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Madeleine Pape and Fiona McLachlan

Coronavirus crisis is now revealing. We consider how the feminist notion of interdependence  could aid in reconfiguring the unequal landscape of sport postpandemic, especially if sports governing bodies, sports media, and other powerful actors commit to recognizing the diverse contributions that are needed

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Elsa Kristiansen, Therese Dille and Simon Tærud Day

down to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) President Aleksander Čeferin labeled COVID-19 as “the biggest crisis that football faced in its history” ( Conn, 2020 , para. 2). Here, we have discussed, by using information obtained from an interview with the

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Brody J. Ruihley, Jason Simmons, Andrew C. Billings and Rich Calabrese

When scholars examine issues of reputation, image, and/or crisis communication in sport media, they typically focus on a player or team experiencing trials and tribulations ( Billings, Coombs, & Brown, 2018 ). Various strategies are employed, and, depending on the circumstances, fans generally find

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Sonja Utz, Felix Otto and Tim Pawlowski

asymmetrical relationships that develop between media users and media figures ( Hartmann, Stuke, & Daschmann, 2008 ; Horton & Wohl, 1956 ) and may play an important role, especially in times of crisis, such as an early elimination in an important tournament ( Sanderson & Emmons, 2014 ). In general, a crisis

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Argyro Elisavet Manoli

An escalating number of crises appear in the sport industry in general and the football industry in particular that make the area of crisis communication an increasingly important matter in both the everyday running and the long-term viability of football. However, the sensitivity of the topic makes an extensive analysis on current practice in crisis communications a particularly challenging task. This study examines how crisis communications is managed by investigating the current practices and techniques employed in English Premier League clubs, as they were presented by communications professionals employed in the clubs. The analysis of the clubs’ practices underlines the lack of proactivity and presents the most popular strategies of crisis-communications management: “Wait for the dust to settle” and “React promptly before the noise grows.” In addition, an underdocumented technique is examined: the use of the informal personal relationships between the employees of the clubs and the members of the media. This study also introduces the “crisis communications management in football” model, which illustrates the practices identified through this study and can potentially act as a guide for crisis-communications analysis in a number of other industries.

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Laura Richardson Walton and Kevin D. Williams

An organization’s initial response to a crisis can dictate the tone of its sustained response throughout the crisis, as well as stakeholders’ reactions to the incident. When news of the deaths of professional wrestler Chris Benoit, his wife, and their 7-yr-old son broke, World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) immediately paid tribute to the superstar. A memorial show to Benoit’s career aired as investigators searched the family’s home. The investigation revealed that Benoit murdered his wife and son before taking his own life, resulting in WWE’s retraction of its earlier tributes. Furthermore, the organization had to respond to the swarm of speculation that steroids—and WWE’s lax policy on their use—were to blame. This case study analyzes WWE’s immediate response strategies to their employee’s family’s deaths and the subsequent strategies used on learning that the employee was implicated. Qualitative analysis of corporate documents and official statements seeks to provide direction regarding how similar organizations should respond in the days immediately after tragic events when employees may be implicated.

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Chad D. McEvoy and Dianna P. Gray

The Little State University Athletic Department faces an immediate budgeting crisis. Due to state budgeting woes, the legislature has reduced its allocation to Little State significantly for the upcoming year. The impact of this reduction included a loss of $800,000 to the athletic department, which represents approximately ten percent of the athletic budget. LSU Athletic Director Beth Duncan must determine how to best make the necessary cuts while preserving a strong department and minimizing the impact on student-athletes.

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Christiana Schallhorn and Jessica Kunert

( Wann, Grieve, Zapalac, & Pease, 2008 ). With the absence of sporting competitions, many of these needs for solidarity and community, social integration and communication, entertainment and escapism cannot be satisfied during the Coronavirus crisis. But satisfying these needs became all the more

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Guest Editors: Brody J. Ruihley and Bo Li INTRODUCTION Sport and the Coronavirus Crisis Special Issue: An Introduction Brody J. Ruihley * Bo Li * 27 08 2020 1 09 2020 13 3 289 293 10.1123/ijsc.2020-0254 ijsc.2020-0254 INDUSTRY INTERVIEWS Interview With Josh Krulewitz, ESPN Vice President

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Timothy Mirabito, Robin Hardin and Joshua R. Pate

administration’s crisis response that has drawn substantial criticism for its general incoherence ( Nicholas & Friedman, 2020 ). Fauci has relied on objective, empirical data to support his public statements, often resisting speculation. His approach squares precisely with what Coombs, Holladay, and Claeys