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Marlana J. Kohn, Basia Belza, Miruna Petrescu-Prahova, Christina E. Miyawaki and Katherine H. Hohman

This study examined participant demographic and physical function characteristics from EnhanceFitness, an evidence-based physical activity program for older adults. The sample consisted of 19,964 older adults. Participant data included self-reported health and demographic variables, and results for three physical function tests: chair stand, arm curls, and timed up-and-go. Linear regression models compared physical function test results among eight program site types. Participants were, on average, 72 years old, predominantly female, and reported having one chronic condition. Residential site participants’ physical function test results were significantly poorer on chair stand and timed up-and-go measures at baseline, and timed up-and-go at a four-month follow-up compared with the reference group (senior centers) after controlling for demographic variables and site clustering. Evidence-based health-promotion programs offered in community settings should assess demographic, health, and physical function characteristics to best serve participants’ specific needs, and offer classes tailored to participant function and ability while maintaining program fidelity.

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Cheryl Der Ananian, Renae Smith-Ray, Brad Meacham, Amy Shah and Susan Hughes

Walk with Ease (Camine con Gusto) by the Arthritis Foundation, suggesting the need to expand the number of evidence-based programming for the Hispanic population ( Brady, Jernick, Hootman, & Sniezek, 2009 ). Fit & Strong! is one of nine programs recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and

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Gregory W. Heath

Background:

Regular physical activity has been demonstrated to protect against coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, selected cancers, hypertension, obesity, and other chronic conditions. Therefore, the public health significance of promoting physical activity and preventing inactivity has become a well-established agenda for public health agencies at all levels.

Methods:

A secondary search of the literature, focusing on existing evidence reviews, was conducted to identify effective or promising public health physical activity interventions. Further examination of published evidence-based programs also was carried out to supplement the known evidence base. Intervention strategies were selected using criteria prescribed by each of the systematic reviews to yield categories of intervention effectiveness.

Key recommendations:

The selected physical activity interventions conformed to the domains identified by The Guide to Community Preventive Services. Recommended evidenced-based strategies from within the domain of informational approaches include 2 exemplary community-wide campaigns; mass media campaigns, represented by VERB; and an emerging practice of delivery of short physical activity messages at key community sites. Exemplary representative behavioral/social interventions include social support through organized walking clubs/partners within communities. Exemplary environmental/policy approaches include creating/enhancing access to places for physical activity with informational outreach activities and the emerging strategy of community-wide policies and planning.

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Rebecca Kyryliuk, Meghan Baruth and Sara Wilcox

Background:

Understanding predictors of weight loss can assist in developing targeted evidence-based programs to reduce obesity in faith-based settings. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of weight loss for a sample of African-American women taking part in in a church-based study.

Methods:

Participants (N = 350) completed physical assessments and comprehensive surveys at baseline and 15 months later. Analyses examined baseline variables and change in variables from baseline to posttest, as predictors of ≥ 5% weight loss at posttest. Demographic, health-related, and behavioral variables were examined.

Results:

Lower baseline stress predicted greater likelihood of weight loss. Increased leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) from baseline to posttest was predictive of greater weight loss. The odds of ≥ 5% weight loss was 38% lower for every 1-point increase in baseline stress (OR = 0.62, CI = 0.39, 0.98, P = .04) and 6% greater for every 1-hour increase in posttest LTPA (OR = 1.06, CI = 1.0, 1.12, P = .049).

Conclusions:

Increased LTPA appears to be an independent predictor of modest but meaningful reductions in weight among African-American women. African-American women reporting higher levels of stress at baseline may require more intense strategies emphasizing increased LTPA to lose weight.

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Michael P. Corcoran, Miriam E. Nelson, Jennifer M. Sacheck, Kieran F. Reid, Dylan Kirn, Roger A. Fielding, Kenneth K.H. Chui and Sara C. Folta

This cluster-randomized trial was designed to determine the efficacy of a 6-month exercise-nutritional supplement program (ENP) on physical function and nutritional status for older adults and the feasibility of implementing this program in a senior living setting. Twenty senior-living facilities were randomized to either a 3 day per week group-based ENP led by a trained facility staff member or a health education program (SAP). Participants (N = 121) completed a short physical performance battery, 400-m walk, handgrip strength test, and mini-nutrition assessment. 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], insulin-like growth-factor 1 (IGF-1), and activity level were also measured. The ENP did not significantly improve physical function or nutritional status compared with the SAP. Compared with baseline, participants in the ENP engaged in 39 min less physical activity per week at 6 months. Several facility characteristics hindered implementation of the ENP. This study highlights the complexity of implementing an evidence-based program in a field setting.

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Rebecca Reynolds, Santhya and David Menzies

recently, a physical activity alliance was launched in 2014 among 11 members and was called the National Physical Activity Alliance (NPAA). 7 This alliance aimed to connect community members, exercise health professionals, and evidence-based programs, with a focus on people who are at risk of or who have

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Catherine P. Abel-Berei, Grace Goc Karp, Marcis Fennell, Elisa Drake and Simon Olsen

: Quality PE, during school PA, before- and after-school PA, staff engagement in PA, and family/community engagement Quality PE; use of technology; value of PD; during and before school PA; PE staff K–12 teamwork and bonding; evidence-based programming; model for other academic areas, respect from

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Angela Papadimitriou and Mark Perry

an evidence-based program to prevent falls in older adults, Texas, 2007–2009 . Preventing Chronic Disease, 7 ( 6 ), A130 . PubMed ID: 20950537 * Parry , S.W. , Bamford , C. , Deary , V. , Finch , T.L. , Gray , J. , MacDonald , C. , & McColl , E.M. ( 2016 ). Cognitive behavioural

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Tim Henwood, Sharon Hetherington, Madeleine Purss, Kevin Rouse, Julie Morrow and Michele Smith

, irregular, and short-term in nature ( McIntyre, Henwood, & Webby, 2011 )). Given the growth of the older population and financial implications for government spending, evidence-based programs such as active@home are important tools to prolong independence for older people. active@home offers a positive

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Scott Pierce, Jedediah Blanton and Daniel Gould

shared mission to provide evidence-based programming that reaches as many student-athletes as possible. As the guiding tenet of our SPP partnership role, we understood that we were being valued in our ability to provide up-to-date evidence-based approaches for teaching and learning of youth leadership