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Terry L. Rizzo, Penny McCullagh and Donna Pastore

of community needs. To retain faculty members, departments must effectively evaluate their staff and develop retention strategies to ensure that colleagues maintain their passion for teaching, scholarly activities, and service to the discipline and profession over the course of a typical career in

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Julia Rudecki, Katie Weatherson and Guy Faulkner

, factors influencing desk usage, and acceptability of a low-cost standing desk in the home environment. Methods Study Design This exploratory study aimed to understand if there was interest in using standing desks in the home environment. The evaluation was primarily qualitative consisting of interviews

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Carole V. Harris, Andrew S. Bradlyn, Nancy O. Tompkins, Melanie B. Purkey, Keri A. Kennedy and George A. Kelley

Background:

The West Virginia Healthy Lifestyles Act contained 5 school-based mandates intended to reduce childhood obesity. These addressed the sale of healthy beverages, physical education time, fitness assessment, health education and assessment, and Body Mass Index measurement. This article describes the processes and methods used to evaluate efforts to implement the legislation.

Methods:

University researchers and state public health and education staff formed the collaborative evaluation team. To assess perceptions and practices, surveys were completed with school personnel (53 superintendents, 586 principals, 398 physical education teachers, 214 nurses) and telephone interviews were conducted with a multistage, stratified sample of 1500 parents and 420 students statewide. Healthcare providers (N = 122) were surveyed regarding current child weight practices and interactions with families. Statewide data reflecting fitness, physical education plans, local wellness policies, and health knowledge were included in the evaluation.

Results:

The evaluation was facilitated by state officials and agencies, resulting in good access to survey groups and high survey response rates for school personnel (57% to 95% response rates); a substantially lower response rate was obtained for healthcare providers (22%).

Conclusions:

Collaborative design and implementation was a key factor in the successful conduct of this obesity policy evaluation.

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Kelly Mattran, Carmen Harris, Jan Jernigan and Janet Fulton

Background:

The State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2010 (SIRPA) and accompanying resources provide information for practitioners to promote physical activity. This study evaluated awareness, access, and use of materials among physical activity practitioners.

Methods:

A Web-based survey assessed awareness, access and use among respondents. The 26-item questionnaire assessed the usability of products developed by the federal government. Response frequencies and 95% confidence intervals were reported.

Results:

Response rate was 27% (135 of 508). Awareness of material was from e-mail (35.6%) or partner Websites (37.8%). One-third of respondents (33.3%) accessed materials at least once a month, but 39.3% reported no use. The SIRPA (44.4%) and state-specific action guides (34.1%) were used the most. Materials were used to compare state-specific to national data (57.0%) and to present data to the public (41.5%). Most respondents (83%) reported public health partners as a target audience, and 91.8% were likely to share information in the future.

Conclusions:

SIRPA awareness was primarily through electronic communication, and two-thirds of respondents used the materials. Respondents accessed materials for state comparisons and public distribution. Increasing the use of federal physical activity promotion materials involves considering design and dissemination features related to the needs of practitioners.

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Emily Kroshus, Jessica Wagner, David L. Wyrick and Brian Hainline

.com/ncaa/files/ssi/mental-health/toolkits/coach/story.html ) has been provided by the NCAA Sport Science Institute (hereafter referred to as the “online module”) under the umbrella of their “Coaches Assist” resources. This module has not been evaluated to-date. A lack of program evaluation has been identified as a weakness of much education provided in sports

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Tracy Nau, Karen Lee, Ben J. Smith, William Bellew, Lindsey Reece, Peter Gelius, Harry Rutter and Adrian Bauman

These generally observed cross-sectoral engagements in the development of PA policies but noted that there was scope for this to be broadened and better coordinated in policy implementation. A lack of measurable indicators and clear plans for policy evaluation was a commonly reported weakness. The

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Natalia Romero-Franco, Juan Antonio Montaño-Munuera, Juan Carlos Fernández-Domínguez and Pedro Jiménez-Reyes

performance and injuries. 1 , 4 For this reason, many researchers have considered its evaluation in sports population. 3 , 5 , 6 To do that, authors often use sophisticated instruments like isokinetic dynamometers (Humac Norm 776, CSMi, Stoughton, MA) and 3space Fast track (sensors) (Polhemus, Colchester

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Christopher J. Nightingale, Sidney N. Mitchell and Stephen A. Butterfield

endorsed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( STEADI, 2015 ) as a clinically useful tool for evaluating gait, strength, and balance in determining fall risk in older patients. However, to date, limited research exists to determine the validity of the TUG test as a measurement of balance

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Amy A. Eyler, Aaron Hipp, Cheryl Ann Valko, Ramya Ramadas and Marissa Zwald

allowed for evaluation planning and collection of baseline data from faculty and staff prior to Hillman Hall occupancy. Although the Brown School Expansion Evaluation Project (BEEP) included 3 components, such as PA, collaboration, and sustainability, the aim of the current paper is to describe the

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Tiffany Young and Chantelle Sharpe

Background:

Grandparents and the grandchildren they raise may experience stress related to their caregiving relationship that negatively impacts their health. Thus, there is a need to develop intergenerational health promotion interventions for these kinship families.

Methods:

An 8-week intergenerational physical activity intervention for kinship families was developed and implemented. The specific goal was to understand the process of implementing the intervention. Content analysis of observational data provided an in-depth account of the intervention’s process (ie, recruitment, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, and context).

Results:

Community and support service organizations referred more participants to the study than individual stakeholders. Most participants attended approximately 10 classes, and the grandparents were more engaged than the grandchildren during the classes. Intervention fidelity was confirmed with the fidelity checklist and observational notes. Health emerged as a barrier to participation, while the intergenerational nature of the intervention was a facilitator. Lastly, the context domain described how the grandparents’ complex lives affected their ability to participate, while the dedication of the recreation staff helped the intervention to proceed efficiently.

Conclusion:

The distinct details gleaned from this study can provide guidance on how to develop and implement future intergenerational interventions.