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Akira Asada, Yong Jae Ko and Wonseok (Eric) Jang

In the field of sport management, researchers have examined the process of becoming a sports fan within the realm of sport socialization research ( Funk & James, 2001 , 2004 ; James, 2001 ; McPherson, 1976 ; Melnick & Wann, 2004 , 2011 ). Sport socialization refers to the process by which

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Jeffrey W. Kassing and Pratik Nyaupane

, 2012 ). Meanwhile, the epicenter for professional soccer remains squarely rooted in Europe as soccer clubs there have become global brands ( Richelieu, Lopez, & Desbordes, 2008 ). Moreover, the home stadia of these clubs serve as anchors for fan identities and local communities ( Mainwaring & Clark

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Ben Larkin and Janet S. Fink

it has been explored by sport management scholars ( Lock & Heere, 2017 ). While a considerable amount of research has gone into team identification, one constant is that scholars have always focused their studies on the positive attachments fans form with respect to their favorite team(s). Certainly

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Akira Asada and Yong Jae Ko

Sport management researchers have provided numerous perspectives for understanding the process whereby people become fans of sports teams in the realm of sport socialization research ( Funk & James, 2001 , 2004 ; McPherson, 1976 ; Melnick & Wann, 2004 , 2011 ). Socialization is the process by

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Craig Hyatt, Shannon Kerwin, Larena Hoeber and Katherine Sveinson

The literature on sport fans suggests that parents, most commonly fathers, have a significant influence on what teams their children come to support ( James, 2001 ; Kolbe & James, 2000 ; Spaaij & Anderson, 2010 ; Wann, 2006 ). However, in two studies involving former fans of National Hockey

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Thilo Kunkel, Rui Biscaia, Akiko Arai and Kwame Agyemang

still require further development to better understand fan reactions to athletes and related entities ( Arai et al., 2013 ; Hasaan et al., 2018 ). Star players are regularly cited as brand associations of teams (e.g.,  Daniels, Kunkel, & Karg, 2019 ), and superstar athletes have the potential to impact

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Matthew Katz, Bob Heere and E. Nicole Melton

When sport fans gather in stadiums, bars, pubs, or parking lots, they do so not merely as individuals, but as members of a larger collective ( Fairley & Tyler, 2012 ). As fans cheer for their favorite teams—rejoicing after wins and sulking after losses—they do so not in isolation, but alongside

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Matthew Katz, Thomas A. Baker III and Hui Du

Among the many characteristics of brand community ( Muniz & O’Guinn, 2001 ), few are more salient in the context of sport fans than their nongeographically bound nature. Sport fans do not need to live in the same geographic communities as the teams they support. For example, European soccer clubs

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Joe J. Phua

Research on sports fans has demonstrated a positive relationship between fan identification and self-esteem. The current investigation extended previous research by testing media use as a moderator. The author hypothesized that media use would be positively associated with measures of fan identification and collective self-esteem and also moderate the relationship between these 2 variables. This is because media use enhances positive distinctiveness for fans of sports teams, leading to higher collective self-esteem levels because of the ability to get up-to-date information about the team or player they support. Data gathered from student fans (N = 203) of a major U.S. west coast university football team confirmed the author’s expectations that sports fans’ use of 4 types of media—print, broadcast, online, and mobile phones—moderated the relationship between fan identification and collective self-esteem, with online media having the greatest impact on this relationship.

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Seong Hee Park, Daniel F. Mahony and T. Christopher Greenwell

Curiosity has been regarded as a key intrinsic motivational drive for facilitating human exploratory behaviors in many domains, such as psychology, education, and sport. However, no attempt has been made to measure curiosity in a sport context. The purpose of this study was to develop an effective and efficient sport fan exploratory curiosity scale (SFECS). A total of 657 participants were recruited and completed surveys. Various statistical analyses were used to examine the reliability and validity of the scale. The analyses resulted in a reliable and valid scale with three factors (Excitement, New Sport Events, Sport Facility) and a total of 10-items. The SFECS was useful in predicting various sport fan behaviors. Future research should be done in an effort to further refine the scale and to examine the role of curiosity in various practical areas in a sport context.