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Kayla W. Carrigan, Trent A. Petrie and Carlin M. Anderson

Female athletes have been identified as a subpopulation at heightened risk for disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, particularly due to weight pressures in their environment. Using a sample of 414 NCAA Division-I female collegiate athletes, we examined the relations of required team weigh-ins or self-weighing on disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. Through a series of multivariate analyses, we determined that team weighs were significantly unrelated to all outcome measures. Self-weighing, however, differentiated the athletes’ scores on internalization, body satisfaction, dietary restraint, negative affect, and bulimic symptomatology; athletes who self-weighed three or more times a week reported significantly higher levels of pathology across all measures. Mandatory team-conducted weigh-ins appear to not be a salient pressure for female gymnasts and swimmer/divers, although the frequency of their self-weighing may represent a level of self-monitoring that is associated with greater endorsement of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors.

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Jenna C. Gibbs, Nancy I. Williams, Jennifer L. Scheid, Rebecca J. Toombs and Mary Jane De Souza

A high drive-for-thinness (DT) score obtained from the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 is associated with surrogate markers of energy deficiency in exercising women. The purposes of this study were to confirm the association between DT and energy deficiency in a larger population of exercising women that was previously published and to compare the distribution of menstrual status in exercising women when categorized as high vs. normal DT. A high DT was defined as a score ≥7, corresponding to the 75th percentile for college-age women. Exercising women age 22.9 ± 4.3 yr with a BMI of 21.2±2.2 kg/m2 were retrospectively grouped as high DT (n = 27) or normal DT (n = 90) to compare psychometric, energetic, and reproductive characteristics. Chi-square analyses were performed to compare the distribution of menstrual disturbances between groups. Measures of resting energy expenditure (REE) (4,949 ± 494 kJ/day vs. 5,406 ± 560 kJ/day, p < .001) and adjusted REE (123 ± 16 kJ/LBM vs. 130 ± 9 kJ/LBM, p = .027) were suppressed in exercising women with high DT vs. normal DT, respectively. Ratio of measured REE to predicted REE (pREE) in the high-DT group was 0.85 ± 0.10, meeting the authors’ operational definition for an energy deficiency (REE:pREE <0.90). A greater prevalence of severe menstrual disturbances such as amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea was observed in the high-DT group (χ2 = 9.3, p = .003) than in the normal-DT group. The current study confirms the association between a high DT score and energy deficiency in exercising women and demonstrates a greater prevalence of severe menstrual disturbances in exercising women with high DT.

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Lindsay E. Kipp, Nicole D. Bolter and Alison Phillips Reichter

have been demonstrated with 8- to 15-year-olds (eg,  7 , 9 ). Disordered Eating Eating attitudes and behaviors were assessed with the dieting subscale (7 items) of the Children’s Eating Attitude Test ( 29 ). Example items include “I feel very guilty after eating” and “I have been dieting.” Responses

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Pooja Somasundaram and Alexandra M. Burgess

presentation of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors among this understudied group may facilitate the development of prevention and intervention programs targeting the large number of amateur level female athletes. Perfectionism and Disordered Eating Symptomology In understanding the presentation of

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Sasha Gorrell and Drew A. Anderson

-report questionnaire that assesses disordered eating attitudes and behaviors over the previous 28 days. Responses on 28 items are on a 7- point scale, which are anchored by 0 ( no days ) and 6 ( every day ), and higher scores reflect greater eating-related pathology. The measure provides a Global score and four

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Justine Chatterton, Trent A. Petrie, Keke L. Schuler and Camilo Ruggero

A Test of an Etiological Model: Disordered Eating in Male Collegiate Athletes Male athletes are at risk for developing eating disorders (ED) as well as disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, such as bulimic symptomatology, due to general sociocultural ideals about body and appearance, and sport

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rhetoric of participation and inclusivity. Teammate influences on the eating attitudes and behaviors of female athletes Scott, C. L., Haycraft, E., and Plateau, C. R. School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, UK Prevalence rates for disordered eating and compulsive exercise

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Justine J. Reel, Leslie Podlog, Lindsey Hamilton, Lindsey Greviskes, Dana K. Voelker and Cara Gray

eating attitudes and behaviors in female professional dancers. Qualitative interviews were conducted to gain a deep, complex representation of the potential intersection between injury and disordered eating from the voices of dancers immersed in this environment. Similar to Voelker and Reel’s ( 2015

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Tanya McGuane, Stephen Shannon, Lee-Ann Sharp, Martin Dempster and Gavin Breslin

.I. , Terry , P.C. , & Chatzisarantis , N.L.D. ( 2003 ). Weight loss, mood responses, eating attitudes and behavior regulation among professional jockeys . Journal of Sports Sciences, 21 , 265 – 266 . Chatterton , J.M. , & Petrie , T.A. ( 2013 ). Prevalence of disordered eating and pathogenic

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Ben Desbrow, Nicholas A. Burd, Mark Tarnopolsky, Daniel R. Moore and Kirsty J. Elliott-Sale

healthy physical self-image ( Ekeland et al., 2005 ). However, increased rates of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors are evident in sports that emphasize leanness for optimal performance ( Torstveit et al., 2008 ). It is prudent to suggest that many adolescent athletes will require the knowledge