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Jeffrey K. Kawaguchi and Robin K. Pickering

Edited by Mary Barnum

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Ross E. Andersen and John M. Jakicic

The aim of this review is to provide a scientific update on the current guidelines for both health and weight management. There has been confusion among health professionals as to which physical activity guidelines should be used to help various specific populations adopt more active lifestyles. We first review the history of the physical activity guidelines. Using the physical activity guidelines in clinical practice is also explored. We also describe common barriers to physical that overweight individuals report and we discuss when it is appropriate for a health care professional to seek a referral from an exercise scientist to help sedentary adults increase their levels of activity. It is important for individuals who care for overweight patients and sedentary adults to understand the current physical guidelines and how these guidelines can be worked into clinical practice.

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Taniya S. Nagpal, Catherine Everest, Sara C.S. Souza, Danilo F. da Silva, Shuhiba Mohammad, Jayonta Bhattacharjee and Kristi B. Adamo

between obesity and sedentary time has been inconclusive, and, overall, findings have not consistently shown that outcomes are a result of sedentary time exclusively and are not also influenced by whether or not individuals are meeting exercise recommendations. 4 – 6 Further research is required to

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J. Luke Pryor, Brittany Christensen, Catherine G. R. Jackson and Stephanie Moore-Reed

meeting daily exercise recommendations. It is of practical importance to note that MSUN and HSUN elicited 3.6 and 4.2 METs, respectively, which is significantly greater than the moderate-intensity threshold of 3.0. Furthermore, progressive increases in caloric expenditure, V ˙ O 2 , and HR were observed

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Todd M. Manini, Marvin Druger and Lori Ploutz-Snyder

The purposes of this study were to determine current opinions of strength exercise among older adults and whether knowledge of recommended protocols differs between strength-exercise participants and nonparticipants. One hundred twenty-nine older adults (77.5 ± 8.6 years) responded to questions about their opinions, experiences, and knowledge of strength-exercise recommendations. Some misconceptions were identified in the sample, with 48.4% of participants responding “no” to “strength training increases muscle mass,” 45% responding “no” to “increasing weight is more important than number of repetitions for building strength,” and 37% responding that walking is more effective than lifting weights at building muscle strength. The number of correct responses was related to the number of years in school (semipartial r 2 = .046). More education is needed about the benefits and recommendations to ensure proper use of current strength-exercise protocols among older adults.

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Eric D. Vidoni, Anna Mattlage, Jonathan Mahnken, Jeffrey M. Burns, Joe McDonough and Sandra A. Billinger

The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of a submaximal exercise test, the Step Test Exercise Prescription (STEP), in a broad age range and in individuals in the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Individuals (n = 102) underwent treadmill-based maximal exercise testing and a STEP. The STEP failed to predict peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), and was a biased estimate of VO2peak (p < .0001). Only 43% of subjects’ STEP results were within 3.5 ml · kg–1 · min–1 of VO2peak. When categorized into fitness levels these 2 measures demonstrated moderate agreement (kappa = .59). The validity of the STEP was not supported in our participants, including those with AD. The STEP may not be appropriate in the clinic as a basis for exercise recommendations in these groups, although it may continue to have utility in classifying fitness in research or community health screenings.

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Joanna L. Bokovoy and Steven N. Blair

Habitual exercise provides protection against fatal coronary heart disease, extends longevity, and enhances quality of life. National surveys show less physical activity in older men and women compared with middle-aged and younger persons; older women are particularly sedentary. Although there are still few longitudinal studies on exercise and physical activity in older individuals, the data support a positive relationship between physical activity and health and function in older individuals. The data further show that with regular physical activity, health and physical fitness are maintained or even increased over time in older individuals. Studies on physical activity requirements for beneficial health effects in the elderly are reviewed and presented, and exercise recommendations for older individuals are given.

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Sara Wilcox, Abby C. King, Glenn S. Brassington and David K. Ahn

Physical activity interventions are most effective when they are tailored to individual preferences. This study examined preferences for exercising on one’s own with some instruction vs. in a class in 1,820 middle-aged and 1,485 older adults. Overall, 69% of middle-aged and 67% of older adults preferred to exercise on their own with some instruction rather than in an exercise class. The study identified subgroups—5 of middle-aged and 6 of older adults—whose preferences for exercising on their own with some instruction ranged from 33–85%. Less educated women younger than 56, healthy women 65–71, and older men reporting higher stress levels were most likely to prefer classes. All other men and most women preferred exercising on their own. The identification of these subgroups enables us to tailor exercise recommendations to the preferences of middle-aged and older adults, with increased rates of physical activity adoption and maintenance a likely result.

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Pouran Faghri * MD, MS, FACSM Melissa Marcinick * ATC Stephanie Milazzo * MS, ATC, CSCS 5 2010 15 15 3 3 34 34 37 37 10.1123/att.15.3.34 Population-Specific Concerns The Pregnant Athlete, Part 2: Exercise Recommendations Mary Barnum EdD, MEd, ATC, LAT Jeffrey K. Kawaguchi * PhD, PT, ATC Robin K

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Inès Boukabous, Alexis Marcotte-Chénard, Taha Amamou, Pierre Boulay, Martin Brochu, Daniel Tessier, Isabelle Dionne and Eléonor Riesco

aerobic exercise recommendations (150 min/week of aerobic exercise at moderate intensity, in bouts of at least 10 min) have been shown to be an efficient intervention to promote FM loss and improve metabolic profile in aging women ( Frank et al., 2005 ; Irwin et al., 2003 ), thus reducing the risk of