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Zella E. Moore

The primary purpose of this article is to expand the discussion about the role of science, clinical thinking, the state of the discipline, and the manner in which evidence-based practice may aid in the development of the field of sport psychology. Rejecting pseudoscientific principles and embracing sound scientific standards of research and practice will result in an increasingly fresh and vibrant field from which greater innovation and evolution can occur. This innovation will inevitably lead to a renewed commitment to theory building, as the evolving scientific database will drive new ways of thinking about the myriad of issues presented by athletic clientele. By embracing the evidence-based practice philosophy, not only will sound scientific advancements emerge, but most importantly, the overall well-being of our athletic clientele will be enhanced.

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Insook Kim, Phillip Ward, Oleg Sinelnikov, Bomna Ko, Peter Iserbyt, Weidong Li and Matthew Curtner-Smith

-Hammond & Bransford, 2005 ; Kennedy, 2016 ; Ward, 2016 ). Mirroring the larger educational community, there have been calls for sport pedagogists to develop this kind of evidence-based practice for physical educators to employ ( Hastie, 2016 ; Institute of Medicine, 2013 ; McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013 ; Ward, 2013

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Yeshayahu Shayke Hutzler

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a growing movement in the health and educational disciplines that recommends emphasis on research outcomes during decision making in practice. EBP is made possible through evidence based research (EBR), which attempts to synthesize the volume and scientific rigor of intervention effectiveness. With the purpose of assessing the impact of this movement on adapted physical activity, this article (a) describes EBP/EBR and outlines its methodological development, (b) provides an historical perspective of EBP/EBR in APA, (c) examines EBR quality indicators in the review literature published in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, (d) identifies and synthesizes thematic domains appearing in these review articles, and (e) discusses practical examples of professional issues in APA arising from a lack of EBR.

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Marcel Bouffard and Greg Reid

The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has been extremely influential over the last 20 years. Fields like medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, psychology, and education have adopted the idea that policy makers and practitioners should use interventions that have demonstrated efficiency and effectiveness. This apparently straightforward idea is beginning to affect adapted physical activity; however, researchers and practitioners in our field often appear to be unaware of fundamental questions related to them. The major purpose of this paper is to outline and discuss 10 of these fundamental questions. This analysis leads us to conclude that EBP is a good direction to pursue in adapted physical activity if we develop a type of EBP congruent with the main tenets of our field.

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Thomas Rowland

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Thomas Rowland

Science is based on the idea that there is a truth, whether or not we have access to it. What we know depends on systems of knowledge, and we may never be able to get to specific truths, but the idea is that there is a reality; there is a way humans evolved or cancers grow, for instance. And science is a way to get to that.

Ariel Ruiz I Altaba (2010)

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Jennifer M. Medina McKeon and Patrick O. McKeon

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Patrick O. McKeon, Jennifer M. Medina McKeon and Marjorie A. King

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Parminder Raina, Helen Massfeller and Colin Macarthur