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Xiaocai Shi, Mary K. Horn, Kris L. Osterberg, John R. Stofan,, Jeffrey J. Zachwieja, Craig A. Horswill, Dennis H. Passe and Robert Murray

This study investigated whether different beverage carbohydrate concentration and osmolality would provoke gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort during intermittent, high-intensity exercise. Thirty-six adult and adolescent athletes were tested on separate days in a double-blind, randomized trial of 6% and 8% carbohydrate-electrolytes (CHO-E) beverages during four 12-min quarters (Q) of circuit training that included intermittent sprints, lateral hops, shuttle runs, and vertical jumps. GI discomfort and fatigue surveys were completed before the first Q and immediately after each Q. All ratings of GI discomfort were modest throughout the study. The cumulative index for GI discomfort, however, was greater for the 8% CHO-E beverage than for the 6% CHO-E beverage at Q3 and Q4 (P < 0.05). Averaging across all 4 quarters, the 8% CHO-E treatment produced significantly higher mean ratings of stomach upset and side ache. In conclusion, higher CHO concentration and osmolality in an ingested beverage provokes stomach upset and side ache.

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João C. Dias, Melissa W. Roti, Amy C. Pumerantz, Greig Watson, Daniel A. Judelson, Douglas J. Casa and Lawrence E. Armstrong

Context:

Dieticians, physiologists, athletic trainers, and physicians have recommended refraining from caffeine intake when exercising because of possible fluid-electrolyte imbalances and dehydration.

Objective:

To assess how 16-hour rehydration is affected by caffeine ingestion.

Design:

Dose–response.

Setting:

Environmental chamber.

Participants:

59 college-age men.

Intervention:

Subjects consumed a chronic caffeine dose of 0 (placebo), 3, or 6 mg · kg−1 · day−1 and performed an exercise heat-tolerance test (EHT) consisting of 90 minutes of walking on a treadmill (5.6 km/h) in the heat (37.7 °C).

Outcome Measures:

Fluid-electrolyte measures.

Results:

There were no between-group differences immediately after and 16 hours after EHT in total plasma protein, hematocrit, urine osmolality, specific gravity, color, and volume. Body weights after EHT and the following day (16 hours) were not different between groups (P > .05).

Conclusion:

Hydration status 16 hours after EHT did not change with chronic caffeine ingestion.

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Paola Rodriguez-Giustiniani, Ian Rollo, Oliver C. Witard and Stuart D. R. Galloway

, the primary aim of this study was to provide further practical insight into the influence of ingesting a 12% carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) beverage on soccer skill performance and high-intensity running capacity in professional youth academy soccer players. We hypothesized that ingesting 250 ml of

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Yoram Epstein and Lawrence E. Armstrong

Body water and electrolyte balance are essential to optimal physiological function and health. During exercise, work, or high temperatures, a significant level of dehydration can develop, and the ratio of extracellular to intracellular fluid can change, despite an ample supply of water. Physical and cognitive performance are impaired at 1-2% dehydration, and the body can collapse when water loss approaches 7%. Because fluid needs and intakes vary, formulating one general guideline for fluid replacement is difficult. Knowing the amount of water lost in sweat may enable predicting fluid needs via mathematical models for industrial, athletic, and military scenarios. Sodium imbalance might result from excessive Na+ loss or from gross o verity dration. In most work or exercise lasting < 3-4 hr, the major concern is that fluid be available to prevent heat-related illnesses, which can be prevented if fluid and electrolyte losses are balanced with intake, using the recommendations presented.

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Fred Brouns, Wim Saris and Heinz Schneider

The addition of carbohydrate and sodium to sport drinks has been recommended to enhance fluid intake and absorption and to delay fatigue. Other electrolytes (E) which are lost through sweating are also commonly added. However, too many E may lead to increased serum E and osmolality levels, which may negatively influence thermoregulation, depress sweating, and cause gastrointestinal distress. On the other hand, drinking large amounts of plain water to compensate sweat loss may induce hyponatremia. Therefore, literature describing sweat E losses was examined in order to estimate average whole-body E loss and to determine an upper limit for replacement of E with sport drinks. Mean E loss was determined from 13 studies, with +1 SD resulting in a hypothetical range for E losses. Correction for net absorption resulted in an upper limit of electrolyte replacement. It is suggested that the E levels in sport rehydration drinks should not exceed the upper limit of the range given.

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Lawrence E. Armstrong

Recreational enthusiasts and athletes often are advised to abstain from consuming caffeinated beverages (CB). The dual purposes of this review are to (a) critique controlled investigations regarding the effects of caffeine on dehydration and exercise performance, and (b) ascertain whether abstaining from CB is scientifically and physiologically justifiable. The literature indicates that caffeine consumption stimulates a mild diuresis similar to water, but there is no evidence of a fluid-electrolyte imbalance that is detrimental to exercise performance or health. Investigations comparing caffeine (100-680 mg) to water or placebo seldom found a statistical difference in urine volume. In the 10 studies reviewed, consumption of a CB resulted in 0-84% retention of the initial volume ingested, whereas consumption of water resulted in 0-81% retention. Further, tolerance to caffeine reduces the likelihood that a detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalance will occur. The scientific literature suggests that athletes and recreational enthusiasts will not incur detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalances if they consume CB in moderation and eat a typical U.S. diet. Sedentary members of the general public should be at less risk than athletes because their fluid losses via sweating are smaller.

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Oded Bar-Or and Boguslaw Wilk

This article reviews studies, mostly from the authors' laboratory, on children's sweating rates and composition, voluntary drinking patterns during prolonged exercise in the heat, taste perception of beverages, and the importance of fluid flavor and composition in preventing voluntary dehydration. Subjects were children, exposed for 90 to 180 min to intermittent bouts of cycling (45-50% maximal O2 uptake) in a climatic chamber (mostly at 35 C°, 40-50% relative humidity). There were five main findings: When given unflavored water ad libitum, children dehydrated progressively and their core temperature increased faster than in adults. When offered drinks with various flavors, children preferred grape to other flavors. When given grape-flavored water during intermittent exercise in the heat, children voluntarily drank 44.5% more than with unflavored water. When given grape-flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte solution, they voluntarily drank 91% more than with unflavored water. Finally, such consumption of carbohydrate-electrolyte solution was sufficient to prevent voluntary dehydration during 180-min intermittent exercise in the heat.

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Ben Desbrow, Sally Anderson, Jennifer Barrett, Elissa Rao and Mark Hargreaves

The effects of a commercial sports drink on performance in high-intensity cycling was investigated. Nine well-trained subjects were asked to complete a set amount of work as fast as possible (time trial) following 24 h of dietary (subjects were provided with food, energy 57.4 ± 2.4 kcal/kg and carbohydrate 9.1 ± 0.4 g/kg) and exercise control. During exercise, subjects were provided with 14 mL/kg of either 6% carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) solution or carbohydrate-free placebo (P). Results showed that subjects’ performances did not greatly improve (time, 62:34 ± 6:44 min:sec (CHO-E) vs. 62:40 ± 5:35 min:sec (P); average power output, 283.0 ± 25.0 W (CHO-E) vs. 282.9 ± 29.3 W (P), P > 0.05) while consuming the sports drink. It was concluded that CHO-E consumption throughout a 1-h time trial, following a pre-exercise dietary regimen designed to optimize glucose availability, did not improve time or power output to a greater degree than P in well-trained cyclists.

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Alan J. McCubbin, Anyi Zhu, Stephanie K. Gaskell and Ricardo J.S. Costa

It is commonly accepted that during endurance exercise, adequate carbohydrate availability will optimize performance and will reduce the onset of fatigue, and that the use of carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions (CES) is encouraged ( Stellingwerff & Cox, 2014 ). Current carbohydrate ingestion

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Simone D. Henkin, Paulo L. Sehl and Flavia Meyer

Because swimmers train in an aquatic environment, they probably do not need to sweat as much as runners who train on land and, therefore, should not develop the same magnitude of sweating adaptations.

Purpose:

To compare sweat rate and electrolyte concentration in swimmers, runners and nonathletes.

Methods:

Ten swimmers (22.9 ± 3.1 years old), 10 runners (25 ± 2.9 y) and 10 nonathletes (26.5 ± 2.2 y) cycled in the heat (32°C and 40% relative humidity) for 30 min at similar intensity relative to their maximal cycle test. Sweat volume was calculated from the difference of their body mass before and after cycling, since they were not allowed to drink. Sweat was collected from the scapula using absorbent patch placed on the skin that was cleaned with distilled water. After cycling, the patch was transferred to syringe and the sample was obtained when squeezing it to a tube. Concentration of sodium ([Na+]), chloride ([Cl–]) and potassium ([K+]) were analyzed using an ion selector analyzer.

Results:

The sweat volume, in liters, of swimmers (0.9 ± 0.3) was lower (P < .05) than that of runners (1.5 ± 0.2) and similar to that of nonathletes (0.6 ± 0.2). [Na+] and [Cl-], in mmolL-1, of swimmers (65.4 ± 5.5 and 61.2 ± 81), and nonathletes (67.3 ± 8.5 and 58.3 ± 9.6) were higher (P < .05) than those of runners (45.2 ± 7.5 and 38.9 ± 8.3). [K+] was similar among groups.

Conclusions:

The lower sweat volume and higher sweat [Na+] and [Cl-] of swimmers, as compared with runners, indicate that training in the water does not cause the same magnitude of sweating adaptations.