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Jerry Segwaba, Desiree Vardhan and Patrick Duffy

The South African government and the South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) have committed to the creation of an active and winning nation through sport. As part of the national sports plan, coaching has been identified as a key element in the success of the South African sports system. In this context, SASCOC commissioned the development of the South African Coaching Framework, which was formally launched in 2011. The development and launch of the Framework has been accompanied by the gathering of research and scoping data to inform the processes of planning, implementation and impact evaluation. This article describes the current position of coaching in South Africa and the key issues being addressed through the South African Coaching Framework. The challenges that remain to be faced in maximising the contribution of sport coaching to the sporting and social vision of the nation are also identifed.

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David P. Hedlund, Carol A. Fletcher, Simon M. Pack and Sean Dahlin

performance sport) and the important knowledge and skills sport coaches must know (e.g., professional, interpersonal and intrapersonal knowledge) to create a coaching education framework that can be used by coaching educators. Background In recent years, coaching frameworks have been produced around the world

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Lori A. Gano-Overway and Kristen Dieffenbach

Excellence (ICCE) has developed standards for higher education (HE) undergraduate programs that connect with the International Sport Coaching Framework ( Lara-Bercial et al., 2016 ). The ICCE HE standards present a set of competencies or skills for the coach to develop associated with six primary functions

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Zoe Avner, Pirkko Markula and Jim Denison

Drawing on a modified version of Foucault’s (1972) analysis of discursive formations, we selected key coach education texts in Canada to examine what discourses currently shape effective coaching in Canada in order to detect what choices Canadian coaches have to know about “being an effective coach.” We then compared the most salient aspects of our reading to the International Sport Coaching Framework. Our Foucauldian reading of the two Canadian coach education websites showed that the present set of choices for coaches to practice “effectively” is narrow and that correspondingly the potential for change and innovation is limited in scope. Our comparison with the International Sport Coaching Framework, however, showed more promise as we found that its focus on the development of coach competences allowed for different coaching knowledges and coaching aims than a narrow focus on performance and results. We then conclude this Insights Paper by offering some comments on the implications of our Foucauldian reading as well as some suggestions to address our concerns about the dominance of certain knowledges and the various effects of this dominance for athletes, coaches, coach development and the coaching profession at large.

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Michel Milistetd, Pierre Trudel, Isabel Mesquita and Juarez Vieira do Nascimento

In Brazil, contrary to the situation in many countries, sport coaching at all levels is considered a profession. Following a law passed by the government, those who want to coach are required to earn a university diploma called a ‘Bachelor in Physical Education’. This bachelor’s degree prepares future professionals to work in any of the following areas: health, leisure, and sport performance. Because universities have some fexibility regarding the courses that they offer and can also focus on one or any combination of the three aforementioned areas, we cannot assume that graduate students have acquired the same knowledge and developed the same competencies. Therefore, a broad inquiry of what is provided by different universities was needed to create a picture of the curriculum that future sport coaches will experience. In an effort to situate the Brazilian coaching and coach education system within a worldwide perspective, the data collected are interpreted using the International Sport Coaching Framework (ISCF).

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Lynn Kidman and David Keelty

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of coaching and coach development in New Zealand. For a small country with a population of 4.47 million (Statistics New Zealand, 2015), New Zealand achieves great success on the world sporting stage. One of the many contributors to this success is New Zealand’s commitment to developing coaches with an emphasis on continuous improvement through the provision of ongoing learning opportunities for coaches (SPARC, 2006). Interestingly the International Sport Coaching Framework’s recommendations aligns itself to such an emphasis that they refer to as lifelong learning (ICCE, 2013). To achieve this focus, and based on a Ministerial Taskforce findings that, “Coaching is in urgent need of support and development” (Ministerial Taskforce, 2001, p.10) Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC) established a consultancy group to review and redevelop coaching. An outcome of this consultation was the production of the New Zealand Coaching Strategy (SPARC, 2004). Based on robust discussion on many issues of how people learn and coaching development philosophies, the Coach Development Framework (CDF) was established in 2006. Since its establishment, the CDF has been guiding coach development in New Zealand, placing the responsibility for this development on the National Sporting Organisations (NSOs).

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Sergio Lara-Bercial, Andy Abraham, Pascal Colmaire, Kristen Dieffenbach, Olivia Mokglate, Steven Rynne, Alfonso Jiménez, John Bales, José Curado, Masamitsu Ito and Lutz Nordmann

Sport coaching is at a pivotal moment in its short history. The publication of the International Sport Coaching Framework by the International Council for Coaching Excellence (ICCE) in 2013 has drawn attention to coaching world-wide and fostered a step change in the way coaching systems are understood and built. Within this evolving context, higher education institutions are increasingly playing a greater role in the education and development of coaches in many countries. One way in which they are doing so is through the delivery of partial or full sport coaching degrees. ICCE recognises this emerging landscape. In this article we present an introduction to the newly developed International Sport Coaching Bachelor Degree Standards. The Standards are the culmination of a 12-month process of cooperation and consultation between an expert group and the coaching community at large. They aim to respond to the needs of higher education institutions and serve as an internationally accepted reference point to aid the development of bachelor coaching degrees that prepare coaches to effectively support athletes and participants.

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Rebecca A. Zakrajsek, E. Earlynn Lauer and Kimberly J. Bodey

Youth sport has traditionally focused on developing athletes physically, technically, and tactically; however, it is important to consider the purposeful development of mental and emotional sport skills for these competitors. Youth athletes experience various stressors within their sport participation that impact their ability to successfully manage the sport environment. Youth sport coaches have a tremendous influence on their athletes and are in a position to help them develop the necessary skills to effectively confront the stress they experience. In addition, the International Sport Coaching Framework identifies six primary functions of coaches to help “fulfil the core purpose of guiding improvement and development” of youth athletes (International Council for Coaching Excellence, 2013, p. 16). This article outlines the developmental stage considerations for working with youth athletes and a tool coaches can use to integrate mental skills development strategies into sport practices. Utilizing the evidence-based steps within this article fosters a holistic and developmentally appropriate approach to performance enhancement and personal development, as both are important objectives for youth sport coaches.

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Phil Ferrar, Lillian Hosea, Miles Henson, Nadine Dubina, Guy Krueger, Jamie Staff and Wade Gilbert

, Siwik, & Gallimore, 2010 ; Jowett, 2007 ). For example, learning how to relate to and connect with others is recognized as a core competency in the International Sport Coaching Framework ( 2013 ) and the recently released USOC Quality Coaching Framework ( 2017 ). However, coach education programs have

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Zenzi Huysmans, Damien Clement, Robert Hilliard and Adam Hansell

in the development of young people at a global scale and specifically within Southern Africa is therefore necessary. In addition, further research is needed to continue refining current coaching frameworks to include the role of youth coaches in holistic athlete development and life skills outcomes