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Jolan Kegelaers, Paul Wylleman, I. (Belle) N.A. van Bree, Francesco Wessels, and Raôul R.D. Oudejans

et al., 2016 ) within the context of elite sports. One of the recurring themes within the scientific literature reflects the crucial role of coaches in promoting athletes’ mental health (e.g.,  Bissett, Kroshus, & Hebard, 2020 ). However, comparatively little attention has been directed toward

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Jamie Cleland

Elite sports events, whether it is a month-long football World Cup, a 16-day Olympic Games or a one-off event like the Super Bowl, have symbolic value to millions of people across the world. Indeed, it is their social, cultural, political, and economic importance that makes them a potential target

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Niels B. Feddersen, Robert Morris, Louise K. Storm, Martin A. Littlewood, and David J. Richardson

time. Probing the underlying processes could help understand what drives and facilitates people’s and organizations’ behaviors in sport ( Girginov, 2010 ). A Longitudinal Study Into a Change of Culture in Elite Sports in the United Kingdom It is time to extend organizational culture research because

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Jan Haut, Freya Gassmann, Eike Emrich, Tim Meyer, and Christian Pierdzioch

Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics. Apparently, Russia’s international image could hardly be worse. In this sense, the country’s huge investment in funding elite sports seems to have failed completely. However, according to Grix and Kramareva ( 2015 ), the Kremlin’s elite sport policy has forefronted domestic

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Carolina Lundqvist

challenging phases or situations during an elite sports career (e.g., career transitions, injuries, life stress, performance setbacks or failures, post-Olympic experiences, stressors in the team or sports organization) and psychological symptoms linked to a depressive mood have been acknowledged (e

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Kevin G. Thompson

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David Fletcher and Sheldon Hanton

This study extends recent research investigating organizational stress in elite sport. Fourteen international performers (7 men and 7 women) from a wide range of sports were interviewed with regard to potential sources of organizational stress. Consistent with Woodman and Hardy’s (2001a) theoretical framework of organizational stress in sport, four main categories were examined: environmental issues, personal issues, leadership issues, and team issues. The main environmental issues that emerged were selection, finances, training environment, accommodation, travel, and competition environment. The main personal issues were nutrition, injury, and goals and expectations. The main leadership issues were coaches and coaching styles. The main team issues were team atmosphere, support network, roles, and communication. The findings are discussed in relation to previous research and in terms of their implications for sport organizations and personnel working with elite performers.

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Stine Nylandsted Jensen, Andreas Ivarsson, Johan Fallby, and Anne-Marie Elbe

This study investigated gambling among Danish and Swedish male elite football players. A cross-sectional design was used to survey 323 players (Mage = 22.08, SD = 5.15). The survey included a screening tool for gambling, as well as measures for depression and sport anxiety. The overall rate of players identified as at-risk gamblers was 16.1%. Linear regression analyses revealed that depression and sport anxiety significantly predicted gambling behaviors, and explained 2% and 6% of variance, respectively. The age of the players and the age at which they specialize did not moderate these relationships. Further research on gambling in football and its relation to mental disorders is needed.

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Tara K. Scanlan, David G. Russell, Larry A. Scanlan, Tatiana J. Klunchoo, and Graig M. Chow

Following a thorough review of the current updated Sport Commitment Model, new candidate commitment sources for possible future inclusion in the model are presented. They were derived from data obtained using the Scanlan Collaborative Interview Method. Three elite New Zealand teams participated: amateur All Black rugby players, amateur Silver Fern netball players, and professional All Black rugby players. An inductive content analysis of these players’ open-ended descriptions of their sources of commitment identified four unique new candidate commitment sources: Desire to Excel, Team Tradition, Elite Team Membership, and Worthy of Team Membership. A detailed definition of each candidate source is included along with example quotes from participants. Using a mixed-methods approach, these candidate sources provide a basis for future investigations to test their viability and generalizability for possible expansion of the Sport Commitment Model.