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Chantal N. Vallée and Gordon A. Bloom

Winning a national championship is a rare feat; winning five consecutive championships is extraordinary. One such example has recently occurred with the University of Windsor women’s basketball team which competes in the Canadian interuniversity sports league. The team’s head coach, Chantal Vallée, has a combined regular season and playoff winning percentage greater than 80%, including winning five consecutive Canadian national championships. Even more astounding is that before her appointment the school had only four winning seasons in their 50-year history, and had never hosted a playoff game. The purpose of this paper is to explain the remarkable turnaround of this program. This article will provide both the “what” (Enacting The Vision; Athlete Empowerment; Teaching Life Skills; Lifelong Learning and Personal Reflection) and the “how” (blueprint) of the transformation of the University of Windsor women’s basketball into a perennial national contender.

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Daniel Wixey, Knud Ryom, and Kieran Kingston

case studies, deliberately chosen for their dramatic character and potential to effect change in coach behaviours, are presented to emphasise the psychosocial implications associated with early specialisation. The objective in this study was to engage the soccer academy coaches, critically discussing

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Stewart A. Vella and Dana J. Perlman

The purpose of this paper is to provide a concise resource for coaches, coach educators, and coaching scientists by reviewing three common approaches to coaching: the mastery approach to coaching; autonomy-supportive coaching; and the transformational leadership approach to coaching. The theoretical foundations, purpose, evidence base, specifed behaviours, and translation into coaching and coach education of each approach are reviewed. Despite diverse theoretical foundations and variations in purpose, there is some overlap in the coaching behaviours prescribed by each approach. However, there is limited empirical evidence to support the use of the three approaches in coach education and this is detrimental to effective and evidence-based coach education. Efforts to integrate theoretical foundations are promising, and a comprehensive prescription of coaching behaviours based on an integration of the three approaches is possible. This approach can potentially lead to cumulative effects on positive athlete outcomes. Future research should elucidate the common and unique contributions of these approaches to athletes’ outcomes, and whether they differ by age, sex, type of sport, or competition level.

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INTERNATIONAL SPORT COACHING JOURNAL

DIGEST VOLUME 5, Issue #2

understanding of what it may be like to be a captain. They also suggest coaches should provide support for captains and equip them with the skills required to cope with these stressors effectively. Sportspersonship Coaching Behaviours, Relatedness Need Satisfaction, and Early Adolescent Athletes’ Prosocial and

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INTERNATIONAL SPORT COACHING JOURNAL

DIGEST VOLUME 6, ISSUE #1

through autonomy-supportive coaching behaviours. Authentic Leadership in Sport: Its Relationship With Athletes’ Enjoyment and Commitment and the Mediating Role of Autonomy and Trust Bandura, C.T, & Kavussanu, M. (2018). International Journal of Sports Science & Coaching , 13 (6) 968–977. doi: 10

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International Sport Coaching Journal

DIGEST VOLUME 7, ISSUE #1

on their own team identity and second on opposition team behaviour. It was also possible to identify clear coaching behavioural signs structured as cues and guiding lines for their decision-making process and actions before (e.g. set plays) and during (e.g. management of wrong decisions) competitive

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John Lyle

think in spatial and conceptual pictures) and academic opportunities enabled me to adopt a particular and singular approach to what I perceived, over time, to be deficiencies in understanding coaching behaviour and practice. Origins It is important to appreciate the academic context from which the

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Matthew Andrew, Paul R. Ford, Matthew T. Miller, Allistair P. McRobert, Nathan C. Foster, Guido Seerden, Martin Littlewood, and Spencer J. Hayes

whether coaching behaviour could be supported to implement more “games-based” activities during youth coaching sessions. As illustrated in Figure  1 (top panel), coaches were offered the opportunity to engage in an eight-phase experimental protocol. First, we (lead author, S.J. Hayes) engaged in meetings

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Andrew P. Driska

meaningful excerpts into broad categories using parent codes that related to major topics of inquiry (e.g., coach attitudes, coach behaviours) and child codes that related to more specific topics of inquiry (e.g., use of video, conscientiousness). Table  1 shows both the number of times each child code was

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Adam J. Nichol, Edward T. Hall, Will Vickery, and Philip R. Hayes

, 2004a ; Kahan, 1999 ; Vella, Oades, & Crowe, 2010 ). However, most reviews focus on specific elements of coach behaviour or research methods in isolation, leaving our understanding of the relationship between coaching practice and athlete outcomes fragmented and unclear. Indeed, in their overview of