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Jamie Cleland

Elite sports events, whether it is a month-long football World Cup, a 16-day Olympic Games or a one-off event like the Super Bowl, have symbolic value to millions of people across the world. Indeed, it is their social, cultural, political, and economic importance that makes them a potential target

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Jan Haut, Freya Gassmann, Eike Emrich, Tim Meyer and Christian Pierdzioch

Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics. Apparently, Russia’s international image could hardly be worse. In this sense, the country’s huge investment in funding elite sports seems to have failed completely. However, according to Grix and Kramareva ( 2015 ), the Kremlin’s elite sport policy has forefronted domestic

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David Fletcher and Sheldon Hanton

This study extends recent research investigating organizational stress in elite sport. Fourteen international performers (7 men and 7 women) from a wide range of sports were interviewed with regard to potential sources of organizational stress. Consistent with Woodman and Hardy’s (2001a) theoretical framework of organizational stress in sport, four main categories were examined: environmental issues, personal issues, leadership issues, and team issues. The main environmental issues that emerged were selection, finances, training environment, accommodation, travel, and competition environment. The main personal issues were nutrition, injury, and goals and expectations. The main leadership issues were coaches and coaching styles. The main team issues were team atmosphere, support network, roles, and communication. The findings are discussed in relation to previous research and in terms of their implications for sport organizations and personnel working with elite performers.

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Kevin G. Thompson

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Andrew Parker and Andrew Manley

Traineeship within English professional football (soccer) has attracted much attention in recent years yet few studies have explored in any real depth the everyday workings of trainee footballing lives. This paper features the findings of two small-scale qualitative studies of football traineeship both of which were carried out at high profile English professional football clubs, one in 1993–94, the other in 2010–11. The paper uncovers the nuances of trainee experience in line with a series of theoretical assertions surrounding organizational discipline and control. It concludes by suggesting that while debate surrounding the design and delivery of traineeship within professional football has intensified over the past two decades, little appears to have changed with respect to the fundamental dynamics of organizational regimen.

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Tara K. Scanlan, David G. Russell, Larry A. Scanlan, Tatiana J. Klunchoo and Graig M. Chow

Following a thorough review of the current updated Sport Commitment Model, new candidate commitment sources for possible future inclusion in the model are presented. They were derived from data obtained using the Scanlan Collaborative Interview Method. Three elite New Zealand teams participated: amateur All Black rugby players, amateur Silver Fern netball players, and professional All Black rugby players. An inductive content analysis of these players’ open-ended descriptions of their sources of commitment identified four unique new candidate commitment sources: Desire to Excel, Team Tradition, Elite Team Membership, and Worthy of Team Membership. A detailed definition of each candidate source is included along with example quotes from participants. Using a mixed-methods approach, these candidate sources provide a basis for future investigations to test their viability and generalizability for possible expansion of the Sport Commitment Model.

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Stine Nylandsted Jensen, Andreas Ivarsson, Johan Fallby and Anne-Marie Elbe

This study investigated gambling among Danish and Swedish male elite football players. A cross-sectional design was used to survey 323 players (Mage = 22.08, SD = 5.15). The survey included a screening tool for gambling, as well as measures for depression and sport anxiety. The overall rate of players identified as at-risk gamblers was 16.1%. Linear regression analyses revealed that depression and sport anxiety significantly predicted gambling behaviors, and explained 2% and 6% of variance, respectively. The age of the players and the age at which they specialize did not moderate these relationships. Further research on gambling in football and its relation to mental disorders is needed.

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John J. Miller and John T. Wendt

On October 23, 2010 in the city of Fujairah, east of Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE), United States medal winning swimmer Fran Crippen failed to finish the Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) 10 Kilometer Marathon Swimming World Cup open water race. The conditions of the water and exterior temperature were relevant factors contributing to the death of Fran Crippen. A discussion of risk communication, as an integral part of the risk management process, describes how this tragedy could have been avoided. This case study will address how the proper authorities could have employed the risk communications to prevent this tragedy.

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Jens De Rycke, Veerle De Bosscher, Hiroaki Funahashi and Popi Sotiriadou

“Mapping Elite Sport’s potential Societal Impact” (MESSI) model ( De Rycke & De Bosscher, 2019 ; see Supplementary Figure S1 [available online]). It is essential to recognize that the aim of this study is to measure people’s perceptions, which are subjective and may not represent the truth. The study