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Nanci S. Guest and Susan I. Barr

High levels of cognitive dietary restraint (CDR) have been associated with subclinical menstrual cycle irregularities and increased cortisol levels, both of which can affect bone mineral density (BMD). Low BMD has been implicated in stress fracture risk. We assessed CDR in female runners (≥ 20 km/wk) with a recent stress fracture (SF) and with no stress fracture history (NSF). A sample of 79 runners (n = 38 SF, 29 ± 5 y; n = 41 NSF, 29 ± 6 y) completed a 3-d food record and questionnaire assessing physical activity, menstrual cycle history, and perceived stress. SF and NSF runners had similar body mass index (21.2 ± 1.8 vs. 22.0 ± 2.5 kg/m2), physical activity (35.7 ± 13.5 vs. 33.4 ± 1.34 km/wk), perceived stress, and dietary intakes. CDR, however, was higher in SF runners (11.0 ± 5.4 vs. 8.4 ± 4.3, P < 0.05). Subclinical menstrual cycle disturbances and increased cortisol levels that are associated with high CDR, might in turn contribute to lowered BMD and increased stress fracture risk.

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Louise M. Burke, Bronwen Lundy, Ida L. Fahrenholtz and Anna K. Melin

metabolism are often found to have higher values for dietary restraint or drive for thinness on eating behavior questionnaires than their more regular counterparts ( Gibbs et al., 2011 , 2013b ; Melin et al., 2016 ). It has been suggested that psychosocial stress acts synergistically to exacerbate the

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Justine Chatterton, Trent A. Petrie, Keke L. Schuler and Camilo Ruggero

physical attractiveness) and dietary restraint (i.e., self-reported intentions to restrict caloric intake), to predict bulimic symptomatology ( Petrie & Greenleaf, 2012b ). To date, however, research conducted on male athletes has lagged far behind that of female athletes, relying on relatively small

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Victoria Anne Catenacci, Lorraine Odgen, Suzanne Phelan, J. Graham Thomas, James Hill, Rena R. Wing and Holly Wyatt

Background:

The National Weight Control Registry (NWCR) was established to examine characteristics of successful weight loss maintainers. This study compares the diet and behavioral characteristics and weight regain trajectories of NWCR members with differing physical activity (PA) levels at baseline.

Methods:

Participants (n = 3591) were divided into 4 levels of self-reported PA at registry entry (< 1000, 1000 to < 2250, 2250 to < 3500, and ≥ 3500 kcals/week). We compared self-reported energy intake (EI), macronutrient composition, eating behaviors (dietary restraint, hunger, and disinhibition), weight loss maintenance strategies, and 3 year weight regain between these 4 activity groups.

Results:

Those with the highest PA at registry entry had lost the most weight, and reported lower fat intake, more dietary restraint, and greater reliance on several specific dietary strategies to maintain weight loss. Those in the lowest PA category maintained weight loss despite low levels of PA and without greater reliance on dietary strategies. There were no differences in odds of weight regain at year 3 between PA groups.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that there is not a “one size fits all strategy” for successful weight loss maintenance and that weight loss maintenance may require the use of more strategies by some individuals than others.

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Mary Yannakoulia, Marietta Sitara and Antonia-Leda Matalas

The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention program that combined nutrition education and prevention of disordered eating in a group of female professional dance students. Thirty-two dancers, aged 19-25 years, took part in the program. Evaluation was done by a series of questionnaires that participants were asked to complete on 3 occasions. Assessments of body composition and dietary intake were also performed. Significant improvements in nutrition knowledge as well as a decrease in abnormal eating behavior and dietary restraint were observed at post intervention. At 6-month follow-up, the positive effects were maintained and further benefits were recorded; only nutrition knowledge showed a minor decline. Participants who were at higher risk for adopting abnormal eating behavior benefited the most from the program. These findings encourage the implementation of intervention programs in groups of young women that experience particular pressures for controlling body weight.

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Christy Greenleaf, Trent Petrie, Justine Reel and Jennifer Carter

Petrie and Greenleaf (2007) presented a psychosocial model of disordered eating for female athletes. Based upon the 2007 model, the present study examined four key psychosocial variables: internalization, body dissatisfaction, restrained eating, and negative affect, as predictors of bulimic symptoms among NCAA Division I female athletes. Two hundred four women (N = 204) participated and were drawn from three different universities and competed in 17 different varsity sports. After controlling for the effects of body mass and social desirability, hierarchical regression analysis showed that the psychosocial variables explained 42% of the variance in bulimic symptoms. In the full model, higher levels of body dissatisfaction, more dietary restraint, and stronger feelings of guilt were associated with bulimic symptomatology. Internalization of the sociocultural ideal as well as feelings of fear, hostility, or sadness were unrelated.

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Carlin M. Anderson, Trent A. Petrie and Craig S. Neumann

In this study, we tested Petrie and Greenleaf’s (2007) model of bulimic symptoms in two independent samples of female collegiate swimmers/divers and gymnasts. Structural equation modeling revealed support for the model, although it also suggested additional pathways. Specifically, general societal pressures regarding weight and body were related to the internalization of those ideals and, subsequently, to increases in body dissatisfaction. Pressures from the sport environment regarding weight and appearance were associated with more body dissatisfaction and more restrictive eating. Body dissatisfaction was related to more feelings of sadness, anger, and fear among the athletes. Negative affect, body dissatisfaction, and dietary restraint were related directly to bulimic symptoms, accounting for 55-58% of its variance. These results suggest that general sociocultural pressures are influential, but weight and appearance pressures in the sport environment may be even more pervasive and negative for female athletes.

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Kayla W. Carrigan, Trent A. Petrie and Carlin M. Anderson

Female athletes have been identified as a subpopulation at heightened risk for disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, particularly due to weight pressures in their environment. Using a sample of 414 NCAA Division-I female collegiate athletes, we examined the relations of required team weigh-ins or self-weighing on disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. Through a series of multivariate analyses, we determined that team weighs were significantly unrelated to all outcome measures. Self-weighing, however, differentiated the athletes’ scores on internalization, body satisfaction, dietary restraint, negative affect, and bulimic symptomatology; athletes who self-weighed three or more times a week reported significantly higher levels of pathology across all measures. Mandatory team-conducted weigh-ins appear to not be a salient pressure for female gymnasts and swimmer/divers, although the frequency of their self-weighing may represent a level of self-monitoring that is associated with greater endorsement of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors.

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K. Jason Crandall and Patricia A. Eisenman

Binge eating disorder (BED) is a relatively new eating disorder that involves recurrent binge eating without compensatory purging behaviors such as using laxatives, excessive physical activity, and/or dietary restraint. Individuals diagnosed with BED exhibit both psychological and physiological problems that are distinct from bulimia nervosa and non-BED obese individuals. There has been little to no research examining the effects of physical activity on BED treatment. Since current BED treatment strategies have been less than successful, physical activity may be a positive addition to BED treatment. Therefore the objectives of this paper are 1) to raise the awareness of exercise professionals as to. the existence of BED, 2) explore the mechanisms that might support the utilization of physical activity as an adjunct treatment strategy for BED and 3) to prompt more interest among researchers and practitioners relative to using physical activity interventions with BED clients.

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Karen J. Reading, Linda J. McCargar and Vicki J. Harber

Menstrual abnormalities are associated with negative energy balance and reduced energy expenditure (REE). To examine this relationship in elite adolescent aesthetic athletes, 3 groups of females (aged 15-18 years) were studied: 10 oligo/amenorrheic athletes (OA), 11 eumenorrheic athletes (EA), and 8 non-athlete controls (C). Components of energy balance, body composition, dietary restraint, pubertal maturation, and luteal phase salivary progesterone were assessed in all groups. Both groups of athletes had a later age of menarche and lowerpubertal development score compared to the non-athletes (p < .05). With the exception of salivary progesterone (ng/ml; OA = 0.15±0.01 <EA = 0.29± 0.1 and C = 0.30 ± 0.13, /p = .007), there were no differences between the athlete groups. Energy balance (kcal/d) in the OA group was lower (−290 ± 677) compared to either EA (−5±461) or C (179 ± 592) but did not reach significance (p = .24). Dietary energy intake and absolute REE (kcal/d) were not different among groups, despite detectable differences in reproductive status, and thus could not be attributed to differences in energy balance or REE.