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Sarah J. Wherry, Cheryl Der Ananian and Pamela D. Swan

Background: This study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based exercise intervention using the Wii Fit Plus®. Methods: A randomized, controlled trial of 24 women (age 53.6 [5.4] y) was used to assess compliance and changes in balance over 12 weeks. Balance was measured via the Berg Balance Scale and Frailty and Injuries: Cooperative Studies of Intervention Techniques-4 Scale at baseline and week 6 and week 12. Participant compliance to the intervention was captured via paper logs and the electronic record collected by the Wii Fit Plus®. Results: Participants in the intervention group were 95% compliant based on electronic records. There were no significant differences between groups for total score on either balance scale. There was a significant group × time interaction in favor of the intervention for maximum velocity y (P < .05), average velocity (P < .05), and was trending for maximum velocity x (P = .05) in the tandem step, eyes closed position. Conclusions: The results suggest that the Wii Fit Plus® is appropriate for home-based interventions in middle-aged women. Modest improvements in balance indicate that this may be an effective means to improve or maintain balance in older women. More research is needed to determine compliance and benefits to reducing fall risk in durations exceeding 12 weeks.

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Trina Hinkley, Anna Timperio, Jo Salmon and Kylie Hesketh

Background:

Little is known about the associations of preschoolers’ health behaviors with their later psychosocial wellbeing. This study investigates the association of 3- to 5-year-old children’s physical activity and electronic media use with their later social-emotional skills (6-8 years).

Methods:

Data were collected in 2008–2009 and 2011–2012 for the Healthy Active Preschool and Primary Years (HAPPY) Study in metropolitan Melbourne. Participants were a random subsample (n = 108) of the 567 children at follow-up. Physical activity was objectively measured using ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers; electronic media use (television viewing, sedentary electronic games and active electronic games) was parent proxy-reported. Social and emotional skills were child-reported using the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory—Youth Version. Regression analyses controlled for sex, clustering by center of recruitment, and accelerometer wear time (for physical activity analyses).

Results:

Sedentary electronic games were positively associated with intrapersonal and stress management skills and total emotional quotient. Computer/internet use was inversely associated with interpersonal, and positively associated with stress management, skills.

Conclusions:

Findings suggest that physical activity is not associated with children’s psychosocial health while some types of electronic media use are. Future research should investigate the contexts in which preschoolers participate in these behaviors and potential causal mechanisms of associations.

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Maarten Vansteenkiste, Athanasios Mouratidis, Thomas van Riet and Willy Lens

In the current study we aimed to examine the antecedents and outcomes associated with the variability in competitive volleyball players’ (N = 67; M age = 19.45; SD = 5.13) situational achievement goal pursuit and its underlying autonomous and controlling reasons. Players were followed during six consecutive games and data were analyzed through multilevel modeling. Players’ dominant contextual goal pursuit reported at the onset of the study related to their situational (i.e., game-specific) goal pursuit. Further, variation in game-to-game mastery-approach goal pursuit, as compared with the pursuit of other achievement goals, related to variation in prosocial behavior. Finally, autonomous reasons underlying situational mastery-approach goal pursuit related positively to games-specific prosocial behavior, enjoyment, and performance satisfaction. The discussion emphasizes the necessity to study players’ game-to-game motivational dynamics and the reasons underlying players’ achievement goal pursuit.

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Paul E. Yeatts, Ronald Davis, Jun Oh and Gwang-Yon Hwang

Participation in physical activity has been shown to improve components of psychological well-being (i.e., affect). Programs such as the Warrior Games have been designed to promote physical activity in wounded military personnel. However, sport competition typically yields a winner and a loser (i.e., game outcome). The experience of a win or a loss may affect how wounded athletes respond to game outcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the affective changes (positive affect, negative affect, tranquility, and fatigue) according to game outcome in a sample of wounded military wheelchair basketball players participating in a weekend tournament. The results indicated that the participants who experienced a win reported significantly higher positive affect and tranquility and significantly lower negative affect than those experiencing a loss. These findings have important implications for wounded veteran athletes, as well as coaches and administrative personnel.

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Christiana M.T. van Loo, Anthony D. Okely, Marijka Batterham, Tina Hinkley, Ulf Ekelund, Soren Brage, John J. Reilly, Gregory E. Peoples, Rachel Jones, Xanne Janssen and Dylan P. Cliff

Background:

To validate the activPAL3 algorithm for predicting metabolic equivalents (TAMETs) and classifying MVPA in 5- to 12-year-old children.

Methods:

Fifty-seven children (9.2 ± 2.3y, 49.1% boys) completed 14 activities including sedentary behaviors (SB), light (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (MVPA). Indirect calorimetry (IC) was used as the criterion measure. Analyses included equivalence testing, Bland-Altman procedures and area under the receiver operating curve (ROC-AUC).

Results:

At the group level, TAMETs were significantly equivalent to IC for handheld e-game, writing/coloring, and standing class activity (P < .05). Overall, TAMETs were overestimated for SB (7.9 ± 6.7%) and LPA (1.9 ± 20.2%) and underestimated for MVPA (27.7 ± 26.6%); however, classification accuracy of MVPA was good (ROC-AUC = 0.86). Limits of agreement were wide for all activities, indicating large individual error (SB: −27.6% to 44.7%; LPA: −47.1% to 51.0%; MVPA: −88.8% to 33.9%).

Conclusions:

TAMETs were accurate for some SB and standing, but were overestimated for overall SB and LPA, and underestimated for MVPA. Accuracy for classifying MVPA was, however, acceptable.

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Grégoire Bosselut, Jean-Philippe Heuzé, Mark A. Eys, Paul Fontayne and Philippe Sarrazin

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between athletes’ perceptions of role ambiguity and two theoretically derived dimensions of coaching competency (i.e., game strategy and technique competencies). A total of 243 players from 26 teams representing various interdependent sports completed French versions of the Role Ambiguity Scale and the Coaching Competency Scale. Multilevel analyses supported the existence of relationships between the four dimensions of role ambiguity and the two dimensions of coaching competency at both individual and team levels. When the levels were considered jointly, athletes perceiving greater ambiguity in their role in both offensive and defensive contexts were more critical of their coach’s capacities to lead their team during competitions and to diagnose or formulate instructions during training sessions. The results also indicated that the dimension of scope of responsibilities was the main contributor to the relationship with coaching competency at an individual level, whereas role evaluation was the main contributor to this relationship at a group level. Findings are discussed in relation to the role episode model, the role ambiguity dimensions involved in the relationships according to the level of analysis considered, and the salience of ambiguity perceptions in the offensive context.

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Alexander L. Curry and Tiara Good

, around the games themselves (i.e., game updates). The business frame and its underlying themes allow the reporter to connect the reader deeply with the baseball conversation. Within the business frame, the theme of player updates appeared most often, and salaries, trades, and injuries were significant

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Christiana Schallhorn and Jessica Kunert

, Sky , and tabloid newspaper BILD , and also on www.esports.com and several Twitch channels, the latter two being popular websites for e-gaming and streaming. Thus, the Bundesliga Home Challenge can be regarded as innovative insofar that it normalized the presence of eSports players almost in passing

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Jordan L. Fox, Robert Stanton, Charli Sargent, Cody J. O’Grady and Aaron T. Scanlan

:10.1519/JSC.0000000000002291 30540282 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002291 16. Gómez MA , Lorenzo A , Sampaio J , Ibáñez JS , Ortega E . Game-related statistics that discriminated winning and losing teams from the Spanish men’s professional basketball teams . Coll Antropol . 2008 ; 32 : 451

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Paul Kinnerk, Stephen Harvey, Philip Kearney, Ciaran MacDonncha and Mark Lyons

.e., non-prescriptive activities deemed relevant to game-play where players are making decisions; Ford, Yates, & Williams, 2010 ; Hall et al., 2016 ; Low, Williams, McRobert, & Ford, 2013 ). GBA pedagogy advocates the predominant use of Playing Form (i.e., game-related) activity within coaching sessions while a traditional