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Nicole M.S. Belanger and Julie Hicks Patrick

The benefits associated with engaging in physical activity are well known, ranging from an increased sense of well being to a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. 1 Despite these advantages, roughly 36%–53% of college students do not engage in adequate physical

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Jennifer P. Agans, Oliver W.A. Wilson and Melissa Bopp

Inactivity and obesity among students at American colleges and universities are serious concerns both for public health in general and for administrators seeking to enhance the quality of life of their students and alumni. Up to 50% of college students are physically inactive, 1 , 2 and this trend

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Julie DiMatteo, Cynthia Radnitz, Katharine L. Loeb and Jingwen Ni

). However, substantial numbers of college students do not participate in moderate (25%) or vigorous (40.6%) physical activity or incorporate strength training (55.7%; American College Health Association [ACHA], 2012a ). Thus, to address weight gain, universities have begun to implement interventions

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Jessica L. David, Matthew D. Powless, Jacqueline E. Hyman, DeJon M. Purnell, Jesse A. Steinfeldt and Shelbi Fisher

a , 2016b ). With the vast majority of users falling in the age range of 18–29 ( Greenwood, Perrin, & Duggan, 2016 ), Twitter has become a predominant form of communication among young adults and college student populations ( Sanderson, 2011 ). One particular domain where Twitter reigns supreme is

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C. Keith Harrison, Suzanne Malia Lawrence and Scott J. Bukstein

While the sport sociology community has had a long-running conversation about the relationship between athletes’ success and race, there are few empirical investigations of individuals’ attitudes regarding the connection of race and athletic performance. This study on White college students’ explanations of White (and African American) athleticism attempts to push this discussion of race and sport. Using a qualitative, open-ended question we elicited explanations from White college students about athletic performance. Findings revealed that White students explained White athleticism through discussions of African American athleticism. In addition, White student participants avoided biological explanations regarding White athletes’ success.

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Vanessa J. Harbour, Timothy K. Behrens, Han S. Kim and Connie L. Kitchens

Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine whether college students meeting the vigorous physical activity (VPA) recommendation reported less frequent symptoms of depression than those not meeting the recommendation.

Methods:

A secondary analysis of the Utah Higher Education Health Behavior Survey was conducted. Descriptive statistics and unconditional logistic regressions were calculated.

Results:

The final sample included 8621 participants (age = 21.34 ± 2.6 years). There was a difference in the frequency of depressive symptoms and VPA. Those not meeting the VPA recommendation reported having more frequent depressive symptoms than those meeting the VPA recommendation. Results were consistent by gender.

Conclusion:

In this sample, our data suggest VPA may be associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms. These findings might be indicative of a dose–response relationship between VPA and symptoms of depression in college students.

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Mary Ann Devine

College years are an experimental phase in young adulthood and can lay the foundation for lifelong behaviors. One type of behavior developed during these years is the use of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). LTPA experiences of typical college students have been examined, but there is a lack of studies examining the experiences of students with disabilities. The purpose of this inquiry is to understand the experiences of college students with disabilities and their LTPA, with focus on factors that facilitate or create barriers to engagement. Grounded theory was used to understand LTPA with undergraduates with mobility or visual impairments. Results indicated a theme of culture of physical activity and disability as they received a message that engagement in LTPA was “unnecessary” or “heroic,” which altered their LTPA experiences. Barriers to LTPA can be understood through a social relational lens to recognize the multidimensionality of barriers and facilitators to LTPA.

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Robert C. Hilliard, Lorenzo A. Redmond and Jack C. Watson II

College student-athletes are a population that appear to experience mental illness at rates comparable or higher to their nonathlete peers (e.g.,  Jolly, 2008 ; Moreland, Coxe, & Yang, 2018 ). Highly regimented schedules, time demands, and pressures to be successful academically and athletically

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Sun J. Kang, Jae-Pil Ha and Marion E. Hambrick

The popularity of smartphones has led to the creation of sport-related mobile applications in the areas of games, fitness, information, and events for sport consumers. The main purpose of this study was to examine why college students use sport-related mobile applications and what benefits they received from their usage. The study employed the Motivation Scale for Sport Online Consumption and the Technology Acceptance Model to understand this usage in more detail. Using a mixed-method approach, the study revealed that college students identified fanship, convenience, and information as primary motives for using their sport-related mobile applications. For college students who are sport fans, supporting their fanship through these applications represents an important aspect of their lifestyle. Sport managers and sport application developers will benefit from understanding users’ intentions and motives as the market for sport-related applications continues to grow.

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Kerem Shuval, Eyal Weissblueth, Mayer Brezis, Adan Araida and Loretta DiPietro

Background:

Ample research has assessed correlates of physical activity (PA) among college students; however, socioenvironmental correlates of PA have not been assessed in Arab and Jewish Israeli college students.

Methods:

Cross-sectional study of 198 Arab and Jewish physical education college students. The dependent variable was meeting the CDC/ACSM guidelines for moderate/vigorous PA. Independent variables consisted of individual variables (eg, ethnicity, gender, religious observance) and socioenvironmental variables (eg, street lighting, family support, exercise facilities). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used.

Results:

Thirty-three percent of the students met the recommended guidelines for PA. Individual variables were more highly correlated with PA than socioenvironmental variables. In the final logistic-regression model 3 individual covariates independently predicted PA: gender, race/ethnicity, and self-efficacy. Access to open space was the only environmental variable significantly correlated with PA.

Conclusions:

The results underscore the need to implement an intervention program aimed at promoting the recommended levels of PA among Arab and Jewish Israeli physical education college students, while tailoring the intervention to individual risk markers for physical inactivity (eg, race/ethnicity, gender).