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Cynthia J. Wright, Nico G. Silva, Erik E. Swartz and Brent L. Arnold

providing emergency care for football athletes must be proficient in equipment removal techniques that maintain cervical alignment, such as facemask removal to provide airway access. 6 Previous research has demonstrated that facemask (rather than helmet) removal is the preferred method to allow airway

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Shota Tanaka, Hiroki Ueta, Ryo Sagisaka, Shuji Sakanashi, Takahiro Hara and Hideharu Tanaka

pads, which took 24.4 ± 7.2 s and caused a delay in chest exposure and compression initiation. 9 Studies on CPR quality and protective equipment removal during American football and lacrosse have been reported previously. 9 – 17 The rate of adequate chest compression depth was 46% lower when football

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Richard J. Boergers, Thomas G. Bowman, Nicole Sgherza, Marguerite Montjoy, Melanie Lu and Christopher W. O’Brien

Key Points ▸ Lack of personnel and training are barriers for prehospital equipment removal. ▸ Athletic trainers do not frequently practice equipment removal with emergency medical services (EMS). ▸ Athletic trainers do not have confidence in EMS equipment removal skills. One of the primary roles of

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Michael C. Dahl, Dheera Ananthakrishnan, Gregg Nicandri, Jens R. Chapman and Randal P. Ching

Football, one of the country’s most popular team sports, is associated with the largest overall number of sports-related, catastrophic, cervical spine injuries in the United States (Mueller, 2007). Patient handling can be hindered by the protective sports equipment worn by the athlete. Improper stabilization of these patients can exacerbate neurologic injury. Because of the lack of consensus on the best method for equipment removal, a study was performed comparing three techniques: full body levitation, upper torso tilt, and log roll. These techniques were performed on an intact and lesioned cervical spine cadaveric model simulating conditions in the emergency department. The levitation technique was found to produce motion in the anterior and right lateral directions. The tilt technique resulted in motions in the posterior left lateral directions, and the log roll technique generated motions in the right lateral direction and had the largest amount of increased instability when comparing the intact and lesioned specimen. These findings suggest that each method of equipment removal displays unique weaknesses that the practitioner should take into account, possibly on a patient-by-patient basis.

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believed athletic trainers are the most qualified health care providers to perform athletic equipment removal. a. True b. False 13. In order to reach the adequate number of personnel, most athletic trainers will need to work with emergency medical services personnel to perform their desired emergency