk muscle timing impairment has been associated with nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP), but this finding has not been consistent. This study investigated trunk muscle timing in a subgroup of patients with NSLBP attributed to movement coordination impairment (MCI) and matched asymptomatic controls in response to a rapid arm-raising task. Twenty-one NSLBP subjects and 21 matched controls had arm motion and surface EMG data collected from seven bilateral trunk muscles. Muscle onset and offset relative to deltoid muscle activation and arm motion, duration of muscle burst and abdominal–extensor co-contraction time were derived. Trunk muscle onset and offset latencies, and burst and co-contraction durations were not different (p > .05) between groups. Patterns of trunk muscle activation and deactivation relative to arm motion were not different. Task performance was similar between groups. Trunk muscle timing does not appear to be an underlying impairment in the subgroup of NSLBP with MCI.

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Errors in Force Generation and Changes in Controlling Patterns Following Agonist Muscle Fatigue

Yi-Ming Huang, Ya-Ju Chang, Miao-Ju Hsu, Chia-Ling Chen, Chia-Ying Fang, and Alice May-Kuen Wong

The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether agonist muscle fatigue changed the coactivation time and the co-contraction magnitude of the agonist and antagonist muscle, and if the agonist muscle fatigue produced bias (constant error: CE) and inconsistency (variable error: VE) of the force. Subjects are 10 healthy people and one person with impaired proprioception. EMG and force for fast (0.19 ± 0.06 s) and slow (1.20 ± 0.44 s) targeted isometric dorsiflexions were recorded before and after fatigue of the dorsiflexors. The results revealed that the coactivation time increased after fatigue only in the slow contractions but the co-contraction magnitude did not change. The postfatigue increment of the CE was greater in the fast contractions than in the slow ones. We conclude that the postfatigue compensatory strategy can reduce the fatigue-induced bias. The change of muscles activation level after fatigue might be under the influence of the common drive. Impaired proprioception is a possible cause of the fatigue-related increase in bias and inconsistency.