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Nicolas Berryman, Iñigo Mujika and Laurent Bosquet

adaptations. Side 1: The Effects of Concurrent Training on Neuromuscular Performance Chronic Effects While pursuing his postdoctoral studies, Robert C. Hickson gradually included some running sessions to his habitual strength-training program. This anecdote later led to a research project, which became a

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Mariana R. Silva, Cristine L. Alberton, Caroline O. Braga and Stephanie S. Pinto

ones found in the literature, which also determined the postexercise EE after water-based training sessions. Currently, a practice that is becoming very common is the performance of aerobic and resistance exercises during the same training session, called as concurrent training (CT). The CT has an

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Michael J. Ormsbee, Brandon D. Willingham, Tasha Marchant, Teresa L. Binkley, Bonny L. Specker and Matthew D. Vukovich

 al., 1988 ). Unfortunately, there are limited studies that have investigated the impact of higher protein intakes on adaptations to prolonged endurance training ( Ferguson-Stegall et al., 2011 ). Many individuals involved in habitual exercise combine strength and endurance training (concurrent training

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Ehsan Ghahramanloo, Adrian W. Midgley and David J. Bentley

Background:

There is little information regarding the effects of concurrent training (endurance and resistance training performed in the same overall regimen) on blood lipid profile in sedentary male subjects. This study compared the effects of 3 different 8-wk training programs [endurance training (ET), strength training (ST) and concurrent training (CT)] on blood lipid profile and body composition in untrained young men.

Methods:

A total of 27 subjects were randomly allocated to an ET, ST or CT group which performed either progressive treadmill (ET), free weight (ST) or both the endurance and strength training requirements for 8 weeks.

Results:

High-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein profiles significantly improved in the ET and CT groups (P < .01) but not in the ST group. Triglyceride and total cholesterol profiles significantly improved in all 3 training groups. Total fat mass significantly decreased in the ET and CT groups (P < .001) but not in the ST group, whereas fat free mass significantly increased in the ST and CT groups (P < .01) but not in the ET group.

Conclusions:

These results indicate that CT can be used to simultaneously improve both the serum lipid profile and body composition of previously untrained, apparently health young men.

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Julien Robineau, Mathieu Lacome, Julien Piscione, Xavier Bigard and Nicolas Babault

Purpose:

To assess the impact of 2 high-intensity interval-training (HIT) programs (short interval vs sprint interval training) on muscle strength and aerobic performances in a concurrent training program in amateur rugby sevens players.

Methods:

Thirty-six amateur rugby sevens players were randomly assigned to strength and short interval training (INT), strength and sprint interval training (SIT), or a strength-only training group (CON) during an 8-wk period. Maximal strength and power tests, aerobic measurements (peak oxygen uptake [VO2peak] and maximal aerobic velocity), and a specific repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test were conducted before and immediately after the overall training period.

Results:

From magnitude-based inference and effect size (ES ± 90% confidence limit) analyses, the current study revealed substantial gains in maximal strength and jump-height performance in all groups. The difference in change of slow concentric torque production was greater in CON than in SIT (0.65 ± 0.72, moderate). VO2peak and, consequently, mean performance in the RSA test were improved in the SIT group only (0.64 ± 0.29, moderate; –0.54 ± 0.35, moderate).

Conclusions:

The study did not emphasize interference on strength development after INT but showed a slight impairment of slow concentric torque production gains after SIT. Compared with INT, SIT would appear to be more effective to develop VO2peak and RSA but could induce lower muscle-strength gains, especially at low velocity.

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Kaelin C. Young, Kristina L. Kendall, Kaitlyn M. Patterson, Priyanka D. Pandya, Ciaran M. Fairman and Samuel W. Smith

Purpose:

To assess changes in body composition, lumbar-spine bone mineral density (BMD), and rowing performance in collegelevel rowers over a competition season.

Methods:

Eleven Division I college rowers (mean ± SD 21.4 ± 3.7 y) completed 6 testing sessions throughout the course of their competition season. Testing included measurements of fat mass, bone-free lean mass (BFLM), body fat (%BF), lumbar-spine BMD, and 2000-m time-trial performance. After preseason testing, rowers participated in a periodized training program, with the addition of resistance training to the traditional aerobic-training program.

Results:

Significant (P < .05) improvements in %BF, total mass, and BFLM were observed at midseason and postseason compared with preseason. Neither lumbar-spine BMD nor BMC significantly changed over the competitive season (P > .05). Finally, rowing performance (as measured by 2000-m time and average watts achieved) significantly improved at midseason and postseason compared with preseason.

Conclusion:

Our results highlight the efficacy of a seasonal concurrent training program serving to improve body composition and rowing performance, as measured by 2000-m times and average watts, among college-level rowers. Our findings offer practical applications for coaches and athletes looking to design a concurrent strength and aerobic training program to improve rowing performance across a season.

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Dean Ritchie, Justin Keogh, Steven Stern, Peter Reaburn, Fergus O’Connor and Jonathan D. Bartlett

professional development blocks, collectively demonstrating a challenging and time-consuming weekly schedule. Given the dense schedule and physical training demands, it is common practice for team-sport athletes to complete same day concurrent training (CT). Concurrent training is defined as the simultaneous

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Gavriil G. Arsoniadis, Gregory C. Bogdanis, Gerasimos Terzis and Argyris G. Toubekis

-term concurrent training effects, there is a need to understand the acute effects of strength training on subsequent endurance training quality and performance. This information is critical for well-trained swimmers engaged in daily or twice a day training for long periods during their preparation for competitive

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Nicolas Berryman, Iñigo Mujika, Denis Arvisais, Marie Roubeix, Carl Binet and Laurent Bosquet

(1975 to December 7, 2015) and Web of Science (1945 to December 7, 2015) were searched using the terms [TOPIC: (“strength training” OR “weight training” OR “resistance training” OR “power training” OR “plyometric training” OR “concurrent training” OR “combined strength and endurance training” OR

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Espen Tønnessen, Vegard Rasdal, Ida S. Svendsen, Thomas A. Haugen, Erlend Hem and Øyvind Sandbakk

Performing at an elite level in Nordic combined (NC) requires both the explosiveness required for ski jumping performance and the endurance capacity required for cross-country skiing.

Purpose:

To describe the characteristics of world-class NC athletes’ training and determine how endurance and non–endurance (ie, strength, power, and ski jumping) training is periodized.

Methods:

Annual training characteristics and the periodization of endurance and non–endurance training were determined by analyzing the training diaries of 6 world-class NC athletes.

Results:

Of 846 ± 72 annual training hours, 540 ± 37 h were endurance training, with 88.6% being low-, 5.9% moderate-, and 5.5% high-intensity training. While training frequency remained relatively constant, the total training volume was reduced from the general preparatory to the competition phase, primarily due to less low- and moderate-intensity training (P < .05). A total of 236 ± 55 h/y were spent as non–endurance training, including 211 ± 44 h of power and ski-jump-specific training (908 ± 165 ski jumps and ski-jump imitations). The proportion of non–endurance training increased significantly toward the competition phase (P < .05).

Conclusion:

World-class NC athletes reduce the volume of low- and moderate-intensity endurance training toward the competition phase, followed by an increase in the relative contribution of power and ski-jump training. These data provide novel insight on how successful athletes execute their training and may facilitate more-precise coaching of future athletes in this sport. In addition, this information is of high relevance for the training organization of other sports that require optimization of 2 fundamentally different physical capacities.