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Paul M. Vanderburgh and Ronald E. DeMeersman

The 12-Minute Stationary Cycle Ergometer Test (12MCET) has been developed and validated as an accurate VO2peak prediction test particularly for the injured (7). Prediction is based on body weight and total work done in 12 min at a resistance setting of 2.5 kp (men) and 2.0 kp (women) on the Monark cycle ergometer. In the development of the 12MCET a small number of subjects stated a preference for a higher resistance setting than 2.5 kp. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of the 12MCET with a resistance setting of 3.0 kp for a sample of 30 college-age men. When applied to the 12MCET, use of the 3.0 kp resistance setting overpredicted actual VO2peak by a mean of 175 ml • min−1 (p = .02). We concluded that the use of a 3.0 kp resistance setting for the 12MCET is inappropriate and that any resistance setting other than that prescribed should not be used without proper validation.

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Paul M. Vanderburgh

Previously there existed no efficacious maximal effort, VO2peak prediction test for subjects who, because of injury, can exercise at high intensity only on a device such as a cycle ergometer. This study's purpose was to develop and validate such a test, a 12-Minute Stationary Cycle Ergometer Test (12MSCET), for college-age physically active men and women. For 60 college-age men and women, and a gender-based resistance setting, the total work done on the 12MSCET and body weight were found to be highly predictive of VO2peak, measured via open circuit spirometry. Furthermore, the torques required for such a test are, for this sample, approximately 50% of those required in other predictive protocols. To date, the 12MSCET has been used for VO2peak assessment of over 300 military cadets who, because of injury, found cycling their only efficacious high-intensity aerobic modality.

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Anita Hurtig Wennlöf, Agneta Yngve, and Michael Sjöström

Background:

Steadily declining physical activity, especially among children, and the possible adverse health outcomes such behavior could precede, is a general concern. We evaluated whether a presumed decrease in physical activity has been accompanied with a decrease in aerobic fitness of Swedish children.

Methods:

A maximum cycle ergometer test was performed in 935 children age 9 and 15 y, and the results were compared with previously reported data.

Results:

Estimated peak oxygen uptake (mL × min-1 × kg-1) in 9-y-old subjects was 37.3 in girls and 42.8 in boys; and in 15-y-olds, 40.4 in girls and 51.5 in boys. In the 9-y-olds, aerobic fitness remained lower in the current study compared to earlier data, but in the 15-y-olds the result did not differ from the 1952 data after adjustment for methodological differences.

Conclusion:

Our results suggest a change towards decreased aerobic fitness in 9-y-old, but not in 15-y-old, Swedish children during a 50-y time span.

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George Wehbe, Tim Gabbett, Dan Dwyer, Christopher McLellan, and Sam Coad

Purpose:

To compare a novel sprint test on a cycle ergometer with a countermovement-jump (CMJ) test for monitoring neuromuscular fatigue after Australian rules football match play.

Methods:

Twelve elite under-18 Australian rules football players (mean ± SD age 17.5 ± 0.6 y, stature 184.7 ± 8.8 cm, body mass 75.3 ± 7.8 kg) from an Australian Football League club’s Academy program performed a short sprint test on a cycle ergometer along with a single CMJ test 1 h prematch and 1, 24, and 48 h postmatch. The cycle-ergometer sprint test involved a standardized warm-up, a maximal 6-s sprint, a 1-min active recovery, and a 2nd maximal 6-s sprint, with the highest power output of the 2 sprints recorded as peak power (PP).

Results:

There were small to moderate differences between postmatch changes in cycle-ergometer PP and CMJ PP at 1 (ES = 0.49), 24 (ES = –0.85), and 48 h postmatch (ES = 0.44). There was a substantial reduction in cycle-ergometer PP at 24 h postmatch (ES = –0.40) compared with 1 h prematch.

Conclusions:

The cycle-ergometer sprint test described in this study offers a novel method of neuromuscular-fatigue monitoring in team-sport athletes and specifically quantifies the concentric component of the fatigue-induced decrement of force production in muscle, which may be overlooked by a CMJ test.

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Suzan Tug, Matthias Mehdorn, Susanne Helmig, Sarah Breitbach, Tobias Ehlert, and Perikles Simon

Purpose:

Intensive exercise is known to be accompanied by a rapid release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA). The physiological significance of cfDNA release for performance diagnostics has not been studied. The authors analyzed the release of cfDNA during bicycle exercise and its correlation with physiological parameters.

Methods:

Eleven male athletes performed an incremental cycling test. Venous blood was collected before and immediately after exercise and after 90 min of recovery. Since the amount of cfDNA is influenced by preanalytical parameters like DNA extraction and quantification method, the authors applied different measurement approaches based on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. They compared a direct measurement procedure not requiring cfDNA extraction for a short (L1PA290) and a long fragment (L1PA2222) and a procedure for extracted cfDNA for a short (LTR570) and long fragment (LTR5323) with primers targeting the repetitive sequences L1PA2 and LTR5 in both assays, respectively.

Results:

With the exception of LTR5323, the procedures revealed significant increases of cfDNA postexercise, whereas the direct approach showed lower interindividual variance in cfDNA values. When linking cfDNA levels to parameters of exercise performance the authors observed that, especially, the measurement based on L1PA2222 correlated significantly with exercise markers. These correlations were similar to the relationship of the performance markers among themselves.

Conclusions:

cfDNA is a possible physiological marker to assess and predict exercise performance in athletes. In addition, the results indicate that using cfDNA as a marker in exercise physiology requires careful selection of a suitable measurement technique, whether it is eluted DNA or directly quantified.

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Alex G. Shaw, Sungwon Chae, Danielle E. Levitt, Jonathan L. Nicholson, Jakob L. Vingren, and David W. Hill

percentage reduction in average torque from the first to final 5 repetitions. Finally, participants completed a constant power cycle ergometer test to exhaustion. The test began with a warm-up, which consisted of 4 minutes of rest, 4 minutes of cycling at a moderate intensity (steady state) using a pedaling

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Gonzalo Varas-Diaz, Savitha Subramaniam, Larissa Delgado, Shane A. Phillips, and Tanvi Bhatt

on the cardiac autonomic regulation, assessed at rest and during a 6-min walk test (6MWT) by HRV analysis, and on estimated maximal O 2 consumption (VO 2 max), assessed by the YMCA submaximal cycle ergometer test, in healthy older adults. We hypothesized that there would be a significant improvement

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Amador García-Ramos, Alejandro Torrejón, Antonio J. Morales-Artacho, Alejandro Pérez-Castilla, and Slobodan Jaric

. 5 Another weakness of standard testing procedures is that the observed single outcomes cannot discern the important capacities of the tested muscles, such as those to produce high force, velocity, and power outputs. 6 To address that issue regarding cycling ergometer tests, the assessment of the

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S. Nicole Fearnbach, Neil M. Johannsen, Corby K. Martin, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Robbie A. Beyl, Daniel S. Hsia, Owen T. Carmichael, and Amanda E. Staiano

body composition, and self-reported pubertal development. The participants also received a brief introduction to the cycle ergometer test with the exercise-testing staff. After completion of the screening procedures at the initial clinic visit, additional eligibility criteria were assessed, as follows

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Ralph Beneke, Tobias G.J. Weber, and Renate M. Leithäuser

reassessed the potential effects of the classic metabolic performance indicators listed herein and tested the hypotheses that the individual freely chosen cadences during an incremental cycle-ergometer test and the relCHO at given BLC levels both depend on the rpm max . Methods To gain the benefit of a wide