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Louis Harrison, Russell L. Carson and Joe Burden

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the common assumption that teachers of color (TOC) are more culturally competent than White teachers by assessing physical education teachers’ cultural competency. A secondary purpose was to ascertain the possible differences in cultural competence levels of White teachers in diverse school settings versus those in more racially homogenous schools. One hundred and ninety physical education teachers from two states in the southeastern U.S. completed a demographic questionnaire and the Multicultural Teaching Competency Scale (MTCS) (Spanierman et al., 2006). The MTCS consists of two subscales; multicultural teaching knowledge (MTK), and multicultural teaching skills (MTS). MANCOVA analyses indicated significant differences with TOC scoring higher in both MTK and MTS than White teachers. Results also indicated that White teachers in city school settings scored significantly higher in MTK than those from more rural school. Results and implications for teacher preparation and professional development are discussed.

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Miranda Brunett and René Revis Shingles

culturally competent or are perceived by their patients as being culturally competent. However, does a health care provider’s level of cultural competence influence the provider–patient relationship? Do patients care? Limited studies have examined the effect provider cultural competence has on patient

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Elizabeth Domangue and Russell Lee Carson

Following the devastation of hurricane Katrina, a university located in the south-eastern United States created a service-learning program. This program was established so that physical education teacher education (PETE) students could provide physical activities to children living in a temporary, government-funded housing community. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the service-learning program shaped preservice teachers’ cultural competency. The participants were 16 PETE students in a curriculum development course. A questionnaire was used to assess changes in the students’ cultural competency. Reflective journals and interviews were qualitative data sources used to identify significant elements of the service-learning program that elicited thoughts about the role of cultural competency in teaching. Findings revealed that there were changes in cultural competency. Triangulation of the data suggested that the service-learning participants identified consistent engagement, exposure to another culture, and an engaged instructor as key contributors to cultural competency within the service-learning program.

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Knud Ryom, Mads Ravn, Rune Düring and Kristoffer Henriksen

that is culturally competent. A particular expression of this is the coaches’ acceptance of the individual differences their player expresses both on the pitch and off. The U11–U14 coordinator emphasized that diversity was a good thing and that the club drew on different cultures: We are from the

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Zachary McCarver, Shelby Anderson, Justine Vosloo and Sebastian Harenberg

conference from 1986 to 2007 discussed cultural diversity ( Fisher & Roper, 2014 ; Kamphoff, Gill, Araki, & Hammond, 2010 ). Before 2018, CMPC practitioners were not required to obtain training in cultural competency ( AASP CMPC Handbook, 2018 ). Previous findings suggest that some were unwilling to seek

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Trevor J. Egli, Leslee A. Fisher and Noah Gentner

In this paper, the experiences of nine AASP-certified sport psychology consultants (SPCs) working with athletes who invoke spirituality in their consulting sessions are described. After a brief review of terms and literature, consultants’ own words from interview transcripts are used to illustrate four major themes. These were: (a) SPC definitions of spirituality; (b) SPC definitions of faith: (c) SPC perceived challenges; and (d) spirituality implementation within consulting session. We conclude by addressing why we believe that spirituality is a cultural competence component and why sport psychology consultants should engage with the ongoing development of cultural competency.

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Joe W. Burden Jr. and Glenn W. Lambie

As social and cultural diversity increases in the United States, coaches frequently interact with athletes from a wide range of backgrounds. Therefore, it would be useful if coaches had established guidelines for best practices to support their socially and ethically responsible work with athletes. However, coaching organizations have not published best practice standards specifically for coaches’ work with socially and culturally diverse athletes. This article proposes Sociocultural Competencies for Sport Coaches (SCSC) to support positive coach-athlete relationships. Specifically, the paper (a) reviews standards for social and cultural competencies used in similar professions, (b) introduces SCSC to the field of coaching education, and (c) presents competencies, standards, and benchmarks to guide the implementation of SCSC with diverse athletes.

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Takahiro Sato and Samuel Russell Hodge

The purpose of this study was to describe and explain the teaching experiences of African American physical education teacher candidates in secondary physical education programs at urban schools. The research design was explanatory multiple-case study situated in positioning theory (Harré & van Langenhove, 1999). The participants were seven African American physical education teacher candidates. The data sources were interviews, self-reflective journal logs, and e-portfolios. The data were analyzed using a constant comparative method (Boeije, 2010). The thematic findings were: (a) tacit positioning (unconscious and unintentional), (b) self–other discourse, and (c) reflective positioning. The study’s findings offer additional empirical evidence that physical education teacher education programs must do more to better prepare teacher candidates for working in urban schools with greater cultural competency and higher self-efficacy.

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Megan N. Sears, Dani M. Moffit and Rebecca M. Lopez

, religion, sex, gender, and sexual orientation, all of which healthcare providers should consider in order to provide culturally-competent health care. 3 – 5 Culture plays a role in the way an individual perceives the care being provided, therefore affecting the management of their health condition. 4 The