Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 328 items for :

  • "consulting" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Patricia Santos de Oliveira, Mey de Abreu van Munster, Joslei Viana de Souza and Lauren J. Lieberman

students with disabilities in different contexts ( Caetano & Mendes, 2008 ; Machado & Almeida, 2014 ). The concept of education consulting involves a triad of interaction in which three parties generally act collaboratively: the consultant (adapted physical education [APE] teacher) assists the

Restricted access

Martin E. Block and Philip Conatser

The purpose of this paper is to broaden the knowledge base regarding consulting in adapted physical education (APE). First, a definition and key characteristics of consulting are discussed. Second, a review of theoretical foundations and major characteristics of the two most common types of consulting models used in APE—behavior and organizational consulting—is presented. Third, the four most common roles of APE consultants—advocacy, trainer, fact finder, and process specialist—are examined. Fourth, the most common four-step consulting process (entry, diagnosis, implementation, and disengagement) is outlined and discussed. Finally, three major barriers to APE consulting—time to consult, administrative support, and attitudes and expectations of the consultee—are analyzed.

Restricted access

Craig A. Wrisberg and Johannes Raabe

provide mental training for student-athletes; however, any consulting I delivered was at the request of the respective student-athlete, since mental training was not a mandatory activity. It should be noted that individuals competing at the NCAA Division I level face a wide variety of time demands

Restricted access

Robin S. Vealey, Robin Cooley, Emma Nilsson, Carly Block and Nick Galli

psychophysiological measures, the use of questionnaires (particularly psychological inventories using rating scales as begun by Thomasius) elicits the most discussion and debate in terms of appropriateness and usefulness (e.g., “practical” validity) in interventions or consulting with athletes (e.g.,  Anshel

Restricted access

Lee-Ann Sharp and Ken Hodge

The purpose of this study was to investigate the components necessary for the development of an effective applied sport psychology consulting relationship between a sport psychology consultant (SPC) and a coach. To address this purpose, two SPC-Coach consulting relationship case studies will be presented. Following purposeful sampling methods, members of two SPC-Coach consulting relationships (2 SPCs and 2 elite coaches) participated in individual interviews to discuss their perceptions of effective consulting relationships. Inductive \content analysis was conducted to search for common themes both within and across the two case studies (Weber, 1990). Three categories emerged with shared similarities between both case study relationships as important to the development of effective consulting relationships between SPCs and coaches; (a) SPC knowledge; (b) trust; and (c) friendship. In addition, two categories individual to each of the case study consulting relationships emerged; (d) SPC fitting in with team culture; and (e) flexibility.

Restricted access

Jim Taylor

This article explores the challenges of building a successful private consulting practice in sport psychology. The author examines the extant literature on the experiences of recent graduates as they enter the field of applied sport psychology and also describes how his own educational and early career experiences have shaped his practice. A four-part approach to consulting with athletes is outlined, along with detailed information regarding practice development, clientele identification, and fee structures. The personal qualities essential for creating a successful consulting practice in sport psychology are also explored. Finally, a five-stage model of career development provides guidelines for maintaining and growing a successful consulting practice.

Restricted access

Zachary McCarver, Shelby Anderson, Justine Vosloo and Sebastian Harenberg

reported a completed doctoral degree ( n  = 197, 75.8%). More than half worked in private consulting ( n  = 164, 63.1%) and/or an academic setting ( n  = 132, 50.8%). Most of the participants practiced in the United States ( n  = 193, 74.2%). The vast majority of the sample identified as White ( n  = 215

Restricted access

Wayne Halliwell

This article relates experiences and knowledge gained in providing sport psychology consulting services to professional hockey teams over a 6-year period. The process of getting involved in professional hockey is described and the importance of obtaining ample consulting experience before working with professional athletes is discussed. Philosophical and organizational components of service delivery are presented along with the range and type of service provided. The development of trust and confidence in the player/consultant relationship is seen as the key to effective sport psychology consulting. Also, the importance of being able to read situations, fit into the professional sports environment, and adopt a low-key, behind-the-scenes approach is discussed.

Restricted access

Amanda J. Visek, Brandonn S. Harris and Lindsey C. Blom

While there are significant benefits to be gleaned from the delivery of sport psychology services to youth athletes, there does not appear to be a sport psychology consulting model that adequately addresses the unique needs and organizational structure of a youth sport population. The authors have both integrated and extended the current paucity of literature in an attempt to provide sport psychology practitioners with an inclusive youth sport consulting model. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to introduce the Youth Sport Consulting Model (YSCM) which serves as an educational framework for guiding and supporting sport psychology practitioners in the implementation and delivery of sport psychology services for young athletes and their sport organizations.

Full access

Kenneth Ravizza

Consulting issues that confront applied sport psychology personnel in gaining entry to working with athletic teams on a long-term basis are discussed. Barriers to entry are examined at the onset and it is emphasized that these obstacles must be overcome by all consultants. Strategies for overcoming such barriers include establishing respect and trust of key athletic personnel, gaining the head coach’s respect, knowing the sport, becoming knowledgeable of the coach’s orientation and team dynamics, gaining support at all levels of the organization, clarifying services to be provided, and making presentations to coaching staffs and athletes. Additional guidelines are discussed in an effort to better clarify the role of the applied sport psychology consultant. These include clarifying one’s own consulting needs, maintaining confidentiality, the need for open and honest communication, support demonstrated by coaches, and collecting research data while consulting.