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Kathryn Dainty Davis

As one of the early graduate students of the Penn State Biomechanics Laboratory (1970–1974), I had the pleasure of being involved in the lab developed under the direction of Dr. Richard Nelson. His vision of applying engineering principles to human movement, particularly through the vehicle of sport analysis, inspired many to commit to a career of biomechanical exploration of the many aspects of human movement. By bringing many international scholars to the lab, he exposed his students to innovative and unique approaches to research. By developing technical applications, he made biomechanical inquiry more scientific and applicable. By caring for and mentoring a new generation of scientists and providing them the direction and tools they would need to establish their own labs and careers, he helped us become teachers, researchers, consultants, and mentors for a new generation of students. His love of life inspired us all to further the groundbreaking work he had begun and continued throughout his amazing career. His contributions to the field of biomechanics through his visionary establishment of societies, journals, collegial relationships, and consulting skills have served our community well. It was an honor and a privilege to know and learn from him.

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Emily Sparvero, Randall Griffiths, and Jacob Tingle

Congratulations! As a student in this class, you will be working as a member of Texas Sport Leadership Consultants (TSLC), a consulting company owned by three sport management professors from three different universities. TSLC strives to engage and assist sport professionals throughout south and

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Ross Wadey, Kylie Roy-Davis, Lynne Evans, Karen Howells, Jade Salim, and Ceri Diss

account for the factors (e.g., prior relationships with injured athletes) and processes (e.g., transactions between practitioners and injured athletes) that inform how sport psychology consultants (SPCs) can work with athletes to facilitate SIRG. These factors and processes have long been deemed vitally

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Zachary McCarver, Shelby Anderson, Justine Vosloo, and Sebastian Harenberg

Certified mental-performance consultants (CMPCs, through the Association for Applied Sport Psychology [AASP]) often work with athletes from a variety of culturally and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds. For example, from 2008 to 2018 across all divisions of the National College Collegiate

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Stephen Pack, Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Stacy Winter, and Brian Hemmings

outcomes are influenced by the client–consultant relationship (e.g.,  Longstaff & Gervis, 2016 ; Petitpas, Giges, & Danish, 1999 ; Sharp, Hodge, & Danish, 2015 ). For example, the working alliance (i.e., the agreement between the client and the consultant regarding shared goals, tasks, and emotional

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Tyler Makepeace and Bradley W. Young

, might effectively support MAs’ sport activity. Decades of evidence-based literature has underlined the value of athletes pursuing psychological skills and strategies in concert with trained mental performance (or sport psychology) consultants . Sport psychology theory and practice continues to evolve

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John Partington and Terry Orlick

Individual interviews were conducted with 17 Canadian Olympic coaches in order to assess sport psychology consultants and services provided to their athletes and teams in the 4 years leading up to the 1984 Olympic Games. The coaches represented a wide range of sports; all but 2 had worked directly with a sport psychology consultant in preparing their athletes for the Olympics. A total of 21 consultants were reviewed and evaluated. The coaches outlined their personal criteria for assessing the effectiveness of a sport psychology consultant and his or her mental training program. A consensus regarding desired personal consultant characteristics is presented, as well as coaches’ reasons for retaining or terminating the services of a sport psychology consultant.

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John Partington and Terry Orlick

An evaluation inventory was developed to help sport psychology consultants assess and improve the field services they provide. Consultant characteristics included in the inventory were based on extensive interviews with Olympic athletes and coaches. The inventory was administered to 104 Canadian Olympic athletes who assessed 26 sport psychology consultants. Data from this survey were used to determine the validity and reliability of the Sport Psychology Consultant Evaluation Form (CEF). Practical suggestions are provided for enhancing the quality of sport psychology consultation services through the use of the CEF.

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Tsz Lun (Alan) Chu, Ellea Bachmeier, and Taylor Mair

psychology professionals’ specialization and employment, an indirect indication of gender stereotyping and representation ( Fink, 2016 ; Hardin & Greer, 2009 ). This study, therefore, examined the data from Certified Mental Performance Consultants (CMPCs), who are mostly based in the United States, as the

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Cassandra M. Seguin and Diane M. Culver

considered psychological and social needs from two expert populations: (a) athletes who have firsthand SRC experience and (b) mental performance consultants (MPCs) whose professional expertise puts them in an optimal position to identify and provide athletes support for these needs. Athletes and MPCs One