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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Cheri A. Levinson

Eating disorders (EDs) are serious illnesses with the highest mortality rate among all psychiatric disorders ( Harris & Barraclough, 1998 ). The prevalence of EDs has been found to be higher in athletes than non-athletes: non-athletes hold a lifetime prevalence rate of up to 4.6% ( Sundgot

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Cheri A. Levinson

Eating disorders (EDs) are serious and life impairing illnesses ( Harris & Barraclough, 1998 ) and are present in approximately 4.6% of the population ( Sundgot-Borgen & Torstveit, 2004 ). Some studies have found that EDs are even more common among athletes, with rates as high as 13.5% ( Sundgot

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Taylor K. Wise

ways people with disordered eating (DE) attempt to control their diet and weight ( Danner, Sternheim, & Evers, 2014 ). Although eating disorders (EDs) are found in and outside of athletic settings, collegiate athletes may be at a greater risk for developing DE behaviors than the general population

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Rachael E. Flatt and Craig Barr Taylor

Eating disorders (EDs) are common, particularly amongst female athletes, with some studies reporting upwards of 20–30% with clinical EDs and over a quarter at risk ( Bratland-Sanda & Sundgot-Borgen, 2013 ; Martinsen & Sundgot-Borgen, 2013 ). Despite findings that sport participation can have a

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Jenny H. Conviser, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Riley Nickols

It is estimated that 10 million women in the United States and 1 million men, of diverse gender, ethnicity, socio-cultural origin, socioeconomic status and age will meet diagnostic criteria for ED during their lifetime, including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder

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Dana K. Voelker and Justine J. Reel

The number of studies researching eating disorders and body image in sport has increased exponentially over several decades. This growing body of literature has positioned researchers to estimate the prevalence of eating disorder symptomatology in male and female athletes and examine the

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Fallon R. Mitchell, Sara Santarossa and Sarah J. Woodruff

). EDs are experienced by approximately 20 million women and 10 million men in America (National Eating Disorders Association [ NEDA], 2018 ). Of the numerous types of EDs, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder are the most common ( NEDA, 2018 ). Anorexia nervosa has a lifetime

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Jenny H. Conviser, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Riley Nickols

All eating disorders (EDs) pose risk of psychological, social, and life-threatening medical complications with serious compromise in overall quality of life ( Styer, Conviser, Washburn, & Aldridge, 2014 ). It is estimated that 10 million women and 1 million men in the United States, of diverse

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Jessyca N. Arthur-Cameselle and Molly Curcio

It is evident that competitive athletes experience clinical eating disorders (EDs). Out of the broader athlete population, research has demonstrated fairly consistently that female athletes are at higher risk for EDs and disordered eating than male athletes (e.g.,  Giel et al., 2016 ) and that

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Heather A. Hausenblas and Albert V. Carron

Research shows inconclusive results pertaining to the comparison of eating disorder indices between athletes and nonathletes and among different subgroups of athletes. The purpose of this study was to meta-analytically review the literature on (a) bulimia nervosa indices, (b) anorexia nervosa indices, and (c) drive for thinness (a cardinal feature of both anorexia and bulimia) in male and female athletes. Results of 92 studies with 560 effect sizes (ES) revealed small ESs (range: −.01 to .30) in relation to group membership characteristics. Results for female athletes revealed small ESs for bulimia and anorexia indices, suggesting that female athletes self-reported more bulimic and anorexic symptomatology than control groups; nonsignificant group differences were evidenced for drive for thinness. Results for male athletes revealed small ESs on all three indices, suggesting that male athletes self-reported more eating disorder symptomatology than control groups. Moderator variables that might contribute to understanding the results are examined, and future research directions are presented.