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Seung Pil Lee, T. Bettina Cornwell, and Kathy Babiak

The objective of this study is to develop an instrument to measure the social impact of sport. While there is a rich literature suggesting and measuring the ways in which sport contributes to society, no broad, encompassing scale has been developed. A measure of this type is useful if sport initiatives are to gain social, political and financial support, especially in the form of corporate sponsorship. The proposed “Social Impact of Sport Scale” includes the dimensions of social capital, collective identities, health literacy, well-being and human capital. In addition to development of a detailed 75 item composite scale stemming largely from past measurement, a shorter set of global measures is also examined. A convenience sample of university students is used in scale development as well as a partial test of the scale in context. Results find support for the detailed scale and for the short global measure instrument. In addition, the partial test of the scale in a context of sport experience relevant to students is reported. The value of the scale in use and areas of future research are discussed.

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Blair W. Browning and Jeffrey W. Kassing

Interim coaches have become commonplace in college athletics. With much at stake, they must act as leaders despite the constraints that accompany interim status. This case study provides an initial examination of interim leadership in the domain of college athletics by focusing on a specific high-profile interim coach’s initial press conference. The authors specifically consider the content of The Ohio State University football coach Luke Fickell’s first press conference after being named interim head coach. Their analysis reveals that Fickell strategically managed the interim label and the temporal nature of the interim role, balanced service goals and career-aspirant ones, and performed collective identity through a variety of means. The implications of these practices for interim coaches in college athletics are discussed.

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Cynthia Fabrizio Pelak

This study examines shifting race relations within one of South Africa’s most popular and fastest growing sports—women’s netball. Drawing on political opportunity and collective identity theories as articulated by social movement scholars, this article develops an analytical strategy to elucidate how athletes and sport administrators can serve as agents of social change. This analysis relies on interview, survey, and archival data collected during 1999 and 2000. The findings show that netball athletes and administrators are contributing to nation building in post-apartheid South Africa by constructing new collective identities across historical racial boundaries.

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-Logoed Merchandise Taesoo Ahn 1 Young Ik Suh 1 Jin Kyun Lee 1 Paul M. Pedersen 1 1 2013 27 1 11 23 10.1123/jsm.27.1.11 Developing an Instrument to Measure the Social Impact of Sport: Social Capital, Collective Identities, Health Literacy, Well-Being and Human Capital Seung Pil Lee 1 T. Bettina Cornwell 1

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Jens De Rycke, Veerle De Bosscher, Hiroaki Funahashi, and Popi Sotiriadou

. social equality and inclusion, 2. collective identity and pride, 3. ethics and fair play, 4. feel good and passion, 5. fans and (media) attraction, 6. international prestige and image, 7. athletes’ ability and quality of life, 8. sport participation and life skills, 9. sponsors and commercial activity

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Christine E. Wegner, Bradley J. Baker, and Gareth J. Jones

. Social Identity Among Volunteers in CSOs Since volunteers do not receive financial compensation for their service, previous researchers, particularly within sport, have highlighted the importance of fostering a strong collective identity that connects individuals to a particular organization

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Christine E. Wegner, Bradley J. Baker, and Gareth J. Jones

. Social Identity Among Volunteers in CSOs Since volunteers do not receive financial compensation for their service, previous researchers, particularly within sport, have highlighted the importance of fostering a strong collective identity that connects individuals to a particular organization

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Murray G. Phillips and Gary Osmond

European sport created competitions at local, regional, national, and international levels, providing access to financial rewards, status, and cultural acceptance. Sport was important to both individual and collective identity formation but intersected in complex ways with class, gender, race, sexuality

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Matthew Lamont and Sheranne Fairley

engendered a sense of communitas. Further, Green and Chalip argued that event organizers should better recognize the desires of participants to celebrate their collective identities in designing event precincts and programs. Thus, while research on social world coalescence at events has examined the values

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Catalina Belalcazar and Bettina Callary

environment that promotes and supports the development of members, positive community empowerment, collective identities, social networks, well-being, health, and lifelong learning ( Lawson, 2005 ). Although there are no formalized coaching positions in the league, certain players have stepped up to promote