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Zachary McCarver, Shelby Anderson, Justine Vosloo and Sebastian Harenberg

Association (NCAA), over 45% of student-athletes identified as a race/ethnicity other than White ( NCAA, 2018 ). However, the importance of diversity has traditionally been ignored in sport and exercise psychology (SEP), both in research and in practice. Only 10.5% of abstracts submitted to the AASP annual

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Jörg Vianden and Elizabeth A. Gregg

racism, ageism, sexism, ableism, homophobia, and other forms of oppression on the college campus” on frequent basis ( Brooks, Harrison, Norris, & Norwood, 2013 , p. 146). To increase diversity, inclusion, and equity in institutions of higher education, it is critical to gain a deeper understanding of how

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Manuela Picariello and Pamela Angelle

Women are vastly underrepresented in leadership positions in sport organizations both in the United States and internationally (Burton, 2015; Knoppers & Anthonissen, 2008; Whisenant, 2008). The realm of sport is perceived as a gendered space in which the concept of masculinity maintains dominance. This concept may have an influence on the decision making related to the hiring of new staff. When the owner of a men’s professional basketball team decided to hire a new head coach for the upcoming season, he found himself facing many different challenges. He believes that if knowledge, skills, and abilities are the parameters to evaluate a coach, then gender should not be an issue (Chelladurai, 2005). The focus in this case includes (a) organizational fit in hiring, (b) leadership and gender, (c) considerations of diversity, and (d) organizational culture and operations in hiring. This case exemplifies the need to understand that hiring decisions in large organizations are complex and involve a delicate balance of stakeholder interests.

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Kyle A. Rich and Audrey R. Giles

This article examines the piloting of a cultural safety training module in the Canadian Red Cross’s (CRC’s) Water Safety Instructor Development Program. Thematic analysis of interviews with program participants and facilitators revealed two main themes: Inclusion is important and valued by instructors, and accommodation for cultural and ethnic diversity is difficult to achieve in aquatics settings. Doherty and Chelladurai’s (1999) framework was used to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the pilot module. In conclusion, the authors propose that cultural safety training for the instructors alone will not lead to the provision of culturally safe sport; rather, there needs to be a change in the overall organizational culture in which the CRC’s programs are offered if they are to succeed. These findings make three contributions to the literature. First, the authors bridge the existing bodies of literature on critical Whiteness theory and sport management literature that addresses the management of diversity. Second, the authors explore the novel application of cultural safety training for instructors of a sport program. Finally, the authors offer recommendations to enable the development of an organizational culture that is facilitative and supportive with respect to inclusion (i.e., is welcoming) and accommodation (i.e., is flexible and adaptable) of cultural and ethnic diversity in aquatics programming.

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Meg G. Hancock, Lindsey Darvin and Nefertiti A. Walker

perception of the barriers in terms of acknowledging that opportunities for women to advance do exist rather than focusing more singularly on questioning if women can advance ( Smith et al., 2012 ). The purpose of this examination was to advance a growing dialogue concerned with sport industry diversity

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Allyson C. Hartzell and Marlene A. Dixon

Diversity in organizations has distinct positive implications. Organizations with more female representation are more successful than those headed solely by men ( Adler, 2001 ; Catalyst, 2013 ; Desvaux, Devillard-Hoellinger, & Baumgarten, 2007 ; Wittenberg-Cox, 2010 ; Wittenberg-Cox, 2014 ). A

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George B. Cunningham

The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence, antecedents, and outcomes of diversity training in intercollegiate athletics. Data were collected from senior level administrators and aggregated to the department level for NCAA Division I (n = 239), Division II (n = 205), and Division III (n = 231) athletic departments. Only 53% of the athletic departments offered training. Logistic regression indicated that gender diversity, sexual orientation diversity, divisional affiliation, and the presence of a proactive diversity culture were all predictive of whether the department offered training. Additional analysis indicated that sensitivity to individual needs and understanding different cultures were the topics most covered in the training. Finally, the motivation for training (either compliance- or effectiveness-based) and the degree to which the training was systematically integrated were predictive of transfer of training, with the latter variable holding the strongest association. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

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Alison J. Doherty and Packianathan Chelladurai

The article focuses on the management and impact of cultural diversity in sport organizations. It is proposed that the potentially constructive or destructive impact of cultural diversity is a function of the management of that diversity, which is ultimately a reflection of organizational culture, or “how things are done around here.” Organizational culture is described along a continuum of valuing similarity and diversity in the organization. It is argued that the benefits of cultural diversity (e.g., creativity, challenge, constructive conflict) will be realized when an organizational culture of diversity underlies the management of that diversity. These benefits are heightened when the situation dictates a high degree of task interdependence and complexity. Implications for increasing cultural diversity and developing an organizational culture that values that diversity, as a social responsibility and a contributing force to organizational performance, are discussed.

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Dana D. Brooks, Louis Harrison Jr., Michael Norris and Dawn Norwood

The primary purpose of this article is to engage in a dialogue regarding why faculty, students, and administrators should care about diversity and inclusion in kinesiology. Recent American population growth trends data clearly reveals an increase in ethnic minority populations, particularly Hispanics. American public schools and colleges are experiencing greater ethnic diversity, leading to increased diversity within our classrooms. A review of the literature quickly reveals a lack of clarity in defining the terms diversity and inclusion. Throughout the article we define these terms and at the same time identify barriers (on and off campus) to promoting and ensuring a diverse learning environment. Strong arguments are presented supporting the value of diversity within the academy, especially in kinesiology. The value of diversity in kinesiology is refected in scholarly publications, conference programming, awards recognition activities, and in the recruitment and retention of a diverse faculty and student population.

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NiCole R. Keith and Jared A. Russell

This article describes the characteristics of diversity within academia and professional organizations in general and specifically within Kinesiology departments and Kinesiology-related organizations. While other types of diversity exist, this article refers to diversity in terms of race/ethnicity, gender, age, physical capability, socioeconomic background, and/or sexual orientation. Two Kinesiology departments, within the context of their universities, in two different regions of the United States are presented as models of best practice to improve institutional diversity. Also presented are one detailed example and several general examples of methods by which Kinesiology-related professional organizations have developed intentional strategies to improve diversity in membership and leadership. Presented models could, at least in part, be used by administrators and leaders to improve diversity within academic institutions and professional organizations.