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Kurtis Pankow, Amber D. Mosewich, and Nicholas L. Holt

Leadership styles are “relatively stable patterns of behavior displayed by leaders” ( Eagly, Johannesen-Schmidt, & Van Engen, 2003 , p. 569). Previous coaching research has demonstrated positive associations between various leadership/coaching styles and athlete outcomes. For example, autonomy

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Scott Rathwell and Bradley W. Young

questioned where athletes learned to contribute, finding that teammates, coaches, and members of the athletic department exposed athletes to opportunities to contribute to society. Further, athletes described how other athletes helped them manage their time and supported their contributive efforts. One

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Kurtis Pankow, Amber D. Mosewich, and Nicholas L. Holt

Coach education programs, and the study of coaching development, tend to focus on the acquisition of technical and tactical knowledge ( Erickson, Bruner, MacDonald, & Côté, 2008 ; Lemyre, Trudel, & Durand-Bush, 2007 ) rather than how coaches learn to lead athletes. Leadership requires more than

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Scott Douglas, William R. Falcão, and Gordon A. Bloom

In 1986, the U.S. Olympic Committee on Sport for the Disabled concluded that advancing disability sport would require empirical coaching research specific to this domain, as well as attention to the selection and training programs of these coaches ( Reid & Prupas, 1998 ). More than a decade after

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Moe Machida-Kosuga

Effective leadership of coaches is considered a critical success factor for their athletes’ performance, development, and overall experience within sport. Leadership has been generally defined as “the process whereby an individual influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal

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Laura St. Germain, Amanda M. Rymal, and David J. Hancock

described deliberate play as a critical component of elite performance, whereby athletes learn skills through exploration and creativity. Though elite sport performance is influenced by several other factors (e.g., genetics, psychology, access to coaches, social support, and birth advantages; see Baker

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Julia Allain, Gordon A. Bloom, and Wade D. Gilbert

Inspired by true stories, Hollywood films have recounted some of the most memorable sports moments, which highlighted the role of the coach during the intermissions of competition. For instance, Friday Night Lights shared the story of an American high school football team. In this movie, Coach

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Göran Kenttä, Marte Bentzen, Kristen Dieffenbach, and Peter Olusoga

High-performance (HP) coaching is a demanding profession that challenges mental health and sustainability in the profession ( Didymus, 2017 ). Coaches face constant pressure related to performance expectations, along with the perennial threat of negative consequences such as funding cuts and job

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Paul G. Schempp and Sophie Woorons

Olympians pushing the limits of human performance, medical doctors discovering ways of fighting debilitating diseases, coaches finding fresh solutions to athlete development challenges—experts in every discipline make a difference in people’s daily lives. Experts are those who possess “the

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Cassidy Preston, Veronica Allan, Lauren Wolman, and Jessica Fraser-Thomas

PYD will be achieved ( Danish, Forneris, Hodge, & Heke, 2004 ; Gould & Carson, 2008 ). Rather, broader influences such as the interactions between coaches and parents play an important role in shaping athletes’ PYD outcomes ( Fraser-Thomas & Strachan, 2015 ; Holt et al., 2017 ). Alarmingly