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Jay E. Maddock, Bill Reger-Nash, Katie Heinrich, Kevin M. Leyden and Thomas K. Bias

Background:

The U.S. Community Guide to Preventive Services strongly recommends changes in urban design, land use and accessibility to increase physical activity. To achieve these goals, policy change is often needed. This study assessed attitudes of decision makers in Hawaii to determine if physical activity related issues are among their priorities.

Methods:

State and county officials (n = 179) were mailed surveys. Respondents listed the three most important problems (open-ended) in Hawaii and rated the importance of 23 specified problems, of which six directly related to physical activity.

Results:

The survey was completed by 126 (70.4%) respondents. The most frequently mentioned categories for the open-ended questions were affordable housing, environment/sustainability, sprawl/traffic/population growth, and healthcare. Among the closed-ended physical activity related items, increasing traffic was ranked highest (43.9%) and fourth overall. Less than 12% of decision makers rated other physical activity issues as important.

Conclusions:

Future work is needed to increase the visibility and importance of physical activity related issues among policymakers.

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Katie M. Heinrich, Nancee N. Aki, Heidi Hansen-Smith, Mark Fenton and Jay Maddock

Background:

Policy changes were needed to reshape the built environment for active transportation.

Methods:

Using the social ecological model as a framework, the Healthy Hawaii Initiative worked with a contractor to develop a series of meetings, planning sessions, and workshops. Activities spanned 22 months between 2007 and 2009, and involved multiple stakeholders, including educational outreach for legislators and collaborative planning sessions with advocates.

Results:

Ultimately, with the help of the contractor to initiate the process, Complete Streets and Safe Routes to School (SRTS) legislation were introduced January 2009. Advocacy groups monitored bill progress, testified at hearings, and assisted in rewording the bills. The SRTS statute required the Department of Transportation (DOT) to administer the federal SRTS funds and the complete streets law tasked the state and county DOTs to adopt complete streets policies and review existing highway design standards and guidelines. Both bills were signed into law June 2009.

Conclusions:

Focusing efforts at multiple levels of the social ecological model involving champions and key stakeholders led to the successful passage of legislation supporting active transportation. Tracking policy implementation and evaluation over time will help determine actual impact on active transportation behaviors across Hawaii.

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Janet E. Fulton, David M. Buchner, Susan A. Carlson, Deborah Borbely, Kenneth M. Rose, Ann E. O’Connor, Janelle P. Gunn and Ruth Petersen

-disciplinary teams (eg, public health, transportation, planning, elected official) to develop an action plan for walkable communities through policy, systems, and environmental approaches. This can mean ensuring that sidewalks, paths, bicycle routes, or public transit are available, accessible, and connected with

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Cecilia Stenling and Michael Sam

health and medical care, local governments are in charge of practically all remaining public welfare services (including sport and recreation, culture, education, and elderly care). Regional and local governments are governed by elected officials (i.e., politicians, who may take the role of chair in a

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Haylee U. Mercado and John Grady

million per year, and the majority of local governments are typically responsible for these expenses ( Long, 2013 ). Elected officials, facility managers, and ordinary citizens share a vested interest in lowering the operation costs of their cities’ publicly subsidized PAFs. One potential means of

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Margaret McGladrey, Angela Carman, Christy Nuetzman and Nicole Peritore

hosting a Walkability Summit that guided community partners and elected officials on “walk audits” and active community design workshops facilitated by an expert consultant in public health, planning, and transportation whose services were made available through the CDC DPNAOs technical assistance

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Ellen Freiberger, Elisabeth Rydwik, Astrid Chorus, Erwin Tak, Christophe Delecluse, Federico Schena, Nina Waaler, Bob Laventure and Nico van Meeteren

practice be overcome and closed. As a result of proceedings from the Be Part Expert Meeting held in Rome, Italy, in October 2014, the Rome Statement was developed, based on the available knowledge and expertise of researchers, practitioners, and elected officials informed and concerned about physical

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René Revis Shingles

hold the collective feet of elected officials to the proverbial fire. Write letters, send e-mails, and/or make phone calls to government officials and policy makers. The social and political policies and laws that are enacted become health policies in practice. What can this mean for health care

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Jennifer Ann McGetrick, Krystyna Kongats, Kim D. Raine, Corinne Voyer and Candace I.J. Nykiforuk

increasing evidence that healthy public policies are an effective strategy to promote physical activity at the population level. 7 , 8 , 33 , 34 Ultimately, it is policy influencers who have the power to adopt these policies. Furthermore, in the case of both elected officials and leaders in large workplaces

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Kathryn Henne and Madeleine Pape

-Young (forthcoming) have identified similar rumors circulating among policy-makers and elected officials of the IAAF and IOC (see also Pieper, 2016 ). 13. More information is available via the Pacific Women website: http://www.pacificwomen.org/ 14. Examples include the head of UNIFEM Pacific (2005 to 2011), Fiji