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Brendon P. Hyndman, Amanda C. Benson, Shahid Ullah, Caroline F. Finch, and Amanda Telford

Background:

Enjoyment and play during school lunchtime are correlated with children’s physical activity. Despite this, there is an absence of studies reporting children’s enjoyment of play during school lunchtime breaks. The purpose of this study was to examine the intraday and interday reliability of children’s enjoyment of school lunchtime play.

Methods:

Surveys used to assess children’s enjoyment of lunchtime play were distributed to and completed by 197 children (112 males, 85 females), aged 8–12 years attending an elementary school in Victoria, Australia. Children completed the surveys during class before lunch (expected enjoyment) and after lunch (actual enjoyment) for 5 days. The intra- and interday enjoyment of school lunchtime play reliability were determined using a weighted kappa.

Results:

Intraday kappa values ranged from fair (0.31) to substantial (0.75) within each of the 5 days (median kappa = 0.41). In comparison, “expected” (0.09–0.40; median 0.30) and “actual” (0.05–0.46; median 0.28) interday enjoyment of lunchtime play displayed low reliability.

Conclusions:

Children’s enjoyment of lunchtime play appears to be more consistent within days than across days. The findings suggest that assessment of children’s enjoyment of lunchtime play once on a single day would be representative of a particular day but not necessarily that particular school week.

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Liang Hu, Shoubin Cheng, Jiaying Lu, Lele Zhu, and Ling Chen

Purpose:

In this study, we examined the effect of the manipulation of exercise self-efficacy on the enjoyment of physical activity in a sample of 44 Chinese adolescents (age = 14.27 ± .87 y), including 22 boys and 22 girls.

Methods:

The participants were randomized into a low-efficacy or high-efficacy condition, and their self-efficacy beliefs for engaging in moderate-intensity physical activity were manipulated by providing false feedback after a submaximal exercise test. The participants’ self-efficacy was measured and compared before and after the exercise test and the participants’ enjoyment of physical activity was assessed after the exercise test.

Results:

It was found that exercise self-efficacy was successfully manipulated in the expected direction in both conditions, which significantly influenced the participants’ enjoyment of physical activity. After the exercise test, the participants in the low-efficacy condition reported lower enjoyment scores relative to the high-efficacy participants.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that self-efficacy may have an important influence on the enjoyment of physical activity among Chinese adolescents. We recommend that physical activity promotion programs should be tailored to enhance adolescents’ self-efficacy beliefs and enjoyment of the experience of physical activity.

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Jay C. Kimiecik and Amy T. Harris

It has been suggested that enjoyment is a key construct for understanding and explaining the motivation and experiences of sport and exercise participants (Scanlan & Simons, 1992; Wankel, 1993). In this paper, definitions of enjoyment used by sport and exercise psychology researchers are reviewed, and the conceptual and measurement implications for the study of sport and exercise experiences are discussed. In many studies investigating enjoyment, researchers have not adequately defined the construct. Also, there are possible limitations with proposed definitions of enjoyment (e.g., Scanlan & Simons, 1992; Wankel, 1993). One possible way of addressing these limitations is to conceptualize and define enjoyment as flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1993). To support this enjoyment-equals-flow contention, enjoyment/flow is compared with other related constructs: affect, attitude, pleasure, and intrinsic motivation. Implications of the suggested definition of enjoyment as flow for past and present enjoyment research in sport and exercise psychology are discussed.

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Nic Martinez, Marcus W. Kilpatrick, Kristen Salomon, Mary E. Jung, and Jonathan P. Little

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has many known physiological benefits, but research investigating the psychological aspects of this training is limited. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the affective and enjoyment responses to continuous and high-intensity interval exercise sessions. Twenty overweight-to-obese, insufficiently active adults completed four counterbalanced trials: a 20-min trial of heavy continuous exercise and three 24-min HIIT trials that used 30-s, 60-s, and 120-s intervals. Affect declined during all trials (p < .05), but affect at the completion of trials was more positive in the shorter interval trials (p < .05). Enjoyment declined in the 120-s interval and heavy continuous conditions only (p < .05). Postexercise enjoyment was higher in the 60-s trial than in the 120-s trial and heavy continuous condition (p < .05). Findings suggest that pleasure and enjoyment are higher during shorter interval trials than during a longer interval or heavy continuous exercise.

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Windee M. Weiss

influence an athlete’s level of commitment to sport (sport enjoyment, involvement opportunities, personal investments, attractive alternatives, social constraints, social support, and perceived costs). Each of these predictors is hypothesized to either enhance or detract from an athlete’s resolve and desire

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Yang Bai, Kelly Allums-Featherston, Pedro F. Saint-Maurice, Gregory J. Welk, and Norma Candelaria

) predisposing factors (eg, self-efficacy, enjoyment) and reinforcing factors (eg, family influence, peer influence). The enabling factors and reinforcing factors include the elements of social-ecological model. However, predisposing factors are considered the central element of the Youth Physical Activity

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Maria-Christina Kosteli, Jennifer Cumming, and Sarah E. Williams

, & Dowda, 2008 ) indicating the importance of self-regulation as a strategy to enhance PA. Self-regulation is likely associated with PA through other PA correlates. An intrinsic and affective variable that could mediate the relationship between self-regulation and PA is enjoyment, which can in turn

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Kari Roethlisberger, Vista Beasley, Jeffrey Martin, Brigid Byrd, Krista Munroe-Chandler, and Irene Muir

, 2011 ). Three major contributors to young females’ attrition from organized sport include lack of sport commitment, dedication to other competing priorities, and a lack of sport enjoyment ( Brown, Salmon, & Pearson, 2014 ; Crane & Temple, 2015 ). Sport commitment is the psychological condition that

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Angela Devereux-Fitzgerald, Rachael Powell, and David P. French

numerous types of enjoyment around physical activity: social interaction, intrinsic fun, sense of achievement, increased confidence ( Devereux-Fitzgerald, Powell, Dewhurst, & French, 2016 ), structure/routine, sense of purpose, and pleasure of total immersion in an activity ( Phoenix & Orr, 2014

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Cheryl A. Howe, Kimberly A. Clevenger, Danielle McElhiney, Camille Mihalic, and Moira A. Ragan

-efficacy, are the key to initiating and sustaining children’s PA behavior. 3 Furthermore, children participate in PA out of enjoyment or fun, and intrinsic motivation for PA participation is enhanced and maintained if a child gets personal satisfaction or enjoyment from the behavior. 4 Much research supports a