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Kelly L. Simonton, Alex C. Garn and Melinda Ann Solmon

Purpose:

Grounded in control-value theory, a model of students’ achievement emotions in physical education (PE) was investigated.

Methods:

A path analysis tested hypotheses that students’ (N = 529) perceptions of teacher responsiveness, assertiveness, and clarity predict control and value beliefs which, in turn, predict enjoyment and boredom.

Results:

Teacher clarity predicted student control (β = .31; R 2= .09) and value (β = .21; R 2= .07) beliefs. Value and control beliefs positively predicted enjoyment (β = .71; β = .11; R 2 = .58) and negatively predicted boredom (β = -.61; β = -.13; R2 = .47).

Discussion:

Findings provide meaningful information about the source of students’ emotional experiences in PE. The importance of instructional clarity within the model highlights the need for teachers to use a variety of clarifying strategies during instruction. The strong links between value beliefs and emotions suggest teachers need to explicitly discuss the intrinsic and extrinsic worth of PE content.

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Guillaume Martinent and Claude Ferrand

The purpose of this study was to explore the directional interpretation process of discrete emotions experienced by table tennis players during competitive matches by adopting a naturalistic qualitative video-assisted approach. Thirty self-confrontation interviews were conducted with 11 national table tennis players (2 or 3 matches per participants). Nine discrete emotions were identified through the inductive analyses of the participants' transcriptions: anger, anxiety, discouragement, disappointment, disgust, joy, serenity, relief, and hope. Inductive analyses revealed the emergence of 4 categories and 13 themes among the 9 discrete emotions: positive direction (increased concentration, increased motivation, increased confidence, positive sensations, and adaptive behaviors), negative direction (decreased concentration, decreased motivation, too confident, decreased confidence, negative sensations, and maladaptive behaviors), neutral direction (take more risk and take less risk), and no perceived influence on own performance. Results are discussed in terms of current research on directional interpretation and emotions in sport.

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Marco Rathschlag and Daniel Memmert

The present study examined the relationship between self-generated emotions and physical performance. All participants took part in five emotion induction conditions (happiness, anger, anxiety, sadness, and an emotion-neutral state) and we investigated their influence on the force of the finger musculature (Experiment 1), the jump height of a counter-movement jump (Experiment 2), and the velocity of a thrown ball (Experiment 3). All experiments showed that participants could produce significantly better physical performances when recalling anger or happiness emotions in contrast to the emotion-neutral state. Experiments 1 and 2 also revealed that physical performance in the anger and the happiness conditions was significantly enhanced compared with the anxiety and the sadness conditions. Results are discussed in relation to the Lazarus (1991a, 2000a) cognitive-motivational-relational (CMR) theory framework.

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Paul A. Davis, Louise Davis, Samuel Wills, Ralph Appleby and Arne Nieuwenhuys

dysfunctional cognitions and emotions ( Jones & Harwood, 2008 ; McPherson, 2000 ). In this process of evaluation, athletes may consider the emotional state of their fellow competitors and attempt to determine whether an opponent is in his or her optimal emotional state for performance ( Hanin, 2003 ). The

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Serge Brand, Markus Gerber, Flora Colledge, Edith Holsboer-Trachsler, Uwe Pühse and Sebastian Ludyga

, this is problematic, as the Social Contract Theory ( Cosmides et al., 2005 ) claims, among others, that identifying and remembering faces of individuals breaking social rules is crucial for coping with cheaters, free riders, or defectors. Moreover, functional deficits in emotion processing, and the

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Jun Woo Kim, Marshall Magnusen and Hyun-Woo Lee

The concurrence of two opposite emotions is one of the most debated questions in contemporary emotion research. Traditional approaches to the study of consumer emotions tend to categorize consumption experiences as either positive or negative ( Oliver, 1993 ). Consumers who are satisfied with their

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Marc V. Jones

Emotions play a central role in sport performance. Accordingly, it is important that athletes are able to draw on a range of strategies to enhance emotional control. The present paper outlines a number of strategies based on Lazarus’ cognitive-motivational-relational theory of emotion. Strategies are outlined that aim to change cognitions, resulting in either a more appropriate emotional response or a suppression of the expression of emotion and any maladaptive behavioral consequences. These techniques comprise self-statement modification, imagery, socratic dialogue, corrective experiences, self-analysis, didactic approach, storytelling metaphors and poetry, reframing, cognitive paradox, and use of problem-solving skills. Furthermore, given the changes in physiological arousal accompanying certain emotions, it is also suggested that general arousal control strategies could play an important role in emotional control.

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T. Bettina Cornwell, Steffen Jahn, Hu Xie and Wang Suk Suh

associated with sponsor benefits such as purchase intention for a sponsor’s products ( Madrigal, 2000 ; Smith, Graetz, & Westerbeek, 2008 ). Studies have also shown that event emotions influence event-related evaluations and attitudes toward sponsors ( Chakraborti & Roy, 2013 ; Lee, Lee, Lee, & Babin, 2008

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Ye Hoon Lee, Hyungil Harry Kwon and K. Andrew R. Richards

Emotional intelligence has received significant attention within the research literature related to education, psychology, and management in recent decades ( Hodzic, Scharfen, Ripoll, Holling, & Zenasni, 2017 ). Defined as the ability to perceive, understand, regulate, and utilize emotions ( Mayer

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Tracy C. Donachie, Andrew P. Hill and Daniel J. Madigan

Precompetition emotions can result in better or worse performance ( Beedie, Terry, & Lane, 2000 ). These are also part of an overall sporting experience for athletes that will influence their motivation and well-being ( Nicholls, Polman, & Levy, 2012 ). It is, therefore, unsurprising that sport