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David I. Anderson

’t know—to draw attention to another gap in our understanding of human physical activity. That body of knowledge and skill set is connected to what I have labeled “complementary and alternative approaches to movement education” (CAAME), for want of a better label. Though unwieldy, particularly because it

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Angelo Sabag, Ric Lovell, Neil P. Walsh, Nick Grantham, Mathieu Lacome, and Martin Buchheit

single study, which had limited ecological validity in the context of soccer. Given the paucity of data, it is unknown whether UB RT on the day after match play (MD+1) is compatible, complementary, or contraindicated for temporal recovery kinetics in elite soccer players. Consequently, the aim of this

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Ryan Eckert, Jennifer Huberty, Heidi Kosiorek, Shannon Clark-Sienkiewicz, Linda Larkey, and Ruben Mesa

.J. , Sohl , S.J. , Jesse , M.T. , Zahavich , A.N.R. , & Danhauer , S.C. ( 2012 ). Yoga & cancer interventions: A review of the clinical significance of patient reported outcomes for cancer survivors . Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2012, 642576 . doi:10

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William R. Whitehill

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Joachim Kimmerle, Kim-Kristin Gerbing, Ansgar Thiel, and Ulrike Cress

This research note provides an explorative analysis of sport-related knowledge exchange about Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on the Internet. Data are taken from a qualitative content analysis of the largest German-speaking Internet sport portal. Knowledge exchange about CAM in these Internet fora is characterized by the following phenomena: Users expected CAM to improve their performance and discussed a great variety of treatments based on primarily anecdotal knowledge. In addition, two main types of users (helpers and help-seekers) dominated the exchanges. The main reasons for seeking alternative medical help on the Internet were cases of prolonged illness and dissatisfaction with biomedical care.

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Robynne M. Gravenhorst and Charles B. Walter

Apraxia is a complex movement disorder that frequently occurs following left hemisphere stroke. Studies on patients with apraxia constitute an especially interesting body of literature for motor control researchers who seek to understand the cognitive mechanisms involved in the voluntary control of movement. Reciprocally, among apraxia researchers, great interest exists concerning the ways in which methods and theory from the field of motor control can be brought to bear in the clinical and empirical evaluation of this disorder. Here we will review representative evidence on the etiology, frequency, and assessment of apraxia, and suggest how research methods and theories from the field of motor control can be applied to, and also benefit from, a deeper understanding of apraxia. Parallels are proposed between the major cognitive models of apraxia and motor control to facilitate translation of terminology and concepts, and to enrich the emerging dialogue between these two complementary research domains.

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Column-editor : Robert D. Kersey

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Philip Maffetone

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Catherine Quatman and Packianathan Chelladurai

As an emerging research approach, social network theory and analysis has been embraced and effectively applied in disciplines that have overlapping interests with sport management researchers including such fields as organizational behavior and sport sociology. Although a number of sport management scholars have investigated network-related concepts, to date no sport management studies have fully utilized the analytical tools that social network theory and analysis have to offer. In conjunction with a discussion about the ontological, epistemological, and methodological perspectives associated with network analysis, this article uses several examples from the sport management and organizational behavior bodies of literature to illustrate a number of the advantageous techniques and insights social network theory and analysis can offer. These examples are meant to provide a general understanding of the utility and applicability of the social network theory and analysis and potentially inspire sport management researchers to adopt a social network lens in their future research endeavors.