Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "emergency action plan" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Ron Courson, Lenny Navitskis, and Harris Patel

Restricted access

Katie Walsh

Restricted access

Brian W. Potter and R. Daniel Martin

Edited by Shane Caswell

Restricted access

Erin E. Dierickx, Samantha E. Scarneo-Miller, and Douglas J. Casa

Participation in high school sports has grown to nearly 8 million athletes who account for 78% of all catastrophic events in sport ( 2018–2019 High School Athletics Participation Survey Results, 2020 ; Kucera & Cantu, 2019 ). The adoption and implementation of emergency action plans (EAPs) can

Restricted access

Rebecca L. Mokris, Gary R. Hanna, and Audra W. Neumann

Edited by Shane Caswell

Restricted access

Christine C. Center, Samuel J. Wilkins, Ross Mathiasen, and Adam B. Rosen

These signs indicate the potential for increased cranial pressure, which could be fatal if not managed appropriately and promptly. ATs should have preestablished and well-rehearsed emergency action plans specific to each venue. 12 Timely management of a traumatic brain injury could be the difference

Restricted access

Riana R. Pryor, Douglas J. Casa, Susan W. Yeargin, and Zachary Y. Kerr

% Schools With More Than One Paid AT % p Value Emergency policy  Had an emergency action plan 85.5 (956/1,118) 83.9 (381/454) 86.6 (575/664) .212  Had policy with instructions to initiate EMS response 89.1 (1,000/1,122) 86.8 (396/456) 90.7 (604/666) .042 Equipment available  Filled immersion tub with ice

Restricted access

Ron Courson and Glenn R. Henry

Open access

Mark Stanbrough

Coaches play an extremely valuable role in a profession that offers the opportunity to help develop young people. The purpose of this study, which assessed the state of coaching education, was two-fold: 1) to determine coaching education knowledge and skills in meeting the National Coaching Standards, and 2) to determine the application of effective coaching principles in meeting the National Coaching Standards. An email containing a website link for an online survey was sent to all athletic directors in Kansas middle and high schools asking them to forward the website link to all coaches they worked with. A total of 1,414 surveys were returned. The current state of coaching education assessment listed the national coaching standards developed by NASPE and used a Likert scale to ask how prepared and successful the coaches are in meeting the standard. Results of the survey indicated that coaches feel highly prepared and successful in the following coaching standard topics: teaching positive behavior (Standard 2), demonstrating ethical conduct (Standard 4), environmental conditions (Standard 7), positive learning environments (Standard 19), and skills of the sport (standard 27). Coaches indicated that they felt least prepared and least successful in the following standards: coordinated health care program (Standard 10), psychological implications (Standard 11), conditioning based on exercise physiology (Standard 12), teaching proper nutrition (Standard 13), conditioning to return to play after injury (Standard 15), mental skill training (Standard 24), managing human resources (Standard 32), managing fiscal resources (Standard 33) and emergency action plans (Standard 34). Findings from the study can be used to direct coaching education in the areas coaches feel they are less prepared and less successful.