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Andrew C. Billings, Paul J. MacArthur, Simon Licen, and Dan Wu

Media renderings of the Olympics continue to offer opportunities for hypernationalism. This study analyzes the same basketball game (U.S. vs. China in men’s basketball at the 2008 Summer Olympics) through the lens of 4 different telecasts in the United States, China, Slovenia, and Canada. Results illuminate us/them and collectivist/individualist dichotomies, differing themes of redemption and expectation, and stark contrasts in network style and content in game coverage. Ramifications for theory, fans, and network gatekeepers are postulated.

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Kathleen A. Martin Ginis

Over the past decade, researchers have faced increasing pressure to bridge the gap between the generation of new knowledge and the translation of that knowledge into applications and products that can benefit society. SCI Action Canada is an example of a community-university partnership approach to bridging the research generation-knowledge translation gap. It is an alliance of 30 community-based organizations and university-based researchers working together to increase physical activity participation among people living with a spinal cord injury (SCI). This paper provides an overview of activities undertaken by SCI Action Canada, presented within the framework of key principles of effective knowledge translation. Recommendations are made for the cultivation of successful community-university partnerships to develop, evaluate, and implement physical activity innovations.

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Ramon Spaaij and Nico Schulenkorf

Recent research has examined how sports events and sport-for-development projects can create, sustain, and maximize positive social impacts for local communities. This article takes this debate forward by arguing that the cultivation of safe space is a key ingredient of sport-for-development management and community event leverage. Safe space is conceptualized as a multidimensional process that involves physical, psychological/affective, sociocultural, political, and experimental dimensions. Drawing on empirical findings from Sri Lanka, Israel, and Brazil, the article shows how these dimensions of safe space operate and interact in practice, and identifies practical strategies that sport managers, policymakers, and practitioners can use to cultivate safe spaces in and through sports projects and events.

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Jennifer Smith Maguire

The contemporary United States fitness industry, in conjunction with the medical endorsement of exercise and the marketing of lifestyle consumption, has made possible the emergence and rapid growth of health and fitness services. This paper brings together the sociological fields of work, consumption, and physical culture, suggesting how the structure and organization of personal training impacts upon how fitness is sold. Drawing from interviews with personal trainers, the occupation is discussed as a combination of frontline service work, emotional labor, and flexible work strategies, resulting in a variety of job roles: the representation of the fitness club, the brokering of clients’ consumer relationships with the fitness industry, the motivation of clients through service relationships, and the entrepreneurial cultivation of a client base and semi-professional authority.

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Ross Flowers

Acting as a liaison between a university’s counseling and psychological services and intercollegiate athletics department is an emerging alternative career path in professional psychology. This article details how a psychologist-sport psychologist liaison role can provide both psychological counseling and sport psychology consulting in a university setting. In addition, the author outlines the mission and goals of such a position, the departments within which this work is carried out, how psychology and applied sport psychology services are conceptualized and integrated, and the responsibilities and service duties of a counseling psychologist and sport psychologist to university student-athletes, coaches, and staff. It is hoped that illustrating this relationship between university counseling and psychological services and athletic departments will demonstrate how campus resources can be employed to assist student-athletes with performance enhancement, personal enrichment, and life skills development. In addition, the author offers examples of ways that athletic coaching, administration, and program development can be enhanced through cultivation of positive relationships between university counseling and psychological services, and intercollegiate athletic departments.

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Hans C. Schmidt

). One especially relevant perspective is that of cultivation theory. Cultivation Theory The premise of cultivation theory, as developed by Gerbner ( 1969 ; Gerbner & Gross, 1976 ), is that much of the way that people understand the world comes not from personal experience but from exposure to media

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Jerred Junqi Wang

government, the facilitation of bicycle export to overseas markets, and the cultivation of a culture of sacrifice. At the same time, as Turpin points out, the positive impact of World War I on the bicycle industry was more like a bandage than a panacea. In Chapter 3, Turpin examines the responses of the

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Blake Bennett and Glenn Fyall

” ( Inoue, 1998 , p. 84). The application of budō -centric (martial arts-centric) ideals, firmly established around the principles of ningen keisei (character development or human cultivation) and concern for discipline and sacrifice, were eventually applied to Japanese practices and pedagogies of

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Richard Shusterman

number of research hubs in the United States, Europe, and China ( Shusterman, 2018–2019 ). Somaesthetics can be briefly defined as the critical study and meliorative cultivation of the experience and use of the living body (or soma) as the site of sensory appreciation (aesthesis) and performative and

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Amy Baker, Mary A. Hums, Yoseph Mamo, and Damon P.S. Andrew

four phases: initiation, cultivation, separation, and redefinition ( Chao, 1997 ). Furthermore, certain environmental factors (e.g., opportunities for mentoring, organizational climate) or barriers (e.g., access to mentors, fear of initiating a relationship) may inhibit or facilitate the process