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Maureen R. Weiss

important to remember that youth sport research is where it is today because of the vision and achievement of pioneering scholars who forged the path in areas of study ( Weiss, 2016 ; Wiggins, 2013 ). Psychology researchers with interest in sport as a developmental context have largely ignored the long

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Jimmy Sanderson and Katie Brown

harmed the entire sports industry, the impact is particularly acute for youth sports, given the sheer volume of participants and the attending substructure that funds this market. In this commentary, we discussed the psychological, developmental, and economic fallout from an unprecedented stoppage in

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Maureen R. Weiss

I have always taken a developmental perspective in my scholarly work on youth motivation and physical activity, so I am pleased with the opportunity to highlight the benefits of integrating knowledge from motor development and sport psychology. Integrating theories and research can lead to a fuller

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Nima Dehghansai, Daniel Spedale, Melissa J. Wilson, and Joseph Baker

when an athlete acquires an injury (acquired impairment; AI) and enters the Para sport stream versus an athlete who was born with a congenital impairment (CI). In a recent study, Dehghansai, Lemez, Wattie, and Baker ( 2017b ) reported that CI athletes reached various developmental milestones (i

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A. Paige Lane, Sergio L. Molina, DaShae A. Tolleson, Stephen J. Langendorfer, Jacqueline D. Goodway, and David F. Stodden

; Lubans, Morgan, Cliff, Barnett, & Okely, 2010 ). Identification and description of the underlying developmental dimensions that contribute to skilled performance may allow researchers to understand the mechanisms that relate to the development of intra-task variation in relation to specific skills

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Ken Lodewyk and Lauren McNamara

, preferences (recess likes and dislikes and activity choices), space, time, equipment, and location (indoors or outdoors) as a function of gender and developmental level (children and adolescents) during recess. The social–ecological framework ( Bronfenbrenner & Morris, 2006 ) was used as a theoretical guide

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Chantelle Zimmer, Janice Causgrove Dunn, and Nicholas L. Holt

Approximately 5–6% of school-age children are diagnosed with developmental coordination disorder (DCD; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013 ). They experience substantial and persistent difficulties in learning and performing coordinated motor skills starting in early childhood, which

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Deborah Hoare

Although the heterogeneity of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) has been well documented, the search for subtypes within the DCD population with distinguishable profiles has been limited. The present study investigated whether a group of 80 children identified as having DCD could be classified into subtypes based on their performances on six perceptuo-motor tasks. Five clusters were identified and are discussed in terms of current understanding of DCD. This exploratory study supports the notion of heterogeneity within DCD samples, with five patterns of dysfunction emerging.

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Carlo Di Brina, Roberto Averna, Paola Rampoldi, Serena Rossetti, and Roberta Penge

as visual constructive and psychomotor coordination impairments, as a co-occurrence of a developmental coordination disorder (DCD; Jongmans, Smits-Engelsmann, & Schoemaker, 2003 ; Kaplan, Wilson, Dewey, & Crawford, 1998 ). The association of LD with a motor coordination impairment is quite common

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Jane E. Clark

behavior changes across our life span. Not surprisingly, then, this paper is “developmental” in its structure. To give the reader a sense of what it means to be a developmentalist, I will start with a backdrop that forms the basis of my scientific perspective and research work. Years ago, I created a