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Establishing Partnerships for Effective Academic Programs

Joanna L. Morrissey, Joseph A. Beckett, Ross Sherman, and Lisa J. Leininger

As undergraduate students prepare to enter the workforce and become engaged members in their communities, it is necessary for universities to provide students with opportunities and resources to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to be successful in their professional, personal, and social pursuits. Experiential learning is one approach that may be used to facilitate and strengthen the learning process for undergraduate students. Grounded in experiential learning, Kinesiology-specific service learning and internship programs can help students develop the skillset needed to be successful in their major and future careers. To best facilitate students’ learning, it is imperative that such academic programs build collaborative, sustainable and genuine campus-community partnerships. This paper presents a series of practical and successful partnership-building strategies from three unique institutions.

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An Online Program for High School Student-Athlete Leadership Development: Community Engagement, Collaboration, and Course Creation

Scott Pierce, Jedediah Blanton, and Daniel Gould

). Consequently, there is a call to create educational initiatives that directly and explicitly target the development of leadership skills for adolescent student-athletes. This case study describes how SPPs engaged with community partners to develop and launch educational leadership programming for youth

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From Start-Up to Scale-Up of a Health-Promoting Intervention for Older Adults: The Choose to Move Story

Lindsay Nettlefold, Samantha M. Gray, Joanie Sims-Gould, and Heather A. McKay

approach to scale-up; and (c) share key lessons learned while implementing and scaling up health-promoting interventions with community partners across more than 2 decades. Choose to Move Motivation and Guiding Principles We previously described, in detail, the driving forces behind our intervention

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Project L.E.E.P. (Leadership through Education, Experience and Photovoice): An Embedded Graduate Service-Learning Initiative

James E. Johnson

learning are varied, but central to their core is a mutually beneficial relationship between learner (student) and organization (community partner). This project utilized Kolb’s experiential learning model ( Kolb, 1984 ), which is one of the more widely accepted models of experiential learning. Kolb based

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Internships in Kinesiology: Reconsidering Best Practices

Mark Urtel, Sara F. Michaliszyn, and Craig Stiemsma

may stop asking for interns and try to find another institution or way to address their needs rather than partnering with us. In effect, the program might be unintentionally removing a valued community partner from an inventory of approved sites if the program is unable to send interns to those sites

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Community Engagement Through Sport: University Partnerships to Promote Youth Development

Michael A. Hemphill and Tom Martinek

Many kinesiology departments engage in partnerships that aim to promote positive youth development through physical activity. These partnerships are often enhanced by mutually beneficial goals and shared decision making between university and community partners. This paper describes how sport has been at the center of two university-community partnerships that have helped to teach life skills to youth. We draw upon our experience working with community partners to illuminate challenges and opportunities for youth-focused partnerships. The programs include an emphasis on sustainability. As kinesiology programs continue to enhance their efforts to partner and support youth development, case studies such as this may help inform our efforts.

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Interdisciplinary Research Centers: A Pathway for Solving Complex Problems

JoEllen M. Sefton and Kenneth A. Games

Colleges and universities increasingly face pressure to take the lead in solving complex problems. Developing and sustaining interdisciplinary research centers that collaborate with community partners can be an effective method of approaching complex challenges. We use the example of interdisciplinary research centers designed to specifically work with tactical athlete organizations (e.g., military, police, fire) as one example of how research centers can be developed and produce important outcomes. A 10-step process is outlined for finding partners, executing projects, and growing research centers which are mutually beneficial to the partner organization and the academic institution. With vision, commitment, and persistence, interdisciplinary research centers can solve complex problems and have meaningful impacts in the community.

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Utilization of Collaborations to Engage Children in Physical Activity: A Community-Based Research Approach

Sheri J. Brock, Danielle Wadsworth, Shelby Foote, and Mary E. Rudisill

Institutions of higher education have a responsibility to prioritize the needs of society and local communities. One essential need prevalent in all communities is to address the rise of obesity and health risks due to lack of participation in physical activity. In the United States, children spend a small percentage of time engaged in physical activity, and engagement decreases further in adolescence and adulthood. Collaborative partnerships between kinesiology faculty at universities and community organizations are one avenue for engaging children in physical activity. Partnerships must be multilevel and community wide to evoke change and have long-term impact and sustainability. Within the context of community-based research, we propose a three-step framework for establishing collaborative partnerships: (1) determining the needs of partners; (2) discussing expertise, services, and philosophy; and (3) providing a quality product. In addition, we outline and illustrate our experiences when collaborating with community partners to promote physical activity.

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Built Environment Associations With Health Behaviors Among Hispanics

Robert Fields, Andrew T. Kaczynski, Melissa Bopp, and Elizabeth Fallon

Background:

Few studies of the built environment and physical activity or other health behaviors have examined minority populations specifically. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between the built environment and multiple health behaviors and outcomes among Hispanic adults.

Methods:

Community partners distributed surveys (n = 189) in 3 communities in southwest Kansas. Logistic regression was used to examine relationships between neighborhood perceptions and 4 outcomes.

Results:

Meeting physical activity recommendations was associated with the presence of sidewalks and a safe park, and inversely related to higher crime. Residential density and shops nearby were related to active commuting. Sedentary behavior was inversely related to having a bus stop, bike facilities, safe park, interesting things to look at, and seeing people active. Finally, seeing people active was positively associated with being overweight.

Conclusions:

This study suggests that among Hispanics, many built environment variables are related to health behaviors and should be targets for future neighborhood change efforts and research.

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Putting “Participatory” into Participatory Forms of Action Research

Wendy Frisby, Colleen J. Reid, Sydney Millar, and Larena Hoeber

Although there has been a rise in calls for participatory forms of research, there is little literature on the challenges of involving research participants in all phases of the research process. Actively involving research participants requires new strategies, new researcher and research-participant roles, and consideration of a number of ethical dilemmas. We analyzed the strategies employed and challenges encountered based on our experiences conducting feminist participatory action research with a marginalized population and a variety of community partners over 3 years. Five phases of the research process were considered including developing the research questions, building trust, collecting data, analyzing data, and communicating the results for action. Our goals were to demonstrate the relevance of a participatory approach to sport management research, while at the same time acknowledging some of the realities of engaging in this type of research.