Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,214 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Kimberlee A. Gretebeck, Caroline S. Blaum, Tisha Moore, Roger Brown, Andrzej Galecki, Debra Strasburg, Shu Chen, and Neil B. Alexander

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing epidemic for older adults, affecting 1 in 4 of those aged 65 years and older. 1 Diabetes-related disability occurs in up to two-thirds of older adults with T2DM and is associated with loss of independence, poor quality of life, and increased utilization

Restricted access

Lise Crinière, Claire Lhommet, Agnès Caille, Bruno Giraudeau, Pierre Lecomte, Charles Couet, Jean-Michel Oppert, and David Jacobi

Background:

Increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary time are cornerstones in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, there are few instruments available to measure physical activity in this population. We translated the long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-L) into French and studied its reproducibility and validity in patients with T2DM.

Methods:

Reproducibility was studied by 2 telephone administrations, 8 days apart. Concurrent validity was tested against pedometry for 7 days during habitual life.

Results:

One-hundred forty-three patients with T2DM were recruited (59% males; age: 60.9 ± 10.5 years; BMI: 31.2 ± 5.2 kg/m2; HbA1c: 7.4 ± 1.2%). Intraclass correlation coefficients (95% CI) for repeated administration (n = 126) were 0.74 (0.61−0.83) for total physical activity, 0.72 (0.57−0.82) for walking, and 0.65 (0.51−0.78) for sitting time. Total physical activity and walking (MET-min·week-1) correlated with daily steps (Spearman r = .24 and r = .23, respectively, P < .05). Sitting time (min·week-1) correlated negatively with daily steps in women (r = −0.33; P < .05).

Conclusion:

Our French version of the IPAQ-L appears reliable to assess habitual physical activity and sedentary time in patients with T2DM, confirming previous data in nonclinical populations.

Restricted access

Paloma Flores-Barrantes, Greet Cardon, Iris Iglesia, Luis A. Moreno, Odysseas Androutsos, Yannis Manios, Jemina Kivelä, Jaana Lindström, Marieke De Craemer, and on behalf of the Feel4Diabetes Study Group

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), long considered an uncommon and unperceived disease, is nowadays an important international public health problem and one of the major health challenges of the 21st century. 1 It can even be considered, along with obesity, as the greatest chronic disease epidemic

Restricted access

Nele Huys, Vicky Van Stappen, Samyah Shadid, Marieke De Craemer, Odysseas Androutsos, Jaana Lindström, Konstantinos Makrilakis, Maria S. de Sabata, Luis Moreno, Pilar De Miguel-Etayo, Violeta Iotova, Imre Rurik, Yannis Manios, Greet Cardon, and on behalf of the Feel4Diabetes-Study Group

The prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide because of the increase in age-specific prevalence of diabetes, among other factors. This could be attributed to the increase of the main modifiable risk factors (ie, overweight/obesity and physical inactivity). 1 Ogurtsova et al 2

Full access

Melanie A. Mason, Anne C. Russ, Ryan T. Tierney, and Jamie L. Mansell

Clinical Scenario According to the 2020 National Diabetes Statistics Report, approximately 187,000 children and adolescents in the United States have Type 1 diabetes. 1 In Type 1 diabetes, an individual’s autoimmune system destroys the insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, which reside in the

Restricted access

Paul A. McAuley, Haiying Chen, Duck-chul Lee, Enrique Garcia Artero, David A. Bluemke, and Gregory L. Burke

Background:

The influence of higher physical activity on the relationship between adiposity and cardiometabolic risk is not completely understood.

Methods:

Between 2000–2002, data were collected on 6795 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. Self-reported intentional physical activity in the lowest quartile (0–105 MET-minutes/week) was categorized as inactive and the upper three quartiles (123–37,260 MET-minutes/week) as active. Associations of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference categories, stratified by physical activity status (inactive or active) with cardiometabolic risk factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, upper quartile of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR] for population, and impaired fasting glucose or diabetes) were assessed using logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and current smoking.

Results:

Among obese participants, those who were physically active had reduced odds of insulin resistance (47% lower; P < .001) and impaired fasting glucose/diabetes (23% lower; P = .04). These associations were weaker for central obesity. However, among participants with a normal waist circumference, those who were inactive were 63% more likely to have insulin resistance (OR [95% CI] 1.63 [1.24–2.15]) compared with the active reference group.

Conclusions:

Physical activity was inversely related to the cardiometabolic risk associated with obesity and central obesity.

Restricted access

D.S. Blaise Williams III, Denis Brunt, and Robert J. Tanenberg

The majority of plantar ulcers in the diabetic population occur in the forefoot. Peripheral neuropathy has been related to the occurrence of ulcers. Long-term diabetes results in the joints becoming passively stiffer. This static stiffness may translate to dynamic joint stiffness in the lower extremities during gait. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate differences in ankle and knee joint stiffness between diabetic individuals with and without peripheral neuropathy during gait. Diabetic subjects with and without peripheral neuropathy were compared. Subjects were monitored during normal walking with three-dimensional motion analysis and a force plate. Neuropathic subjects had higher ankle stiffness (0.236 N·m/ deg) during 65 to 80% of stance when compared with non-neuropathic subjects (−0.113 N·m/deg). Neuropathic subjects showed a different pattern in ankle stiffness compared with non-neuropathic subjects. Neuropathic subjects demonstrated a consistent level of ankle stiffness, whereas non-neuropathic subjects showed varying levels of stiffness. Neuropathic subjects demonstrated lower knee stiffness (0.015 N·m/deg) compared with non-neuropathic subjects (0.075 N·m/deg) during 50 to 65% of stance. The differences in patterns of ankle and knee joint stiffness between groups appear to be related to changes in timing of peak ankle dorsiflexion during stance, with the neuropathic group reaching peak dorsiflexion later than the non-neuropathic subjects. This may partially relate to the changes in plantar pressures beneath the metatarsal heads present in individuals with neuropathy.

Restricted access

Vera K. Tsenkova, Chioun Lee, and Jennifer Morozink Boylan

Diabetes is a significant problem in the United States and accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality. Currently, 9.3% have diabetes and 37% have milder forms of hyperglycemia such as prediabetes that typically transition to overt diabetes. 1 The economic costs of diabetes are staggering

Restricted access

Stefano Palermi, Anna M. Sacco, Immacolata Belviso, Nastasia Marino, Francesco Gambardella, Carlo Loiacono, and Felice Sirico

to decreased socialization, autonomy, and overall quality of life ( Salkeld et al., 2000 ). This public health issue is even more serious in specific subsets of patients with specific diseases, such as patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Indeed, these patients have a higher risk of falling

Restricted access

Rodrigo Sudatti Delevatti, Thais Reichert, Cláudia Gomes Bracht, Salime Donida Chedid Lisboa, Elisa Corrêa Marson, Rochelle Rocha Costa, Ana Carolina Kanitz, Vitória Bones, Ricardo Stein, and Luiz Fernando Martins Kruel

diabetes, 1 whereas overall physical activity and exercise training are part of diabetes treatment. 2 In order to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes, decreasing the sedentary behavior and increasing physical activity levels have been desired outcomes in diabetes management