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Ashley N. Weingartz and Stacy Warner

. The national attention provided through this exposure offered a springboard for GLL to promote their league and promote fundraising efforts across social media during the team’s tournament run. Unfortunately, like so many community sport organizations, GLL was understaffed and lacked the technical

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Jane Chung, George Demiris and Hilaire J. Thompson

Mobility is critical in maintaining independence in older adults. This study aims to systematically review the scientific literature to identify measures of mobility limitation for community-dwelling older adults. A systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, and psycINFO, using the search terms “mobility limitation”, “mobility disability”, and “mobility difficulty” yielded 1,847 articles from 1990 to 2012; a final selection of 103 articles was used for the present manuscript. Tools to measure mobility were found to be either self-report or performance-based instruments. Commonly measured constructs of mobility included walking, climbing stairs, and lower extremity function. There was heterogeneity in ways of defining and measuring mobility limitation in older adults living in the community. Given the lack of consistency in assessment tools for mobility, a clear understanding and standardization of instruments are required for comparison across studies and for better understanding indicators and outcomes of mobility limitation in community-dwelling older adults.

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Akio Kubota, Alison Carver and Takemi Sugiyama

activity among older adults in Germany ( Herbolsheimer, Mosler, & Peter, 2016 ). Another social aspect that may be relevant to older adults’ physical activity is social engagement. Social engagement may include taking part in events, meetings, and activities within a local community. It can be argued that

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Stefan Walzel, Jonathan Robertson and Christos Anagnostopoulos

various legal and ethical stakeholders in the wake of scandals, the very social nature of sports organizations ordains social initiatives and outreach programs ( Anagnostopoulos & Kolyperas, 2016 ). Moreover, sports have a strong socially responsible, community-embedded nature that has grown in importance

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Bastian Popp, Chris Horbel and Claas Christian Germelmann

negative communication, such as antibrand communities, which are formed around common aversions toward a specific brand ( Hollenbeck & Zinkhan, 2006 ). Hence, the online environment is considered a powerful booster of current social trends ( Krishnamurthy & Kucuk, 2009 ). In recent years, a few sport

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Michael Kirkwood, Sheau-Fen Yap and Yingzi Xu

In the sporting arena, the consumption of sport is increasingly moving to the online realm. Online social networks have facilitated extensive interactions and collaborative consumption activities among like-minded fans, leading to the creation of online sport-fan communities ( Hedlund, 2014 ). In

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Steven Loy

3 WINS Fitness is a student-delivered free exercise program for the community delivered in public parks. We believe this program, which operates without external funding and has been sustained for 6 years, is one significant solution to reducing the level of physical inactivity in the United States. The operative 3 WINS in our program are participant health, community health, and student professional development. The primary focus has been underserved communities, and our current eight programs in Los Angeles, serve over 300 participants regularly. Three challenges to the program are student empowerment, faculty understanding and involvement, and establishing the relationship between university and parks, which represent a vital partnership. However, the accomplishment of undergraduate students having such a dynamic impact on public health underscores the need for encouraging this sustainable and innovative strategy to increase the physical activity levels of communities across America.

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Rebecca T. Marsh Naturkach and Donna L. Goodwin

Community service learning (CSL) is a pedagogical tool used to enhance academic learning and promote civic engagement by combining classroom theory with applied community practice ( Jacoby, 1996 ; Richards, Eberline, Padaruth, & Templin, 2015 ; Roper & Santiago, 2014 ). The general benefits of

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Dani M. Moffit, Jamie L. Mansell and Anne C. Russ

Temple University Owls Athletic Training Society (OATS), committed to education and community involvement, formed a relationship with Lanning Square Elementary School (LSE). Located less than 10 miles from campus in Camden, NJ, a high incidence of poverty, violence, and one-parent families is the norm. Through a grant, OATS adopted the fifth-grade classes at LSE for 1 year, beginning with letter exchanges between OATS students and elementary students. OATS traveled to LSE for their holiday party, met their pen pals, and provided healthy snacks. In the spring, the LSE completed a health/wellness unit and visited Temple. Students shared several health activities including learning about bones/muscles in the anatomy laboratory, stretching properly, and exercising. They received lunch and Temple mementos. OATS raised money the following year to continue the project. This allowed OATS and administrators to participate positively in our community, promote diversity, and introduce healthy lifestyles to youngsters.

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Michael W. Beets, Robert G. Weaver, Aaron Beighle, Collin Webster and Russell R. Pate

Background:

Summer day camps (SDC) represent one of the largest settings, outside the academic school year, where children can engage in safe, enjoyable physical activity (PA). Yet, little is known about this setting and how active children are while attending.

Methods:

System for Observing Play and Leisure Activity in Youth was used to categorize PA of boys/girls as Sedentary/Walking/Vigorous across multiple days (8 AM to 6 PM) in 4 large-scale community-based SDCs. Contextual characteristics of type of activity, activity management, equipment, and in/outdoors were collected simultaneously. Mixed-model regression analyses examined associations between PA categories and contextual characteristics.

Results:

A total of 4649 scans of 2462 children were made across 27 days in the SDCs. Physical activity opportunities represented 38% of the daily schedule. Overall, 74%–79%, 13%–16%, and 7%–9% of children were observed Sedentary, Walking, or Vigorous during the SDC, and this changed to 62%–67%, 18%–19%, and 15%–18% observed Sedentary, Walking, or Vigorous during PA opportunities. Water-based PA, equipment, and free-play were related to increased PA. Children waiting-in-line for turns, staff instructing, and organized PA were related to increased sedentary.

Conclusions:

These findings provide evidence of modifiable characteristics of SDCs associated with PA. Improving staff skills related to facilitating active environments is a viable avenue to increase PA accumulated within SDCs.