Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 70 items for :

  • "critical reflection" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Mark A. Uphill and Brian Hemmings

The aim of this paper is to present a critical reflection on mental toughness using a creative analytic practice. In particular, we move from intrapersonal technical reflections to an altogether more interpersonal cultural analysis that (re)considers some of the assumptions that can underpin sport psychology practice. Specifically, in the ripples that extend from these initial technical reflections, we argue that it is important to understand vulnerability, and consider (a) wounded healers, (b) the ideology of individualism, and (c) the survivor bias to help make sense of current thinking and applied practice. Emerging from these ripples are a number of implications (naming elephants, tellability, neoliberalism) from which sport psychologists may reflect upon to enhance their own practice. In making visible the invisible, we conclude that vulnerability can no longer be ignored in sport psychology discourse, research, and practice. Should this story of vulnerability resonate, we encourage you, where appropriate to share this story.

Restricted access

Louisa R. Peralta, Claire L. Marvell and Wayne G. Cotton

importance of critical reflection in higher education and across disciplinary fields is widely recognized. Despite the rhetoric around the importance of reflection for ongoing learning in higher education and beyond, there is scant literature or theoretical guidance on a systematic, developmental approach to

Restricted access

Chris G. Harwood and Sam N. Thrower

its infancy, these studies highlight the value of exploring visual, cognitive, and auditory processes (e.g., through video, feedback, questioning, decision making) to engage young athletes in ecologically strong interventions that can enhance performance through improved skill acquisition. Critical

Restricted access

Zoe Knowles and David Gilbourne

The present article contemplates the future of reflective practice in the domain of applied sport psychology and, in so doing, seeks to engender further critical debate and comment. More specifically, the discussion to follow revisits the topic of ‘reflective-levels’ and builds a case for ‘critical reflection’ as an aspiration for those engaged in pedagogy or applied sport psychology training regimens. Assumptions and commentators associated with critical social science (e.g., Habermas, 1974; Carr & Kemmis, 1986), action research (e.g., Carr & Kemmis, 1986; Leitch & Day, 2000), and critical reflection (e.g., Morgan, 2007) suggest a number of foundation points from which critical reflection might be better understood. Finally, writing about ones-self via the processes of critical reflection and through reflective practice more generally are briefly considered in cautionary terms (Bleakley, 2000; du Preez, 2008). Auto-ethnography in sport (Gilbourne, 2002; Stone, 2009) is finally proposed as one potential source of illustration and inspiration for reflective practitioners in terms of both content and style.

Restricted access

Zoe Knowles, Jonathan Katz and David Gilbourne

This paper examines reflective practice by illustrating and commenting upon aspects of an elite sport psychology practitioner’s reflective processes. Extracts from a practitioner’s reflective diary, maintained during attendance at a major sporting event, focused upon issues that relate to on-going relationships and communication with fellow practitioners and athletes. Authors one and three offered subsequent comment on these accounts to facilitate movement toward critical reflection via an intrapersonal process creating considerations for the practitioners with regard to skills and personal development. These issues are discussed in relation to pragmatic topics such as “staged” and “layered” reflection encouraged by author collaboration and shared writing within the present paper. We argue these outcomes against more philosophical/opaque considerations such as the progression of critical reflection and critical social science.

Restricted access

David Kirk

There has been growing advocacy for an inquiry-oriented approach to teacher education in the wake of developments in educational practice and theory, particularly through the action-research movement and critical curriculum inquiry. The inquiry-oriented approach argues that teacher education cannot be neutral, but must instead acknowledge the inherently political and ethical dimensions of the teaching act. This paper addresses the problem of developing a program for an inquiry-oriented approach and suggests that teacher education must focus on knowledge that begins with, and supports, the teaching act and portrays teacher education as a process of critical reflection on the teaching act itself.

Restricted access

Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

Studies of the influence of conventional methods courses on preservice classroom teachers (PCTs) have provided mixed results. The purpose of the study described in this paper was to break new ground and examine the effects of a critically oriented 6-week methods course and a 9-week early field experience on one class of 24 PCTs. Data were collected during and immediately after the early field experience by asking PCTs to complete critical incident reflective sheets, success/nonsuccess critical incident reflective sheets, and an anonymous reflective questionnaire. Analytic induction was used to analyze them. Results indicated that PCTs were able to reflect at a technical and practical level and achieved many of the goals at which conventional methods courses are aimed. Conversely, there were few examples of critical reflection. Personal, cultural, and programmatic factors explaining this finding are discussed.

Restricted access

Beatriz Muros Ruiz and Juan-Miguel Fernández-Balboa

Many researchers and theoretical scholars have questioned the social-transformative claims of critical pedagogy (CP) in physical education. Most of these criticisms center on its application in physical education teacher education (PETE). Our knowledge of the perspectives and practices of physical education teacher educators (PETEs) who claim to practice CP, however, is still tentative at best; consequently, the reason for its limited success are still largely unknown. To shed some light on this issue, 17 PETEs who claimed to practice critical pedagogy were interviewed at length regarding their definition of CP, including its principles and purposes, and their pedagogical practices. The results show that more than half of the PETEs did not fully understand the main principles and purposes of CP as presented in the literature, and that many of their methods were incongruent with these principles and purposes. This lack of understanding of CP might be an important factor contributing to its limited success in PETE. In view of this, caution and critical reflection are recommended when engaging in this type of pedagogy. Some implications for PETE are provided as well.

Restricted access

Velina B. Brackebusch

the world, similar to what others encounter in service-learning courses. According to Pigza ( 2010 ), “In the midst of critical reflection, students become constructive critics of themselves, society, policies, and course content” (p. 75). All of the students were able to benefit from the in

Restricted access

Michael J. Diacin

regard to improving deficiencies and minimizing risks they found. Finally, students provided their critical reflection with regard to their findings. Within this reflective component, they articulated on the ways in which the project enhanced their knowledge with regard to managing a multipurpose sport