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Erin E. Dierickx, Samantha E. Scarneo-Miller, and Douglas J. Casa

programs implement their EAPs would help. Educational sessions in the state informing coaches on EAPs and providing templates for EAPs are possible interventions to improve coaches’ understanding. Limitations and Future Research This is the first study to evaluate coachesknowledge and perceptions of EAP

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Jean Côté, John Saimela, Pierre Trudel, Abderrahim Baria, and Storm Russell

An expert system approach (Buchanan et al., 1983) was used to identify and conceptualize the knowledge of 17 Canadian expert high-performance gymnastic coaches. The knowledge elicitation process consisted of open-ended questions and various questioning methods to unveil, explore, and prove important information (Patton, 1987; Spradley, 1979) about coaching. All coaches’ interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the unstructured qualitative data were inductively analyzed following the procedures and techniques of grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1990). The inductive analysis process allowed the meaning units of the interview transcripts to be regrouped into properties, categories, and components. The components emerging from the analysis consisted of (a) competition, (b) training, (c) organization, (d) coach’s personal characteristics, (e) gymnast’s personal characteristics and level of development, and (f) contextual factors. These components were further developed into a model representing coaches’ knowledge.

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Sean H. Kerr, Tiffanye M. Vargas, Mimi Nakajima, and Jim Becker

, & McLaughlin, 2010 ). However, training over the Internet can be ambiguous and often individuals can bypass various sections due to poor regulation standards. To date, research on coachesknowledge and attitudes towards concussions has primarily focused on the collegiate and high school coach. Such research

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Cheryl Govero and Barbara A. Bushman

Athletes are at a high risk for eating disorders due to the pressures placed on them by themselves as well as coaches. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the knowledge level of eating disorders among cross country coaches, (2) to determine their level of confidence in this knowledge, and (3) to determine reported sources of educational resources. Four schools were randomly selected from each NCAA Division I conference (return rate: 48%). A two-part questionnaire assessed sources of information and knowledge of eating disorders. Literature and sponsored programs were the two most common sources of information. For the 30 knowledge questions, coaches indicated their confidence level on a 4-item Likert-type scale. The knowledge of the majority of coaches was relatively high, and those with higher accuracy also had higher confidence. The confidence level and the percent of coaches answering each question correctly were significantly correlated, r=0.56 (p<0.01) but the confidence level and the percent answering incorrectly were not significantly correlated, r=0.24 (p=0.24). There were no significant differences in knowledge scores considering years of coaching (p=0.67) nor were there any significant differences in the scores between males and females (p=0.17). Although the cross country coaches were quite knowledgeable, additional ways to increase knowledge of eating disorders are needed.

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Chantal N. Vallée and Gordon A. Bloom

Winning a national championship is a rare feat; winning five consecutive championships is extraordinary. One such example has recently occurred with the University of Windsor women’s basketball team which competes in the Canadian interuniversity sports league. The team’s head coach, Chantal Vallée, has a combined regular season and playoff winning percentage greater than 80%, including winning five consecutive Canadian national championships. Even more astounding is that before her appointment the school had only four winning seasons in their 50-year history, and had never hosted a playoff game. The purpose of this paper is to explain the remarkable turnaround of this program. This article will provide both the “what” (Enacting The Vision; Athlete Empowerment; Teaching Life Skills; Lifelong Learning and Personal Reflection) and the “how” (blueprint) of the transformation of the University of Windsor women’s basketball into a perennial national contender.

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Bradford Strand, Shannon David, Katie J. Lyman, and Jay M. Albrecht

The purpose of this original research was to survey high school coaches in four states in the Midwest region of the United States regarding their knowledge of first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) as well as confidence in managing/treating emergency situations. Responses to general knowledge inquiries revealed that coaches were able to accurately answer questions related to return to play, level of consciousness, external bleeding, and cardiac arrest. However, coaches were unable to correctly answer questions specific to rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) and also misidentified information related to pediatric AED use. Because sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of death and has been linked to lack of bystander intervention, the results of this project should be considered by coaches and administrators to implement certification and continuing education for high school coaches. Finally, coaches who were certified in first aid, CPR, and AED were more confident in treating an individual who required care compared with coaches not certified. Therefore, individuals who coach at all levels of sport and recreational activities should consider formal training and certification.

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Rachel A. Van Woezik, Colin D. McLaren, Jean Côté, Karl Erickson, Barbi Law, Denyse Lafrance Horning, Bettina Callary, and Mark W. Bruner

learning situation as key, others may value other forms ( Werthner & Trudel, 2006 ). Below, we unpack the literature on coaching knowledge acquisition and highlight how coach learning has been explored. Werthner and Trudel ( 2009 ) suggested that a coach’s cognitive structure will change (i.e., they will

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Marte Bentzen, Danielle Alexander, Gordon A. Bloom, and Göran Kenttä

). To further discuss the roles and responsibilities of the coach, this definition can be broken down into the following three sections: coaching knowledge, athlete outcomes, and coaching context. Coaching knowledge refers to professional, interpersonal, and intrapersonal knowledge. First, coaches are

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Jim Denison

course, “CoachingKnowledges’: Understanding The Social Dimensions of Performance Sport.” Up to this point in the term they have been reading articles, chapters, and blog posts that discuss various approaches to planning. Some are written by sport scientists and coaches using concepts familiar to them

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Israel Halperin

, some gaps remain—primarily, the fact that many sport and strength and conditioning coaches remain reluctant to work alongside exercise scientists and to implement results from scientific studies. 2 , 3 Coaches regularly rely on peer discussion to further their coaching knowledge base and consume