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Sebastián Feu, Javier García-Rubio, Antonio Antúnez, and Sergio Ibáñez

Sport and Coaches in Spain Spain is a modern nation, organized administratively in regions. The national government in the first place and the regional ones, in second place, have the authority to regulate or develop laws related to sport. The sports in schools are regionally organized, though

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Jonathan Glen, Julie Gordon, and David Lavallee

facilities as well as communal places within parks, such as playgrounds, sports courts, and outdoor gyms. In response to the measures put in place, many sports organizations initiated the delivery of remote, online coaching sessions. This involved a wide range of coaching activities, including video coaching

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Rhys J. Thurston, Danielle M. Alexander, and Mathieu Michaud

skill development, which may be challenging for children and adults with learning disabilities or neurodevelopmental disorders. In sports, learning involves developing knowledge on a technical (i.e., sport-specific skills) or tactical (i.e., understanding game plays) level. Indeed, coaches have the

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Brock McMullen, Hester L. Henderson, Donna Harp Ziegenfuss, and Maria Newton

When the relationship between a coach and an athlete is regarded as coach-athlete centered, one can gain a better understanding of coaching effectiveness and the relationship that is developed between the two parties, while also realizing the two cannot exist in isolation and need one another to

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Rachel A. Van Woezik, Alex J. Benson, and Mark W. Bruner

group has the potential to destabilize group dynamics if not managed well. Thus, it is perhaps not surprising that the interviewed athletes perceived the coaching staff to be extremely influential in how the group responded in the wake of an injury, as well as how athletes viewed the injured teammate

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Ciria Margarita Salazar C., Pedro Julian Flores Moreno, José Encarnación Del Río Valdivia, Lenin Tlamatini Barajas Pineda, Julio Alejandro Gómez Figueroa, and Martha Patricia Pérez López

The purpose of this paper is to describe the profile of coaching and coach education in Mexico. Mexico currently plays a prevailing sport role at a Pan-American level. Five types of coaches exist in Mexico: professional, amateur, personal or private, schooling and plainspeople. Each one is defined by the scopes, knowledge and its application, and sporting results achieved. The development of Mexican coaches is based on a traditional training model. It is important that coach developers in Mexico observe the progresses of countries that have advanced in the development of academic improvement programs and coach development opportunities offered through institutes of higher education.

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Sara Oliveira, Marina Cunha, António Rosado, and Cláudia Ferreira

think, feel, and behave in athletic, academic, and social domains ( Fraser-Thomas & Côté, 2009 ; Gavrilova, Donohue, & Galante, 2017 ; Rice et al., 2016 ). Difficult thoughts, emotions, and experiences, such as feelings of shame, fear of failure, injuries, the pressure to win, and perception of coach

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Mathieu Simon Paul Meeûs, Sidónio Serpa, and Bert De Cuyper

This study examined the effects of video feedback on the nonverbal behavior of handball coaches, and athletes’ and coaches’ anxieties and perceptions. One intervention group (49 participants) and one control group (63 participants) completed the Coaching Behavior Assessment System, Coaching Behavior Questionnaire, and Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 on two separate occasions, with 7 weeks of elapsed time between each administration. Coaches in the intervention condition received video feedback and a frequency table with a comparison of their personal answers and their team’s answers on the CB AS. Repeated-measures ANOVAs showed that over time, athletes in the intervention group reported significantly less anxiety and perceived their coaches significantly more positively compared with athletes in the nonintervention condition. Over time, coaches in the intervention group perceived themselves significantly more positively than coaches in the nonintervention condition. Compared with field athletes, goalkeepers were significantly more anxious and perceived their coaches less positively. It is concluded that an intervention using video feedback might have positive effects on anxiety and coach perception and that field athletes and goalkeepers possess different profiles.

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Sean P. Cumming, Ronald E. Smith, and Frank L. Smoll

For more than two decades, the behavioral categories of the Leadership Scale for Sports (LSS) and the Coaching Behavior Assessment System (CBAS) have been used by a wide range of researchers to measure coaching behaviors, yet little is known about how the behavioral categories in the two models relate statistically to one another. Male and female athletes on 63 high school teams (N = 645) completed the LSS and the athlete-perception version of the CBAS (CBAS-PBS) following the sport season, and they evaluated their coaches. Several of Chelladurai’s (1993) hypotheses regarding relations among behavioral categories of the two models were strongly supported. However, many significant and overlapping correlations between LSS subscales and CBAS-PBS behavioral categories cast doubt upon the specificity of relations between the two instruments. The LSS and the CBAS-PBS accounted for similar and notable amounts of variance in athletes’ liking for their coach and evaluations of their knowledge and teaching ability.

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Nikos Zourbanos, Antonis Hatzigeorgiadis, Nikos Tsiakaras, Stiliani Chroni, and Yannis Theodorakis

The aim of the present research was to investigate the relationship between coaching behavior and athletes’ inherent self-talk (ST). Three studies were conducted. The first study tested the construct validity of the Coaching Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ) in the Greek language, and provided support for its original factor structure. The second study examined the relationships between coaching behavior and athletes’ ST in field, with two different samples. The results showed that supportive coaching behavior was positively related to positive ST (in one sample) and negatively related to negative ST (in both samples), whereas negative coaching behavior was negatively related to positive ST (in one sample) and positively related to negative ST (in both samples). Finally, the third study examined the relationships experimentally, to produce evidence regarding the direction of causality. The results showed that variations in coaching behavior affected participants’ ST. Overall, the results of the present investigation provided considerable evidence regarding the links between coaching behavior and athletes’ ST and suggested that coaches may have an impact on athletes’ thoughts.