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Jonathan Leo Ng, Chris Button, Dave Collins, Susan Giblin and Gavin Kennedy

tentatively proposed as: 1) stability, 2) dexterity), 3) locomotion, and 4) object-control. Overall, results from the factorial analysis highlight the multidimensional nature of movement competence and the interdependence between its various constructs ( Bril & Brenière, 1993 ; Davids et al., 2000 ; Rudd et

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Ryoji Kiyama, Kiyohiro Fukudome, Toshiki Hiyoshi, Akihide Umemoto, Yoichi Yoshimoto and Tetsuo Maeda

The aim of this study was to examine the dexterity of both lower extremities in patients with stroke. Twenty patients with stroke and 20 age-matched control subjects participated in this study. To determine the dexterity of the lower extremities, we examined the ability to control muscle force during submaximal contractions in the knee extensor muscles using a force tracking task. The root mean square errors were calculated from the difference between the target and response force. The root mean square error was significantly greater in the affected limb of patients with stroke compared with those of the unaffected limb and the control subjects, and in the unaffected limb compared with that of the control subjects. Furthermore, the root mean square error of the affected limb was related significantly to motor function as determined by Fugl-Myer assessment. These results demonstrate impairment of the dexterity of both the affected and the unaffected lower extremities in patients with stroke.

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Pai-Yun Cheng, Hsiao-Feng Chieh, Chien-Ju Lin, Hsiu-Yun Hsu, Jia-Jin J. Chen, Li-Chieh Kuo and Fong-Chin Su

levels. A custom LabVIEW (LabVIEW, National Instruments, Austin, TX) program provided real-time visual feedback of the applied force made by each digit. Purdue Pegboard Test The Purdue Pegboard Test was developed in 1948, and it was used to examine the manual dexterity and bimanual coordination of the

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Geoffrey D. Broadhead and Gable E. Church

Intact classes of mentally retarded and nonhandicapped children were administered the Physical Dexterity scales of the System of Multicultural Pluralistic Assessment and the short form of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency. Separate discriminant analyses of each data set revealed that the subjects comprised four distinct levels of motor performance. Although overall predicted correct classification was above 65%, misclassifications occurred in each class. Differences resulting from the separate analyses suggest differential program placement for physical education. There is a tendency for the Physical Dexterity data to predict higher levels of motor functioning than the Motor Proficiency data for half of the mentally retarded children.

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Marieke J.G. van Heuvelen, Martin Stevens and Gertrudis I.J.M. Kempen

This study investigated differences in physical-fitness test scores between actively and passively recruited older adults and the consequences thereof for norm-based classification of individuals. Walking endurance, grip strength, hip flexibility, balance, manual dexterity, and reaction time were measured in participants age 57 years or older: 1 sample recruited through media announcements (passively recruited) and 1 sample recruited through personal contact (actively recruited). Classifications on a 5-point scale based on norms were cross-tabulated. Compared with the actively recruited sample, performance of the passively recruited sample was significantly better on all tests except, for women, hip flexibility and manual dexterity. Cross-tabulation of the 2 classifications showed that percentages of agreement varied from 27.4% to 87.4%. Cohen's Kappa varied from .11 to .84. Caution should be used when giving feedback on test performance and subsequently making physical activity recommendations if norms are based on the performance of passively recruited older adults.

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Ulla Lahtinen, Pauli Rintala and Antero Malin

Physical performance of Finnish adolescents (33 females, 44 males) with moderate intellectual disability (ID) was studied over a 30-year period. This study is an extension of Lahtinen’s previous work on documenting the performance of individuals with intellectual disabilities over time. This study consisted of analyzing data from a total of four data collection periods (1973, 1979, 1996, and 2003 in which participants ranged in age from 11-16, 17-22, 34-39 and 41-46 years old, respectively). Improvement from early to late adolescence, and decline during adulthood in abdominal strength/endurance, static balance, and manual dexterity were identified. The male adults with ID were moderately overweight (BMI), but the females with ID were obese. The IQ effect was significant on balance and manual dexterity. The gender differences in adulthood were significant, but differences were not noted for Down syndrome when controlling for IQ.

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Claudia Voelcker-Rehage and Ben Godde

We examined the effect of high frequency tactile stimulation (tHFS) on tactile and motor performance as well as tactile-motor interactions. Seventeen right-handed participants (66–78 years) underwent a pretest (tactile frequency and spatial discrimination task, manual dexterity test, and precision grip task) with their left hand, received 30 min of tHFS on the tips of their left index finger and thumb, and performed a posttest (control group: no stimulation). Results indicated an improvement in frequency and spatial discrimination in the experimental but not the control group. In the precision grip task, however, training effects as found for the control group seem to be blocked in the experimental group. For the manual dexterity task no effect was found. Our data indicate that tHFS positively influences tactile performance. Assuming tHFS-induced plastic reorganization in somatosensory cortex our results give further evidence to the notion of an interrelation between sensory and motor performance.

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Laura S. Ho, Harriet G. Williams and Emily A.W. Hardwick

The study’s objective was to examine the health status, physical activity behaviors, and performance-based functional abilities of individuals classified as being at high or low risk for frailty and to determine which of these characteristics discriminates between the 2 groups. Participants were 78 community-dwelling individuals with an average age of 74 years; 37 were categorized as being at high risk and 42 at low risk for frailty. Logistic-regression analysis indicated that individuals classified as being at high risk for frailty were more likely to have visited the doctor more than 3 times in the past year, experienced a cardiac event, taken more than 4 medications a day, and participated in little or no physical activity. High-risk individuals were more likely to have poor balance, difficulty with mobility, decreased range of motion, poor unimanual dexterity, and difficulty performing activities of daily living than were those classified as being at low risk for frailty.

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Stella Maris Michaelsen, Eliane C. Magdalon and Mindy F. Levin

Decreased dexterity in chronic stroke survivors results in diminished hand use and impacts quality of life. We studied reach-and-grasp coordination and aperture scaling during reach to grasp using different grasp types and object sizes (33–55mm). Chronic stroke survivors with hand paresis and controls grasped cylinders with the whole hand or fingertips. Three stroke subjects with more severe hand paresis had disrupted reach/grasp coordination and used compensatory strategies for arm transport and/or grasping. Nine stroke subjects with less severe paresis scaled aperture to cylinder diameter (p < .001) but had slower movements, used excessive trunk movement, and had prolonged deceleration times. Relative time to maximal grip aperture (TMA) occurred earlier in stroke subjects and in both groups when grasping the small cylinder (p < .002). Despite deficits in reach and grasp, chronic stroke survivors with mild to moderate hand paresis may retain grip aperture scaling to object size for different grasp types.

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Esther Hartman, Suzanne Houwen and Chris Visscher

This study aimed to examine motor performance in deaf elementary school children and its association with sports participation. The population studied included 42 deaf children whose hearing loss ranged from 80 to 120 dB. Their motor skills were assessed with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, and a questionnaire was used to determine their active involvement in organized sports. The deaf children had significantly more borderline and definite motor problems than the normative sample: 62% (manual dexterity), 52% (ball skills), and 45% (balance skills). Participation in organized sports was reported by 43% of the children; these children showed better performance on ball skills and dynamic balance. This study demonstrates the importance of improving deaf children’s motor skill performance, which might contribute positively to their sports participation.