Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 164 items for :

  • "community sport" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Alison Doherty and Graham Cuskelly

There is growing theoretical and empirical interest in nonprofit voluntary community sport organizations (CSOs) or clubs as a critical part of the sporting landscape ( Doherty & Cousens, 2013 ; Jeanes et al., 2018 ; Macrae, 2017 ; Swierzy, Wicker, & Breuer, 2018 ). These membership organizations

Restricted access

Jennifer E. McGarry, Justin M. Evanovich, Nneka A. Arinze, Kolin Ebron, and Jun Young Cho

neighboring town, who was interested in partnering with West Jefferson and the Harris Center on a project for a class on community sport. To Ms. Jackson, a class on community sport, with a professor who had previous experience in non-profit sport, sounded like it had potential. Ms. Jackson was hopeful. The

Restricted access

Philippe Crisp

Community sport coaches in the United Kingdom, through using sport projects, play an important role in delivering wider social policy objectives. These objectives relate to how the use of sport is seen to be effective in managing changes in individuals through positive youth development (PYD) and

Restricted access

Velina B. Brackebusch

rely on government funding and nonprofit clubs for an opportunity to play and exercise. Managing and Developing Community Sport is a timely book, as it addresses the link between community sport and the business sector by reviewing how physical activity, sport development, health promotions, coaching

Restricted access

Katie E. Misener

youth sport context can facilitate well-being for parents via a meaningful and healthy lifestyle rather than one that enables negative behavior and a loss of a parent’s own leisure. This topic is highly relevant to the community sport sector, and to me as a parent of two young children who participate

Restricted access

Patti Millar and Alison Doherty

Organizational capacity is the assets and resources an organization draws on to achieve its goals ( Hall et al., 2003 ). It has been the focus of increasing attention in the nonprofit sector and community sport context in particular, as scholars endeavor to understand the critical dimensions of

Restricted access

Pamela Wicker, Kevin Filo, and Graham Cuskelly

When community sport clubs are impacted by natural disasters, organizational resilience is critical to recovery. Within this study, organizational resilience is conceptualized as a function of robustness, redundancy, resourcefulness, and rapidity, and applied to community sport clubs. Using data from a survey of sport clubs (n = 200) in Queensland, Australia, the organizational resilience of affected clubs and their recovery from natural disasters (flooding, cyclone) was investigated. The findings show that clubs used human and financial resources predominantly in their recovery efforts. Organizational resilience, number of members, and the use of government grants had a significant positive effect on the extent of the club’s perceived overall recovery. Clubs providing equestrian, golf, and motor sports recovered to a significantly lower extent. Proactively pursuing government grants, suitable insurance coverage, and interorganizational relationships were identified as factors that assisted clubs in becoming more resilient. The measurement of resilience should be refined and expanded in future research.

Restricted access

Katie Misener and Alison Doherty

As a pivotal part of the nonprofit and voluntary sector, community sport organizations provide opportunities for active participation, social engagement, and community cohesion. This study examined the nature and impact of organizational capacity in one nonprofit community sport club to identify factors that affect the ability of this organization to fulfill its mandate and provide sport opportunities in the community. Hall et al.’s (2003) multidimensional framework of human resources, financial, relationships/ networks, infrastructure and process, and planning and development capacity was used. The study incorporated interviews with board members and coaches as well as active-member researcher observations (Adler & Adler, 1987). Key strengths and challenges of each capacity dimension were uncovered, and connections among the dimensions were revealed. The relatively greater importance of human resources and planning and development capacity for goal achievement was identified. The findings support the use of a multidimensional approach for generating a comprehensive understanding of organizational capacity in community sport, and for identifying where and how capacity may be enhanced.

Restricted access

Sara K. Marshall and Paul Barry

Development practitioners and agencies consider sport to play a valuable role in social development; however, the emerging evidence does not yet adequately describe sport’s contribution to social development. Lyras (2009, 2012a) proposed a sport for development theory (SFDT) as a specific model to increase understanding of the processes and conditions involved in sport for development (SFD) programs. In our study, SFD practitioners of the Kicking AIDS Out Network were interviewed to identify project elements perceived as significant for achieving development objectives, and their perceptions were examined in relation to SFDT to test its applicability to their particular development context. The findings suggest SFDT offers an appropriate framework to enhance project design and delivery that integrates the features of sport, education, life skills development, use of leaders as change agents, and participation that are key to Kicking AIDS Out programs and other community sport programs promoting behavior and social change.

Restricted access

Dawn Anderson-Butcher, Allison Riley, Anthony Amorose, Aidyn Iachini, and Rebecca Wade-Mdivanian

Maximizing youth experiences in community sport programs is critical, particularly for vulnerable and/or marginalized youth who may have limited access and opportunity to these experiences. Using second-order latent growth modeling, this study explores the impact of a community sport program, the LiFE Sports Camp, on the development of social and sport skills among vulnerable youth. The importance of a sense of belonging as a key mechanism that contributes to youth outcomes also is examined. The findings of this research point to the value of community sport that is strategically designed to promote both sport and social outcomes in youth, as well as highlights the role of belonging in these contexts. Implications for sports management leaders and practitioners are discussed.