Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 373 items for :

  • "electromyography" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Bret Contreras, Andrew D. Vigotsky, Brad J. Schoenfeld, Chris Beardsley and John Cronin

Bridging exercise variations are well researched and commonly employed for both rehabilitation and sport performance. However, resisted bridge exercise variations have not yet been compared in a controlled experimental study. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the differences in upper and lower gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, and vastus lateralis electromyography (EMG) amplitude for the barbell, band, and American hip thrust variations. Thirteen healthy female subjects (age = 28.9 y; height = 164.3 cm; body mass = 58.2 kg) familiar with the hip thrust performed 10 repetitions of their 10-repetition maximum of each variation in a counterbalanced and randomized order. The barbell hip thrust variation elicited statistically greater mean gluteus maximus EMG amplitude than the American and band hip thrusts, and statistically greater peak gluteus maximus EMG amplitude than the band hip thrust (P ≤ .05), but no other statistical differences were observed. It is recommended that resisted bridging exercise be prescribed according to the individual’s preferences and desired outcomes.

Restricted access

Bret Contreras, Andrew D. Vigotsky, Brad J. Schoenfeld, Chris Beardsley and John Cronin

Front, full, and parallel squats are some of the most popular squat variations. The purpose of this investigation was to compare mean and peak electromyography (EMG) amplitude of the upper gluteus maximus, lower gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, and vastus lateralis of front, full, and parallel squats. Thirteen healthy women (age = 28.9 ± 5.1 y; height = 164 ± 6.3 cm; body mass = 58.2 ± 6.4 kg) performed 10 repetitions of their estimated 10-repetition maximum of each respective variation. There were no statistical (P = .05) differences between full, front, and parallel squats in any of the tested muscles. Given these findings, it can be concluded that the front, full, or parallel squat can be performed for similar EMG amplitudes. However, given the results of previous research, it is recommended that individuals use a full range of motion when squatting, assuming full range can be safely achieved, to promote more favorable training adaptations. Furthermore, despite requiring lighter loads, the front squat may provide a similar training stimulus to the back squat.

Restricted access

David Phillips and Andrew Karduna

Electromyography (EMG) is a tool to determine the electrical behavior of muscles during a contraction. EMG can be measured simultaneously with an applied force to determine the relationship of EMG and an external load. This relationship may change depending on the rate of force development, 1

Restricted access

Damien Moore, Adam I. Semciw, Jodie McClelland, Henry Wajswelner and Tania Pizzari

-strengthening programs for people with lower-limb osteoarthritis. 23 – 25 The lack of research evaluating GMin function in exercise is likely due to the technical difficulty of accessing this muscle with intramuscular electromyography (EMG). 26 Some rehabilitation exercises for the GMin segments have been recently

Restricted access

Carlo J. De Luca

This lecture explores the various uses of surface electromyography in the field of biomechanics. Three groups of applications are considered: those involving the activation timing of muscles, the force/EMG signal relationship, and the use of the EMG signal as a fatigue index. Technical considerations for recording the EMG signal with maximal fidelity are reviewed, and a compendium of all known factors that affect the information contained in the EMG signal is presented. Questions are posed to guide the practitioner in the proper use of surface electromyography. Sixteen recommendations are made regarding the proper detection, analysis, and interpretation of the EMG signal and measured force. Sixteen outstanding problems that present the greatest challenges to the advancement of surface electromyography are put forward for consideration. Finally, a plea is made for arriving at an international agreement on procedures commonly used in electromyography and biomechanics.

Restricted access

Matthew S. Tenan, Andrew J. Tweedell and Courtney A. Haynes

The examination of muscle electromyography (EMG) burst timing in relation to external biomechanical events (eg, heel strike in gait) or in contrast to a secondary muscle (eg, vastus medialis oblique and vastus lateralis onset timing in patellofemoral pain) is used to understand how humans control

Restricted access

Damien Moore, Tania Pizzari, Jodie McClelland and Adam I. Semciw

fine-wire electromyography (EMG) for the anterior, middle, and posterior GMed segments during 6 common rehabilitation exercises. This may assist clinicians with prescribing targeted rehabilitation programs to prevent, manage, or treat segmental GMed dysfunction that is evident in pathology. 4 , 5

Restricted access

Stephen M. Suydam, Kurt Manal and Thomas S. Buchanan

Electromyography (EMG) is widely used for identifying muscle function in patients with neurologic and orthopaedic pathologies. Studies have obtained EMG during minimally dynamic activities such as walking, stair climbing, or single hop tasks. 1 – 3 EMG from movements with increased velocities, or

Restricted access

Benjamin S. Killen, Krista L. Zelizney and Xin Ye

, biceps femoris; CI, confidence interval; EMG, electromyography; Post, after intervention; Pre, before intervention; ROM, range of motion; SAFR, self-administered foam rolling intervention; SEMI, semitendinosus; SS, static stretching intervention. *Statistically significant difference ( P  ≤ .05

Restricted access

Billy Chun-Lung So, Calvin Hong-Nin Yuen, Ken Long-Hin Tung, Sheena Lam, Sammy Lan Cheng, Zina Wing-Lam Hung, Rainy Wai-Kwan Leung and Grace Pui-Yuk Szeto

recent childbirth • Consumption of any medication that prevents aerobic exercise or running in water Procedures This was a cross-sectional study designed to explore the differences in trunk muscle activation between HK-DWR, CC-DWR, and LW using healthy subjects. Electromyography (EMG) signals were