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Samantha F. Ehrlich, Amanda J. Casteel, Scott E. Crouter, Paul R. Hibbing, Monique M. Hedderson, Susan D. Brown, Maren Galarce, Dawn P. Coe, David R. Bassett, and Assiamira Ferrara

. Calculation of the amount of time spent in activity of various intensities is then limited to periods of device wear. Historically, diaries have been used to assess wear time; participants record on/off times, and the logs also serve as a reminder to wear the device ( Lee & Shiroma, 2014 ). More recently

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Mike Sleap, Barbara Elliott, Martha Paisi, and Helen Reed

Background:

There are concerns about the future health of young people due to inactive lifestyles. However, evidence about their physical activity levels is not extensive, especially with regard to affluent young people. This study aimed to investigate whether young people from affluent backgrounds met public health recommendations for physical activity.

Methods:

Diary accounts of lifestyle activity were collected from 219 students ages 9 to 15 y attending a fee-paying school in England.

Results:

Pupils spent an average of 121 min per day participating in physical activities of at least moderate intensity, considerably more than public health recommendations of 60 min per day. However, almost a quarter of these young people engaged in less than 60 min of physical activity per day of at least moderate intensity.

Conclusions:

The picture to emerge was one of a balance between sedentary pursuits like television and homework and physical activities such as sport and active play.

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Elif Inan-Eroglu, Bo-Huei Huang, Leah Shepherd, Natalie Pearson, Annemarie Koster, Peter Palm, Peter A. Cistulli, Mark Hamer, and Emmanuel Stamatakis

monitoring, and large resource demands due to its specialized equipment ( Van de Water, Holmes, & Hurley, 2011 ). Diaries are common low-cost/low-tech alternatives for sleep monitoring in population research. However, diary-based methods could be burdensome for participants and subject to recall bias

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Fleur Pawsey, Jennifer Hoi Ki Wong, Göran Kenttä, and Katharina Näswall

, daytime mindfulness is positively related to mood and energy ratings the following day via the mechanisms of (a) reduced evening rumination and (b) improved sleep quality. The purpose of the current research was to test the two hypotheses, and we did this by using a diary design, with participants

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Faye F. Didymus and David Fletcher

This study investigated sport performers’ coping strategies in response to organizational stressors, examined the utility of Skinner, Edge, Altman, and Sherwood’s (2003) categorization of coping within a sport context, determined the short-term perceived effectiveness of the coping strategies used, and explored appraisal-coping associations. Thirteen national standard swimmers completed semistructured, interval-contingent diaries every day for 28 days. Results revealed 78 coping strategies, which supported 10 of Skinner et al.’s (2003) families of coping. Twenty-four different combinations of coping families were identified. The perceived most effective coping family used in isolation was self-reliance and in combination was escape and negotiation. Stressful appraisals were associated with varied coping strategies. The results highlight the complexity of coping and point to the importance of appraisal-coping associations. Skinner et al.’s (2003) categorization of coping provides a promising conceptual framework for the development of coping research in sport.

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Lena Busch, Till Utesch, Paul-Christian Bürkner, and Bernd Strauss

awareness. Methods Trial Design In this randomly controlled trial (RCT) study, two randomized experimental groups were implemented. Participants tracked their physical activity via a wearable fitness app device and a daily diary questionnaire. Participants allocated to the experimental target (ET) group had

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Matthew Pearce, David H. Saunders, Peter Allison, and Anthony P. Turner

resolution, but fail to capture contextual detail, whereas self-report diaries permit detailed descriptions of physical activity but are cognitively demanding and burdensome for the participant. 16 These difficulties are exacerbated in unstructured activities, which are typically sporadic and unmemorable

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Audie A. Atienza, Brian Oliveira, B.J. Fogg, and Abby C. King

This pilot investigation used portable electronic diaries to assess the physical activity and other health behaviors of 20 adults age 50+ (mean age = 61 years). Study aims were to examine whether computerized cognitive-behavioral strategies could increase adherence to the assessments, the acceptability of electronic diaries to assess everyday health, and the relationship between computerized physical activity assessments with a standardized physical activity measure. Although approximately two thirds of participants had never used an electronic diary, results indicated that a large majority (83%) reported enjoying the use of the electronic diaries, and most (72%) reported enjoying answering all of the health questions. The cognitive-behavioral strategies employed did not enhance assessment adherence, but electronic-diary-based activity levels corresponded more strongly with the poststudy standardized activity measure than the baseline standardized measure, providing evidence of temporal convergence. Findings suggest that the use of portable electronic technology in physical activity assessment of middle-aged and older adults deserves further study.

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Yoshimi Fukuoka, Emiko Kamitani, Kathleen Dracup, and So Son Jong

Objectives:

The purposes of this study were 1) to determine compliance with a pedometer and mobile phone-based physical activity diary, and 2) to assess concordance between self-reported daily steps recorded and transmitted by a mobile phone and pedometer-measured daily steps in sedentary women.

Methods:

In this 3-week pilot clinical study, 41 sedentary women who met all inclusion criteria were recruited from local communities. We asked the participants to wear a pedometer every day and to report their daily steps using a mobile phone diary each night before retiring. In the first week, women were asked to monitor their daily steps (baseline steps). In the second and third weeks, they were asked to increase their steps by 20% from the previous week. Although the pedometer can automatically store the most recent 41 days’ performance, the participants were not informed of this function of the pedometer.

Results:

Overall compliance was 93.8% with pedometer use and 88.3% with the mobile phone physical activity diary. Bland Altman plots showed that the agreement between self-reported daily steps by mobile phone diary and pedometer-recorded daily steps from week 1 to week 3 was high.

Conclusion:

The combination of a pedometer and a mobile phone diary may enhance the quality of self-reported data in clinical studies.

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Matthew Sitch and Melissa Day

Making weight refers to the process of reducing body weight to compete in weight-categorized sports. The current study explored judo athletes’ psychological experiences of making weight. Six international standard judo athletes participated for the length of time they required to make weight. An unstructured diary was used to collect data daily, supported by a follow-up interview. Data were analyzed using a holistic content analysis. Emergent themes included initiating the making weight process, competing demands of dual roles, temptation, impacts of restricted nutrition, and the desire for social support. Athlete stories provided rich descriptions of their experiences, revealing the extent to which difficulties were concealed and the process of making weight was normalized. Their accounts highlight the challenges associated with social support but the value of emotional disclosure. Future research should explore the potential uses of diaries as a form of disclosure.