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Tobias Lundgren, Lennart Högman, Markus Näslund, and Thomas Parling

Elite level ice hockey places high demands on player’s physical and technical attributes as well as on cognitive and executive functions. There is, however, a notable lack of research on these attributes and functions. The present study investigated executive function with selected tests from the D-KEFS test battery among 48 ice hockey players and compared them to a standardized sample. Results show that ice hockey players’ scores were significantly higher on Design Fluency (DF) compared with the standardized sample score. Elite players’ scores were not significantly higher than those of lower-league hockey players. A significant correlation was found between on-ice performance and Trail Making Test (TMT) scores. Exploratory analysis showed that elite-level center forwards scored significantly higher on DF than did players in other positions. Future research should investigate whether assessment of executive function should be taken into account, in addition to physical and technical skills, when scouting for the next ice hockey star.

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Kelly Lynn Mulvey, Sally Taunton, Adam Pennell, and Ali Brian

Executive function refers to a set of top-down mental processes that are essential for attention, focusing, and concentration ( Diamond, 2013 ). Executive function processes include a wide range of adaptive skills, such as inhibitory control, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and it is

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SeYun Park and Jennifer L. Etnier

age as a moderator, but conducted the analyses on all studies in their review and so did not report on the effects specific to cognitive performance postexercise. Two recent meta-analyses of this literature have limited their focus to studies on executive function (EF) and have also examined age group

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Ines Pfeffer and Tilo Strobach

impact of trait self-control, executive functions, and their interactions on the intention–behavior gap in the context of physical activity. Trait Self-Control and Physical Activity Behavior Although motivation to carry out a goal-directed behavior is important, the ability to translate this motivation

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Chien-Chih Chou, Kuan-Chou Chen, Mei-Yao Huang, Hsin-Yu Tu, and Chung-Ju Huang

, particularly in executive function (EF; Volkow et al., 2009 ; Walther, Birdsill, Glisky, & Ryan, 2009 ). EF refers to as a family of top-down mental processes that are necessary for the cognitive control of behavior, is self-monitoring or self-regulation behaviors that facilitate the attainment of chosen

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Adam Beavan, Vincent Chin, Louise M. Ryan, Jan Spielmann, Jan Mayer, Sabrina Skorski, Tim Meyer, and Job Fransen

while negating acting on impulsive decisions, which can be attributed to the simultaneous development of cognitive control functions, such as working memory, inhibition, and flexibility ( Diamond & Lee, 2011 ). These three cognitive abilities are known as core executive functions (EFs), a type of high

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Anna Meijer, Marsh Königs, Irene M.J. van der Fels, Chris Visscher, Roel J. Bosker, Esther Hartman, and Jaap Oosterlaan

effects of physical activity ( Best, 2010 ; de Greeff et al., 2018 ; Verburgh, Scherder, van Lange, & Oosterlaan, 2014 ). Executive functions (e.g., interference control and working memory) facilitate reasoning, problem solving, and planning ( Collins & Koechlin, 2012 ; Salthouse, 2005 ). Lower

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Alison B. Pritchard Orr, Kathy Keiver, Chris P. Bertram, and Sterling Clarren

anxiety disorders ( Paley & O’Connor, 2009 ). One of the cardinal deficits affecting neuropsychological function in individuals with PAE is in executive function (EF) ( Kodituwakku, 2009 ; Rasmussen, 2005 ). EF refers to a set of cognitive abilities required to attain goals efficiently in nonroutine

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Jesse Mala, Jennifer McGarry, Kristen E. Riley, Elaine C.-H. Lee, and Lindsay DiStefano

prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, which are associated with high-level thinking, memory, and executive functions ( Hair, Hanson, Wolfe, & Pollak, 2015 ; Hanson et al., 2012 ). Studies reveal systematic structural differences in the frontal lobe, hippocampus, and significantly less brain surface area

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Linda Paschen, Tim Lehmann, Miriam Kehne, and Jochen Baumeister

). These competences focus goal-directed behavior and are based on executive functions (EF). As an example, in the course of the school day, children let themselves being more easily distracted by disturbing stimuli due to fatigue. Thus, children with well-developed EF are able to better focus on relevant